• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
stewards:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • John F Dean
  • Carla Burke
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • Leigh Tate
  • thomas rubino

New Flowers Forum!

 
gardener
Posts: 1962
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
746
forest garden fish fungi trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Likes 18
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We've got a new Flowers forum!

https://permies.com/f/379/flowers

Flowers have lots of benefits in permaculture, like plant breeding, adding beauty and fragrance to the landscape, attracting pollinators and other beneficial insects, repelling pests, and also they're just so purty!
 
pollinator
Posts: 116
Location: Western MA, zone 6b
31
dog forest garden urban
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Wonderful!
 
pollinator
Posts: 4958
1154
transportation duck trees rabbit tiny house chicken earthworks building woodworking
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oh we love flowers here on Permies!

6.JPG
Oh we love flowers here on Permies!
Oh we love flowers here on Permies!
 
pollinator
Posts: 229
Location: Gulf Islands BC (zone 8)
76
hugelkultur goat forest garden chicken fiber arts medical herbs
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
And you can eat (some of) them!
 
Travis Johnson
pollinator
Posts: 4958
1154
transportation duck trees rabbit tiny house chicken earthworks building woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yep, like Chive...goes good on a salad, in a grilled tuna, sprinkled on salmon, and has a nice pretty bloom to it as well!
 
Andrea Locke
pollinator
Posts: 229
Location: Gulf Islands BC (zone 8)
76
hugelkultur goat forest garden chicken fiber arts medical herbs
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I planted dahlias this year for the first time as the tubers are supposed to be edible, but became smitten with the flowers and have not eaten a single tuber, LOL. I still have a few going strong with the flowers so I will take some photos later today and start a new thread about them.

Sunchokes are another one with decent flowers and edible tubers. I think maybe starting a thread on edible flowers would be a good idea. Will do that in a while, if no one beats me to it :)
 
gardener
Posts: 534
Location: N. California
191
hugelkultur kids cat dog fungi trees books chicken cooking medical herbs ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I get great joy out of growing veggies, and there is nothing like picking fruit off a tree and eating it right there, but for me there is something very special about flowers.  I could probably get kicked off the permies sight for saying this, but if I had to choose just one it would be flowers, no question.  They are beautiful, and many smell wonderful.  Pansy's always make me think of my grandma,  my mom loved carnations and gladiolus, and my mother-in-law loved and grew gardenia.  For some reason these flowers always make me feel closer to all these amazing lady's that are no longer with me.  
You will find all sorts of flowers all over our yard.  Roses mostly in the rose garden, eatable and beneficial flowers, like marigold, nasturtiums, and zinnia's just to name a few grow in the veggie garden.  Flower gardens, and containers with flowers in them seem to pop up everywhere.  I simply love flowers!  They give me joy and I enjoy sharing them with others.  I enjoy shopping a the thrift store, or yard sale, or where ever for inexpensive containers I can put flowers in and give them to friends and family.  Money is very tight for our family, so I can't give much, but when I give flowers, no matter if its a huge boque of roses, or 1 sunflower,  the person always seems so thrilled.  The smiles and joy I receive are worth every weed I pull, and then some.
dahlia.jpg
dahlia
dahlia
tall-sunflowers.jpg
tall sunflowers
tall sunflowers
rose-garden.jpg
rose garden
rose garden
 
Jen Fulkerson
gardener
Posts: 534
Location: N. California
191
hugelkultur kids cat dog fungi trees books chicken cooking medical herbs ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sorry it's my first time uploading pictures, and I'm excited I actually did it, but they seem very big.  I will have to have one of my kids help me next time
 
gardener
Posts: 3480
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1257
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Jen Fulkerson wrote:

Sorry it's my first time uploading pictures, and I'm excited I actually did it, but they seem very big.  I will have to have one of my kids help me next time

I *love* the big pictures. They allow me to see the details which are beautiful.
(but alas, I'm sure the electron pushers would prefer them smaller.)
 
pollinator
Posts: 286
Location: Ozarks
68
homeschooling goat dog tiny house chicken cooking building solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Plus they're money makers. A lot of people running high tunnels end up growing flowers along with or instead of veggies. We've been slowly collecting whatever flowers we can just to get some color other than green and white on the property. We have flowering native trees and brambles but they all flower white. My end goal is to have a few different colors most of the year. Either flowers blooming or different colored foliage. Right now, most things have leaves that go yellow in Fall. I want some orange, red & marroon.

Paradise should taste AND look good.
 
Andrea Locke
pollinator
Posts: 229
Location: Gulf Islands BC (zone 8)
76
hugelkultur goat forest garden chicken fiber arts medical herbs
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

John Pollard wrote:Plus they're money makers. A lot of people running high tunnels end up growing flowers along with or instead of veggies. We've been slowly collecting whatever flowers we can just to get some color other than green and white on the property. We have flowering native trees and brambles but they all flower white. My end goal is to have a few different colors most of the year. Either flowers blooming or different colored foliage. Right now, most things have leaves that go yellow in Fall. I want some orange, red & marroon.

Paradise should taste AND look good.



"They're money makers" - exactly! We are planning to use cut flowers to supplement our income during the years that our nut trees, which will be the long-term commercial crop, get up to speed. I have planted a whole lot of tulips and daffodils in my vegetable beds on the existing property this fall, to get prepared to produce income next spring. We will have a farm stand at the new property where we will be able to sell these. Those, and eggs, will likely be the main farm products ready to go in the coming spring, other than value-added things like goats milk soap. In future years, we will have a number of perennial crops (fiddleheads, asparagus) that can be harvested in spring. I considered planting peonies as well but am running out of space as the present property, other than where I've built soil, is about 2-3 inches of soil over bedrock and/or covered in native forest and on a 25 degree slope.

So, our thoughts for flowering money makers that can grow in the alleys between chestnuts and other nut trees, or in the rows of trees, are:

Spring - Daffodils (and to a lesser extent tulips, as the tall ones do not naturalize well)
         - Peonies
         - Flowering shrubs (cut and force the branches) - eg. lilac, maybe honeysuckle?

Summer - Heritage varieties of roses
          - Daylilies? (mainly because I really like them, but not sure if these are big cut-flower winners)

Late summer/fall - Dahlias


We will almost certainly have others as well once we get going but these come to mind as being perennial, relatively low maintenance, and fairly flashy so they are likely to be popular with the flower-buying public. I also have 60 basket willows growing in pots that will be planted out at the new place, and could add cuttings of those for a flash of colour to any flower arrangements, although perhaps they are more valuable for basketry. I got a couple of curly willow cuttings for free this year too, and they will eventually grow into mid-sized trees and cuttings from those can also be used to add to flower arrangements.

I must admit that I myself never buy flowers, so my opinions on this subject may not be well informed.

Any thoughts? What do others grow for farm-gate sales, or buy from farms?


 
Andrea Locke
pollinator
Posts: 229
Location: Gulf Islands BC (zone 8)
76
hugelkultur goat forest garden chicken fiber arts medical herbs
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jen Fulkerson wrote:Sorry it's my first time uploading pictures, and I'm excited I actually did it, but they seem very big.  I will have to have one of my kids help me next time



Jen, those are beautiful!
 
Posts: 664
Location: Australia, New South Wales. Köppen: Cfa (Humid Subtropical), USDA: 10/11
2
transportation hugelkultur cat forest garden fish trees urban chicken cooking woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Due to ongoing droughts, very hot summers, and water restrictions, I've removed the traditional European/Americas/Chinese flower gardens and put most of them into pots e.g. standard roses.

Exceptions are deep rooted ones like Camélia and Gardenia.

Besides using more indigenous plants. A bit of an experiment was replacing them with flowering succulents and those related to cactus and bromeliad.

So far the succulents are powering ahead with exceptionally long lived flowers that close each night and reopen as sunlight hits them. The others remain in pots as the experiment continues - need to be fully sun tolerant, with very low water allocations, and near zero attention = borderline neglect.

succulent.jpg
succulent
succulent
purple-flowers.jpg
purple flowers
purple flowers
white-flowers.jpg
white flowers
white flowers
succulent-close-up.jpg
succulent close up
succulent close up
 
Travis Johnson
pollinator
Posts: 4958
1154
transportation duck trees rabbit tiny house chicken earthworks building woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Moneymakers...oh yes!

My Grandparents were the most self-sufficient people I know. They cut their own firewood, raised chickens, had laying hens, had cows that made butter that they sold, logged wood in the winter, had a huge garden, and had a greenhouse.

Of all of them, they said they made more money on the greenhouse than anything else!
 
Travis Johnson
pollinator
Posts: 4958
1154
transportation duck trees rabbit tiny house chicken earthworks building woodworking
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have always liked sunflowers, and I have a road that is about 1/2 mile long, and has a nice view. One year I plowed up a strip and had sunflowers growing in a row along beside that road. I have no pictures of it, but it was beautiful.

Last year a guy that hays my fields never bothered to hay a 2 acre field, so I thought about planting that in sunflowers. It would be pretty and I could use the sunflower seeds to heat my home. I think that is a cool use of the: have a beautiful field all summer with sunflowers, and heat my home in a sustainable way every year. Talk about dual stacking functions!

 
pollinator
Posts: 163
Location: Wichita, Kansas, United States
30
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Steve Thorn wrote:We've got a new Flowers forum!

https://permies.com/f/379/flowers

Flowers have lots of benefits in permaculture, like plant breeding, adding beauty and fragrance to the landscape, attracting pollinators and other beneficial insects, repelling pests, and also they're just so purty!



Am I the only wise guy who thinks with the last name Thorn, Steve should grow roses?
 
Phil Swindler
pollinator
Posts: 163
Location: Wichita, Kansas, United States
30
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If I understand correctly, there are two flowers called "MoonFlower".
One is little bitty and one is big.  Like salad plate big.
The big one smells wonderful.
I wish my wife would find a perfume that smells like the big Moonflowers.
 
Steve Thorn
gardener
Posts: 1962
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
746
forest garden fish fungi trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Phil Swindler wrote:Am I the only wise guy who thinks with the last name Thorn, Steve should grow roses?



Every rose does have its thorn.

And I do like how they look look and smell.

I hope to plant some soon.
 
Posts: 318
Location: North Coast Dominican Republic
12
forest garden trees tiny house
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Dominicans love flowers! Even the poorer households usually have at least some flowers, either out front or in pots on the veranda, and the better off households might have nearly the whole yard in flowers. I find lots of zinnias, coleus, allamanda, frangipani, and many whose identities I do not know.
gift
 
100th Issue of Permaculture Magazine
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic