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Bees' nest in my compost heap

 
pollinator
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Location: Hamburg, Germany
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I currently have (too many) compost heaps in part of my Kleingarten, and one appears to be hosting an active bees' nest.  I tried to take pictures but failed.  To my naive eyes they look like honeybees - standard yellow/black stripes, "normal" bee-shaped body - but I assume they're not.  Definitely not wasps/hornets/bumblebees.  They aren't aggressive, though they're not thrilled with me getting too close.  

I'd be happy to leave them to their pollinating, but I want to tear down these compost heaps and lay out raised beds for next spring.

Will they move on their own?  When might I expect that?  If not, when is the least-worst time and way to tear down the compost heap?  Can I offer them someplace else?

Many thanks in advance!
 
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if they are honey bees, you might think about getting a bee suit and building a hive box to move them into, just bee sure they are not yellow jackets, do some googling, keeping bees is a rewarding hobby in its own rite. depending on where you are your local extension agent may be of assistance. i recently read how the state of virginia will give bees and assistance to anyone in the state that wants to keep bees, produce honey ect.
 
steward
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Location: woodland, washington
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without seeing a photo, I would guess a Vespa of some sort. most Vespa colonies are annual in temperate climates like yours and die out over the winter, so that could be a good time to tear down the pile.
 
Morfydd St. Clair
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Thank you, tel and bruce!  I'll try to get a better picture, but for now work on the assumption they'll die out in the winter.  
 
bruce Fine
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honey bees dont die in winter, they huddle together to keep warmth and feed off stores of honey.
honey bees are amazing
 
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