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Local substitutes of neem oil

 
Posts: 112
Location: Spain
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forest garden fungi urban
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Hi I'd like to find a substitute of neem oil that is local (to where I live)
Basically neem oil comes from India I guess, or south east Asia since it is a tropical/subtropical tree.
According to M. Phillips in his book "The Holistic Orchard" neem oil is described as an insect repellent, and inhibitor of molting cycles of various pest species...The constituents of unalterated neem oil that  play a huge role in countering disease are the immune stimulants and the fatty acids (page 143).

What other substances are there that can easily be found/produced, say in Europe, may have similar characteristics and can substitute neem oil?
 
pollinator
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Products that have gained a lot of popularity out here and largely replaced neem oil are based on corn oil, soap, and isopropyl alcohol. One apparently popular example you can see online is called "green cleaner".
One place to start might be asking why you use neem? What effect are you looking to replicate?
 
Antonio Scotti
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Thanks S. Lowe
well the effect is described in the sentence from the book I quoted: disease and pest prevention mainly
 
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Hi

Is your part of spain warm enough to grow neem?
It's a beautiful tree and fast growing.
My father's property in the caribbean was full of neem and we didn't notice any decline in the mosquito population.
In florida there is a neem company called "neem tree farms". Their website has gobs of information. They sell seeds.

 
s. lowe
pollinator
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Antonio Scotti wrote:Thanks S. Lowe
well the effect is described in the sentence from the book I quoted: disease and pest prevention mainly



I think that in addition to the various other plant oils like corn and soybean that can 'smother' the insects, you can get the disease and pest prevention effect from compost teas and KNF style plant juice ferments. Alfalfa, nettle, and comfrey have pretty solid growth promoting and health enhancing qualities. Also insect frass teas can help stimulate plants natural immune defense systems against bugs.
 
master pollinator
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During a night-time New Year's event, our landlord in Cebu Philippines started several smoking fires that contained neem leaves. This was effective in keeping mosquitoes away.

Even if you are not in a place where a large neem could bear oily seeds, you still might be able to keep some smaller specimens in pots that can come inside during cold weather.

If a house has a bad insect infestation, the windows and doors can be closed and some neem can be burned in tin cans, to smoke them out. I assume this leave the house a bit stinky, but if something is eating your house, this might be the lesser evil.

One man mentioned spraying neem oil on bamboo interior partition walls, to deter insects that might bore into it.
 
Antonio Scotti
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Alfalfa, nettle, and comfrey have pretty solid growth promoting and health enhancing qualities


S. Lowe, yes by all means, only that they seem to be useful in other moments or stages of the orchard year.
M. Phillips suggests to spray neem oil + liquid fish + compost tea when half of the tree leaves are on the ground, in order to smother fungal spores that attach to decomposing leaves and stimulate the activity of beneficial bacteria and deter other harmful "beasts" that dwell in the tree trunk. Each type of spray has a specific function or more than one.
 
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Melia azaderach, or Persian prayer bead tree is a relative of Neem, my rabbits and hens like to eat the leaves, I believe some people use them (dried) as an anti parasite on larger animals...?
 
geraint britton
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geraint britton wrote:Melia azaderach, or Persian prayer bead tree is a relative of Neem, my rabbits and hens like to eat the leaves, I believe some people use them (dried) as an anti parasite on larger animals...?


See pfaf. org... Plants for a Future, based in Cornwall UK
 
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