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Harvesting and cooking Japanese knotweed

 
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Location: Cleveland Ohio
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Enjoy.
 
gardener
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There are real medicinal properties of Japanese Knotweed.   It is currently the commercially used source for resveratrol, one of the most heralded supplements for health and longevity. Just make sure that what you're eating isn't poisoned to stop its invasiveness.
JohN S
PDX OR
 
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i would like to try this once it is in season

https://www.eddmaps.org/ontario/distribution/viewmap.cfm?sub=19655
 
pollinator
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I have tried to eat the stuff once and only once. it is seriously sour like rhubarb I tried the new shoots around 6 inches tall, and soaked in sugar it would probably be edible perhaps the blanching in the video gets rid of some of the sourness.
 
John Suavecito
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I have read that you can make the root into something like a supplement.  It is a food.  Perhaps it can be chopped up into small enough bits that you can add it to something bland like beans or rice and it will add needed flavor in small enough but frequent amounts.
John S
PDX OR
 
pollinator
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I love knotweed,  it's like a slightly lemony asparagus.   Delicious.
 
pollinator
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Just a short cautionary note - japanese knotweed is rich in oxalic acid, and anyone who have suffered kidney stones in the past should limit their intake of foods high in this compound.

https://pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?LatinName=Polygonum+japonicum

Just in case you decide to try to eat that big patch to the ground!  :)
 
M. Phelps
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does anyone know the name of the other plant he uses with the roundish leaf which you can see at the bottom of the screen in the video (before you hit play)
i think it grows here as well
 
Jeesun Pak
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The roundish leaf is Petasites japonicus.
Koreans eat the steamed leaves, wrap the cooked rice seasoned with miso and Korean hot paste (gochujang).
 
pollinator
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Looking forward to trying it this year. It's just started to emerge from it's slumber.

I have heard Japanese knotweed is used for lyme disease too. It's fascinating how many medicinal plants are invasive.

https://www.facebook.com/thesacredscience/videos/episode-5-the-silent-epidemic-lyme-disease-interview-with-stephen-buhner/303508987138634/
 
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M. Phelps wrote:does anyone know the name of the other plant he uses...



Hmm...Doesn't look quite the same as Coltsfoot.
 
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