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Storing homemade bread with a crunchy crust

 
pollinator
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So I taught my daughter how to do 5 min bread yesterday. It was delicious.

Nice crunchy crust but we only waited 3 minutes instead of an hour or so to start eating. I like my bread warm

The crust was crunchy but then I wrapped it in foil when we were done which softened up the crust.

How do you store bread with a crunchy crust after you have sliced it open and eaten some?   Just cover the open part?  Or will waiting for it to rest help with that?

Seems like something I should know already but haven’t done bread in while.
 
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We use regular bread boxes.  It really is a moot point for us.  We only eat bread for breakfast,  and then we toast it. We go through two loaves of homemade a week.
 
M Johnson
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So brown bag or bread box keeps it from getting stale, but remains crunchy?
 
pollinator
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What happens if you just leave it on the side? My bread gets a soft crust just left uncovered, if I want to get a crispy crust I really have to work on it with steam and faf in the oven.
 
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it will only get crunchy again if you toast it, in my experience.
I also try to find some brown paper bags, or in a pinch I will use a flour package (paper). not too many paper bags around here any more!
 
pollinator
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Paper works better than foil.

But sooner or later a crunchy crust will turn soft. Normally on the second day, after one day in the ceramic bread box.

To keep up a bit of crust and to keep fresh, a bread should have a crust of about 2mm (and a certain crumb texture which can hold moisture - often not the case for pure yeast doughs).
As we like a mostly crusty bread, I will immediately freeze half a loaf, even if it will be eaten only 24 hours later on the following night. Then I take it out of the freezer two hours or so before dinner and put it in the oven for a while to recreate the original crunch.
 
William Bronson
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Foil, plastic or anything that holds in moisture can take the crunch out of crust, so I  sell and give away my bread in brown paper lunch sacks.

Keeping them small enough to fit into a lunch bag also means they ahave a high crust to interior ratio.

No knead recipes are very hydrated,  and they are usually cooked in a enclosed container,  which makes for a thick crackling crust.
My usual problem is bread crust getting too tough, especially for my older friends, which I combat by spraying loaves with an oil/liquid mixture at the end of baking.
This often results in a "brown bag with the dark stains that indicate freshness"

Ultimately,  I think a really crackling crust is a function of freshness, and a good reason to keep your bread making simple enough to do almost every day.


 
M Johnson
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I did the bread in an open cast iron pan with water in a tray at 450 degrees so I got a pretty good crust.  I’ll try the brown bag, sounds like fresh is the way to go
 
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put it in a bag and put it in the fridgidaire and freeze it, fresh breads take real well to being frozen then rethawed or toasting right out of deep freeze
 
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An alternative to a bread box if you don't have one (I don't) is to wrap the bread in cloth and put it in a big pot with a lid.
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