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Easiest animal to raise to get some kind of cheese

 
pollinator
Posts: 270
Location: Nevada
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I would like to find an animal that is relatively small and easy to care for so that I can get some milk..but most importantly, to get some cheese.  Ideally, something like cottage cheese, cream cheese and mozarella - those kinds of cheeses.  Would only be for 2 people. Any ideas?  
 
pollinator
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A goat!
 
Posts: 100
Location: KY
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Are you ok with having multiple animals and breeding them to be able to milk the mother?

Have you researched just how much milk you can take and when to ensure the baby is doing fine? And how much will be available per goat for your uses?

Also, after several years you might end up with a population greater than you would like - unless you plan to sell or slaughter for meat.

These are all things I have tried to consider and still working the ideas around because a tiny heard of goats can be more beneficial than just the milk/cheese. (I'm a vegetarian so no meat slaughter/sales for me) I am interested in them being my brush maintenance crew too
 
Tom Connolly
pollinator
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Hmmm Good points!  Costco's cheese prices are starting to look pretty good!
 
Mother Tree
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If you can find a goat from a good milking strain that has already had a kid, she should be able to keep milking for several years if you keep taking the milk. It's a good way to get into things.
 
pollinator
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In my research, it depends on what you consider easy, and what your land looks like. Goats challenge fencing, so if you can't afford good fencing it might not be your best option. Dairy cows do better with flattish land, and better pasture. I've heard that sheep can be skittish milkers, so if you don't have previous milking experience., maybe not the best option.
 
master pollinator
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Please keep in mind as well, animals are social creatures. Having a lone animal is cruel in my mind.
 
pollinator
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The cheeses you listed are all fresh cheeses(ie, no aging, molding, etc.), relatively easy to make -  you may find the "fun factor" sufficient in making them, even if you still buy the milk/cream.  the savings will be minimal, but the fun of learning, and satisfaction of success is definitely still worth it.
 
gardener
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Hi Tom;  
Your getting good advice about goats and fencing, as well as the need for at least 2 animals.
Have you ever made cheese before?  I have and its great fun!
However, in the beginning it is easy to mess up and make a sour batch. Happens to everybody, just a learning curve.
I suggest acquiring some fresh raw milk , goat or cow or sheep for that matter.  
Try your hand at making cheese before you buy the cow... Much easier to decide if you like it first. (I think you will)
The cheeses you mentioned are easy ones and you will probably succeed and absolutely love your own fresh made cheese!  
 
gardener & author
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How easy an animal is to care for can change a lot. If they are good quality animals raised in a way that allows them to express their natural behaviour, fed a diet with the nutrients they need, it's often easy, but not always.

My book on goats can be read for free with a trial of kindle unlimited and will give you an idea of what's involved in keeping dairy goats: https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B07RSHKPRL/ref=tmm_kin_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1579123806&sr=8-1
 
Acetylsalicylic acid is aspirin. This could be handy too:
Permaculture Voices 1, 2 and 3 - all 117 hours of video!
https://permies.com/t/voices123
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