• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Nicole Alderman
stewards:
  • Mike Haasl
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • John F Dean
  • Rob Lineberger
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • Ash Jackson
  • Jordan Holland

How quick does sourdough bounce back? Or does it?

 
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've been neglecting my sourdough.
Left it on the counter for a week and completely forgot about it a couple times.
Re fed it yesterday.
No growth though. :(

How quick will it bounce back?
 
gardener
Posts: 986
Location: Western Washington
256
duck forest garden personal care rabbit bee homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
How warm is the area it is in? How wet is it? The warmer and wetter the faster it should come back, though it may get taken over by "bad" yeast. I've never had that happen but hear that it's an eventuality, at least according to some books
 
Samantha Buller-Kormos
Posts: 45
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
House is usually 17-19 degrees.
It looks as though it should be wetter than it is. I might have to add some more water.
I fed it yesterday but it doesn't smell as sour as it should and it's not growing and falling like it usually does.
 
pollinator
Posts: 360
Location: Southern Germany
175
kids books urban chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts bee
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You could also try taking only a little of the lazy sourdough (like half a teaspoon) and then feed that in a new jar. Maybe the residues of the old sourdough slow down the startup.
Some people add a little honey to a lazy sourdough, but I have not tried it myself.

What I would do in any case is put the jar over/under a hot water bottle, wrapped up in some towel for several hours. The ambient temp might be too low.
 
gardener
Posts: 1813
Location: South of Capricorn
705
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I let my sourdough get neglected all the time. Pour off the liquid, dump out half, feed. Try it again. Sometimes mine takes a few times before it stops being grumpy. (that said- my sourdough is crazy, I keep it in the fridge and it is still very active in there!)
 
Posts: 32
Location: 5000' Albuquerque, NM
16
hugelkultur forest garden building rocket stoves woodworking greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If your sourdough is weak and not contaminated, you have lots of options. Here are three more tricks that can be combined or tried in succession to add more natural yeast to a weak starter:
1) Use 1/2 c rye flour in your starter instead of wheat
2) Put 1/2 c rye berries in water over night and use the soaking water
3) Put 1/2 c organic raisins in water over night and use the soaking water
Add the soaked rye berries to your bread. Add more water to the raisins and let them ferment a day or two longer. Add the fermented raisins, walnuts and a couple of teaspoons of cinnamon to your bread (sweet, no sugar needed).
Enjoy!
 
gardener & author
Posts: 2009
Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
434
trees food preservation solar greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've killed sourdough several times by leaving it out too long. Currently I am not keeping a sourdough (after 6 weeks away and I could only ask the housesitting housemate to water the garden and keep up with other essentials, so I didn't ask him to feed and tend the sourdough).

I've been getting very nice results from making bread with only a tiny amount of commercial dry yeast and very long rise times. It comes out tasting much like a decent sourdough bread.
gift
 
Diego Footer on Permaculture Based Homesteads - from the Eat Your Dirt Summit
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic