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From critter to spinning wheel...

 
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I have Nigora goats with beautiful wool, that I'm looking forward to playing with, later, this year. But, all the information I'm finding about the process skips the steps I'm least confident about! I've already learned much about caring for the goats, though there is still MUCH to learn, and I know the basic processes of carding and a few ways of turning roving into felt, and a bit less about getting it spun. My knowledge in these things is limited, but usable, and a great jumping off point, for experimentation and playtime. And, I'm probably going to hire someone to shear them...

BUT!!! Getting the wool ready for carding? I'm pretty sure there's a lot more to it than take it from the shearer, throw it in the washing machine, air dry, and start carding! I remember seeing videos of folks throwing wool into a wire bin, on what amounts to a spit, and spinning the debris out. I more recently watched one, as someone did, in fact, throw the wool into a washing machine! But, I can well imagine the mess that machine must have been in, upon removing it - a little something they left out of the video, 'for the sake of brevity'.

So, what stepsdo you go through, to get your wool from freshly shorn, to roving, in as much detail as you are willing/able to give, please? (Thank you, from the bottom of my heart, in advance!!!💜💜💜💜)
 
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Very loosely

Step one: evaluate the fibre (the link is for wool, but there's a lot that can transfer to goat fibre)

Step two: skirt - throw away the crappy stuff (by crappy, I mean the stuff so coated in poo that it's useless.

Step three:  sort the fibre.  The fibre usually isn't consistent throughout the body.  Leg fibre is usually coarser, neck fibre usually finer but messy.  Back fibre is usually shorter and brittle due to sun damage....  Decide if you are going to blend all these types together (probably best when just starting out unless the fibre is extremely different)  or if you want to separate them out to make different things.  

Step four: Pick.  Remove debris and detritus while trying to keep the lock structure intact.  

Step five: decide about washing.  Does it need washing and how much washing do you want to do?  Is it going to felt quickly - so needs to be washed with more care?  

Step six: wash (if needed)

Step seven: get ready for carding.  
 
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r ranson wrote:Very loosely

Step one: evaluate the fibre (the link is for wool, but there's a lot that can transfer to goat fibre)

Step two: skirt - throw away the crappy stuff (by crappy, I mean the stuff so coated in poo that it's useless.

Step three:  sort the fibre.  The fibre usually isn't consistent throughout the body.  Leg fibre is usually coarser, neck fibre usually finer but messy.  Back fibre is usually shorter and brittle due to sun damage....  Decide if you are going to blend all these types together (probably best when just starting out unless the fibre is extremely different)  or if you want to separate them out to make different things.  

Step four: Pick.  Remove debris and detritus while trying to keep the lock structure intact.  

Step five: decide about washing.  Does it need washing and how much washing do you want to do?  Is it going to felt quickly - so needs to be washed with more care?  

Step six: wash (if needed)

Step seven: get ready for carding.  



Fantastic! THANK YOU!!! I knew there was a lot more to it, than I was finding! About step six? Washing it is feeling kinda intimidating, honestly. It's there an easiest (my preference, lol) best/worst method? A best/worst soap - or none at all? I've pretty much figured, based on my wet felting, that air drying would be best - but, I'm at a loss, on the washing.
 
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Carla Burke wrote:It's there an easiest (my preference, lol) best/worst method?



I washed mine in laundry nets, in the bath tub. Lukewarm water and dish soap. Rinsed carefully and dried in the sun. It was sheep wool. Carding was a very slow process so I eventually decided to skip it entirely ;) and it was still nice (although the yarn is a bit more "artistic").
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YAASSSSS!!! Thank you, both, Flora & r ranson! I'm far more likely to play with felting, this year, than spinning, and this will get me to it so much faster than I'd feared!!

I'd love more input, on other ways, too, if anyone else has other methods, they'd not shared yet, too! I think the more info we can collect, they more accessible this kind of endeavor will be, for everyone!
 
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