• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Mike Haasl
  • James Freyr
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Kate Downham
  • Jay Angler
  • thomas rubino

Hello! From a city person who'd love to move somewhere less crowded

 
Posts: 71
Location: Poland
19
purity dog forest garden tiny house urban books fiber arts writing sheep homestead
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've been looking for advice in this forum many times, but never registered or wrote anything! Until I did, and then I received Paul's hilarious daily-ish email, and "What would Pearl invent if it wasn't invented already?" totally made my day!
Currently I live in a too big and too dirty city in southwest Poland, and I have a garden which is too small.
If the city was smaller and the garden bigger, I'd have goats, sheep, ponies, chickens, cows, pigs, bees, ducks, rabbits, and pet rats.
But I only have a dog (who is absolutely mad) and a number of wild critters who choose to inhabit the tiny garden where I also grow food.
I'm trying to be an ethical omnivore because I believe that plants can also have senses and feelings, like us and animals, and even the things that are not alive can also be alive in a certain way (I'm actually planning to make some art about it; because I'm an artist).
Good to meet you all and I hope that Paul will keep spamming me with these wonderful emails!
 
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 4162
Location: SW Missouri
1629
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Haha! Welcome to Permies! I'm flattered you liked my silly thread :) Lots of neat things here, good to have to join us!
:D
Pearl
 
pollinator
Posts: 1734
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
634
forest garden rabbit tiny house books solar woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Welcome , Flora. Hope to see you around the forums.
 
Posts: 143
9
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Flora,

have you read: the secret life of plants?

i too believe plants have more senses than we give them credit for

i do not have a huge income so my plan was to buy land where it was affordable
then build over a period of years
 
gardener
Posts: 2778
Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
493
cat pig rocket stoves
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Welcome Flora:  Sounds like you will fit in around here !
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 4162
Location: SW Missouri
1629
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

M. Phelps wrote:

have you read: the secret life of plants?

i too believe plants have more senses than we give them credit for


I read that book many years ago, and I definitely think plants respond to good intentions. I was at the Denver Botanical Garden with my sister, who thinks I'm a flake. There was a plant wired up to a biofeedback type sensor with an audio output. She poked the plant, nothing happened. I petted it, told it it was beautiful, commiserated with it about being on display for people who didn't care. The audio output was purring. The plant liked me.
 
gardener
Posts: 1019
Location: South of Capricorn
331
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Welcome, Flora!

I`m another person in a big, nasty urban area with a small garden that takes up my entire backyard. We fantasize about moving somewhere to get a bigger piece of land out in the country (maybe once my kid is settled in college and my husband gets rid of his business), or maybe just in the meantime buying another plot of land to put some fruit trees on (I am totally at capacity right now, filled to bursting, no more space for trees). I have one similarly nutty dog and two rabbits, who make excellent manure and have become an essential part of my garden. I never really thought I had space for them but they turn out to fit in perfectly (they have their hutches and spend dry days in runs in the garden, eating the weeds on the paths and generally just hanging out, jumping around, DIGGING HOLES [how could i forget, it's their favorite activity], and napping).
 
Posts: 485
Location: Abkhazia · Cfa (humid subtropical)
54
cat forest garden trees solar wood heat woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello Flora,

what are your requirements?

Right now we have a cat and a dog, with plans for bees, ducks and goats (once the garden is really well fenced off…). The neighbors have pigs who love to dig in our garden and cows who love to graze there. There are horses around too.
(More details here)
 
Flora Eerschay
Posts: 71
Location: Poland
19
purity dog forest garden tiny house urban books fiber arts writing sheep homestead
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello everyone, and thank you for your warm welcome! I must admit that I forgot forums after the last one died (about sighthounds - which my dog is). But I will like it here!

Tereza Okava wrote:I have one similarly nutty dog and two rabbits, who make excellent manure and have become an essential part of my garden. I never really thought I had space for them but they turn out to fit in perfectly (they have their hutches and spend dry days in runs in the garden, eating the weeds on the paths and generally just hanging out, jumping around, DIGGING HOLES [how could i forget, it's their favorite activity], and napping).



Ooh that's what I want to have! I imagine that one would be albino with standard coat (there is a super hardy breed which was bred for meat and white fur), and the other would be a black angora (their long coat is actually greyish, but face is short haired and black). They would look so cool together! But I heard that it's not so easy to make them like each other... both must be young (at which age it's hard to determine sex) and preferably male and female, spayed/neutered if you're not planning to breed them (I'd love to, but not where I live now).

I even made a collage to visualize how they would look like - background is a photo of my garden. I'm also worried that the angora would need too much grooming... not that I'm lazy but I imagine the horror stories of matted wool getting overlooked and nasty...

collage.jpg
[Thumbnail for collage.jpg]
 
gardener
Posts: 513
Location: Piedmont 7a
165
hugelkultur trees woodworking
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Welcome Flora, I like your collage!  It is like a vision board or dream board - if you visualize it, you will achieve it!  Sometimes the first step is to articulate the vision, and then you know what you want to work toward.
 
Tereza Okava
gardener
Posts: 1019
Location: South of Capricorn
331
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I thought the same thing about the vision board!
I was also on a sighthound forum years ago, when I had a whippet (skinnydog). Practically a lifetime ago!!!

I was hoping to have two bunnies that would enjoy each other's company but I didn't realize that bunnies came with their own personalities (and it turns out the one really isn't too friendly with the other. but that's okay.)

I love your woven fences. What are you growing in your garden?
 
Flora Eerschay
Posts: 71
Location: Poland
19
purity dog forest garden tiny house urban books fiber arts writing sheep homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Tereza Okava wrote:I was hoping to have two bunnies that would enjoy each other's company but I didn't realize that bunnies came with their own personalities (and it turns out the one really isn't too friendly with the other. but that's okay.)



There is a method that worked for many of my other animals, but I never tried it on bunnies: make them have a "bad experience" together. For example, put both in a transporter and take them for a ride on a bumpy road, to a vet, to some scary places, etc. When they return, they're very likely to be best friends! It works on humans too. Actually, it's a plot of many movies in which two enemies go through some trouble together and they're friends in the end.
I learned it from my horse riding trainer, who always did this when two horses didn't like each other. He'd put them in a trailer and take them on a crazy ride they'll come out terrified but BFF.

I love your woven fences. What are you growing in your garden?



Food! Or, I'm trying. Seems like I killed all my pitaya cacti when I moved them to new pots I don't have a proper sand for them, to mix with soil. I grew them from seeds from a fruit and they were developing so nicely now I'm just watching them die one by one and I'm helpless. They're in the house of course. Outside, I have wild roses, pumpkins, topinambur, wild strawberries, berries, pears, mulberry, some leafy edibles etc. Whatever grows here (it's zone 6 I think...) but the garden isn't very big and I don't have animals that would provide more fertilizer. In spring I'll take wool from my cousin who has sheep and I'll use some for spinning (I have a support spindle) and the rest as mulch (the wool is a waste, so they don't care much for quality but I always find some nice parts, and the dirty stuff is great as mulch).
 
Oh, sure, you could do that. Or you could eat some pie. While reading this tiny ad:
Permaculture Technology Jamboree: June 29th-July 10th, 2020, Wheaton Labs
https://permies.com/wiki/permaculture-tech-2020
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!