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Can you identify this plant?

 
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I saw it growing in my backyard lawn along my raised beds. Thought is was pretty so took a photo.  Anyone know what this is?  Anyone know of an app that can accurately identify these sorts of things?
IMG_4671.jpg
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pollinator
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Looks like white clover to me.
 
steward
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It's clover. I am unsure what kind of clover though. It's a nitrogen fixer, and bees & other pollinators love the blossoms. Red clover is medicinal. It'll blossom later this spring and will help narrow down identification.
 
pollinator
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A clover for sure. How tall was the plant.What was the color of the flowers
 
Jennifer Lowery
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S Bengi wrote:A clover for sure. How tall was the plant.What was the color of the flowers



Very short (6 inches) and no blossoms yet.
 
pollinator
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It reminds me of the little clover thingies with the tiny yellow flowers.

EDIT: I looked it up and it's not the tiny yellow ones. The clover I saw with the round leaf segments and light stripe were white clover.
 
S Bengi
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80% they are white clover 16% they are subterranean clover.
 
pollinator
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Wait for the flowers and you'll know.

The only clover that is not edible has yellow flowers.

The rest are all good to nibble, tea, soup, etc
 
Jennifer Lowery
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Here are the flowers.  It's all over my back yard now.  Is this a good cover crop for the raised beds in the winter?   Would it sprout say in October in Zone 7A?  (first frost date Nov 3).

Could I save the seed from all the flowers to germinate in the beds?  I haven't mowed the lawn yet.

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Jennifer Lowery
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Would you say what I have growing in my yard is "Whtie Dutch Clover"?  I heard this is a preferable cover crop.  I just don't know when to collect the flowers.. i.e. when are the seeds mature enough to pick?  I'd like to pick the flowers at just the right time time, and I guess let them dry out and shake out the seed?
 
Jennifer Lowery
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I see that White Dutch Clover seed is really cheap on ebay.  Would it be better for me to just buy that or would it be better for me to collect the local seed?  i.e. since this strain has had time to evolve to this particular environment?
 
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I seem to get better germination from seed that I  collect myself and then store as best I can. Wait till long after the flower dries up and seeds form, though
 
pollinator
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Re the original question about plant identification. I use ‘Plantsnap’ on my phone which does a good job of identifying plants from photos.
 
James Freyr
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Jennifer Lowery wrote: Would it be better for me to just buy that or would it be better for me to collect the local seed?  i.e. since this strain has had time to evolve to this particular environment?



I think you nailed it Jennifer! The variety you have already growing in your lawn is adapted to your particular environment, and the name for these locally adapted varieties is landrace. That landrace clover in your lawn has survived and thrived and saving this seed to sow elsewhere on your property will yield good results.
 
Gray Henon
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I prefer crimson clover for a cover crop.  White clover is fairly persistent and can compete with small garden plants, whereas the crimson rarely comes back in zone 7 unless replanted.   I have had good luck planting clover around labor day, but it does require a bit of irrigation if it is dry.
 
pollinator
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Hey Jennifer. You asked about an app for identifying plants. I've been using one called Flora Incognita with good results. It's the first one I've liked. You can also use it to record observations, and I've just discovered they have an app called Flora Capture meant for that, so I'm going to try that out too.
 
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