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not another yarn blog (spinning, weaving, and natural dyeing)

 
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and another one
quail.JPG
quail
quail
 
r ranson
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Yesterday's colour inspiration, an apple blossom.
(stay tuned for more photos!)
dye-table-set-up.jpg
dye table set up
dye table set up
 
r ranson
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it progresses
apple-blossom-dye-pot.jpg
apple blossom dye pot
apple blossom dye pot
 
r ranson
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beautiful!
cherry-blossom-lambs-wool.jpg
cherry blossom lambs wool
cherry blossom lambs wool
cherry-blossom-dyed-yarn.jpg
cherry blossom dyed yarn
cherry blossom dyed yarn
 
r ranson
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further adventures in dyeing
yarn-50.jpg
strawberry short cake
strawberry short cake
 
pollinator
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Sorry to hear about the shearing and wool. It's been crazy all around and though I was worried, I'm glad I got mine shorn end of February and didn't have my 'usual' date, which would have been right when the panic started in my area.
The bright side of not getting usable fleece is that the sheep always grow more! But it's always a shame to lose out on the hard work.
 
r ranson
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FINALLY, the weather is friendly to drying fleece.

I've got a lot of wool to wash, but I took some time to play with dyeing experiments for my etsy shop too.
yarn-71.jpg
cake dyed yarn
cake dyed yarn
yarn-72.jpg
fleece drying in the sun
fleece drying in the sun
yarn-73.jpg
just look at those soft curls!
just look at those soft curls!
 
r ranson
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I have been blogging again

I'm going to try to keep that blog to one a week or less and try to keep the content more tutorial or educational.  So I'll still be 'blogging' here a lot more often.
 
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How should someone go about subscribing to your blog?
 
r ranson
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Carla Burke wrote:How should someone go about subscribing to your blog?



I wish I knew.  Most blogs automatically have a box that you can put your email in or an rrs feed.  

Anyone know weebly enough to help me find out where I can find these settings?
 
r ranson
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Carla Burke wrote:How should someone go about subscribing to your blog?



There should be one at the bottom of the screen now but I don't know if it works and it looks really ugly.  But it's been a long time since I could edit HTML code so I'm not sure how to fix it.  

The next entry is scheduled for Tuesday morning (my time) so if you want to test it, that would be awesome!
 
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One must click on R's link above. Then read through her wondrous prose. Then really quick, before you get distracted by the articles you must scroll past, whiz down to the bottom of the page. Here is where you will find the place to subscribe, right after the archive menu.

After submitting your email, you will find a confirmation to subscription in you inbox. Be sure to confirm!

I am subscribed. ๐Ÿ˜
 
Carla Burke
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r ranson wrote:

Carla Burke wrote:How should someone go about subscribing to your blog?



There should be one at the bottom of the screen now but I don't know if it works and it looks really ugly.  But it's been a long time since I could edit HTML code so I'm not sure how to fix it.  

The next entry is scheduled for Tuesday morning (my time) so if you want to test it, that would be awesome!


If you'll send me a reminder, I'd be happy to! Hubs is going on a boar hunt, so I'll be alone, and, other than the critters & chores, I'll be on my own schedule, instead of his AND mine, lol.
 
r ranson
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Are people able to find the "read more" button on the blog posts?
 
r ranson
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Also, would anyone be willing to test the comment feature to see if I got it working?  I tried to streamline it a bit more.
 
gardener
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r ranson wrote:Also, would anyone be willing to test the comment feature to see if I got it working?  I tried to streamline it a bit more.



It seemed to post, but still says 0 comments.   Maybe you are moderating?   But the poster gets no indication, and may think their post failed.  

I was on an Android phone.  

Suggestion: the last 2 paragraphs (Etsy and please comment) are a bit easy to miss, visually.  At least on the phone.
 
Kerry Rodgers
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Kerry Rodgers wrote:still says 0 comments.



I see it now, when I revisit.
 
r ranson
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I'm glad it worked.  I set it to be that people can publish right away and I review it later to remove spam.

I may regret it and have to switch to a spam filter system later.

Thanks for the feedback.  I don't have a phone to test on, so I'm glad to hear how to improve it.
 
Carla Burke
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Your most recent post showed 1 comment, and I was able to subscribe! YAY!!
 
r ranson
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Today my back hurt too much to continue working at home at my Day Job, so I turned off the computer and reorganized the studio, practised spinning on the wheel I borrowed for a tutorial I want to make, sorted and labelled the etsy inventory, and some huge fun photographing more stuff to sell in my shop.  

It was wonderful, if eery, to listen to the rain this late in the year.  The second year in a row that it rained in May!  Eventually, it got too damp even for me, and I lit the woodstove to take the edge off.  

yarn-81.jpg
Fibre in the morning light
Fibre in the morning light
yarn-82.jpg
learning the e-Spinner Super Jumbo which is ideal for this kind of yarn
learning the e-Spinner Super Jumbo which is ideal for this kind of yarn
 
r ranson
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well, it published.

but I didn't get an email.

https://www.crowinghen.ca/blog/how-to-spin-boucle-singles-from-wool-locks

Anyway, I'm setting the blog time for Tuesday Mornings.  I have the next three written and I'm hoping to keep on going with something every week.  
 
Joylynn Hardesty
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Hmmm... I didn't get a email either.
 
Joylynn Hardesty
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I got it! Gmail says:

Crowing Hen - crowing hen blog

May 20, 2020, 10:55 AM (21 hours ago)



Maybe thier bulk mailer gets clogged?



 
r ranson
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I'm kind of disappointed that the email had the whole blog entry - almost.

I would rather it had just the notification that there was a blog entry, then people would click and give my website some extra googlelove.

I could try the monkey mailing list again, but I would rather have something automated.  As it is, I've set the blog entries to publish on Tuesday mornings, but the system won't give me a link to the post until after it's published.  Which means, I can't set up an automated email to go out an hour after the post goes live, I would have to manually set it up after the liveness happens... and this is just way too stressful thinking about it.  
 
Carla Burke
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I did get an email, and it contained quite a bit of the post, but not all. The good thing in that is that it acts as a 'teaser'. If there's nothing from the blog post, in the email, I'm prone to decide I don't have time to click and read, because of the rest of the hundred or so emails sitting in my inbox, that I have the ridiculous compulsion to get through, every day. With that teaser, it's much more likely to get my interest piqued. I enjoyed the post, btw. Keep 'em coming!
 
Joylynn Hardesty
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I received the email at 9am yesterday. ๐Ÿ˜
 
r ranson
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i am thinking of making more fibre arts tutorials.

any requests?
 
r ranson
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I've been playing with a weave-a-long to help use up some extra yarn.  https://www.warpandweave.com/classes/stash-weave-along/

So I've chosen my colours and wound the warp.  But the fun choice is deciding which order to put the colours.  There's a fancy tool on the weave-a-long for that.  Here's some of what I came up with.

Same colours, same draft, just different orders.
scarf-a-long-yarn.JPG
handspun singles
handspun singles
draft-one.JPG
[Thumbnail for draft-one.JPG]
draft-two.JPG
[Thumbnail for draft-two.JPG]
 
r ranson
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On the loom and off again
Basically, I got insomnia and wove it in a night.  
wool-112.jpg
handspun scarf on the loom
handspun scarf on the loom
wool-113.jpg
finishing the fringe
finishing the fringe
 
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r ranson wrote:On the loom and off again
Basically, I got insomnia and wove it in a night.  



it's beautiful! ๐Ÿ˜

Re your blog, I subscribed and posted a comment, both seem to have gone well.

As for the read more tag, it's good that you included the "instructions" , else I would not have noticed it.

I'm glad to see you're blogging again, that also gives me a bit of momentum regarding my blog which I started then abandoned a year ago.
 
Maria Hoffmeister
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@r ranson

I forgot to ask: The big, beautiful grey skein that lies across the others, what did you dye it with? Or is it natural sheep colour?
 
r ranson
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Maria Hoffmeister wrote:@r ranson

I forgot to ask: The big, beautiful grey skein that lies across the others, what did you dye it with? Or is it natural sheep colour?



It is natural sheep grey.
 
r ranson
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New-old weaving project begun

This is a warp I measured and chained a few years ago.  It's US grown and processed, natural coloured cotton (undyed - cotton has a lot of non-white colours).  I think it's organic, but I'm not sure.  Anyway, it's a long warp for making at least a dozen towels.  
warp-flower.JPG
[Thumbnail for warp-flower.JPG]
warp-raddle.JPG
[Thumbnail for warp-raddle.JPG]
warp-chains.JPG
[Thumbnail for warp-chains.JPG]
 
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Hey r? Is the stick with nails part of the loom? What method will you use to make those towels?  I've gotten hold of most of the sticks for the backstrap im working towards.  It will be a new skill added to my repertoire when I finally Just Do It! I still need to cut them down to a manageable size. Any input on size? How large or small do you work a backstrap?

Appreciations in advance.
 
r ranson
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Cindy Haskin wrote:Hey r? Is the stick with nails part of the loom? What method will you use to make those towels?  I've gotten hold of most of the sticks for the backstrap im working towards.  It will be a new skill added to my repertoire when I finally Just Do It! I still need to cut them down to a manageable size. Any input on size? How large or small do you work a backstrap?

Appreciations in advance.



I'm going to weave this on my four-shaft floor loom.  The nail-stick is called a raddle and it's often used with multi-shaft looms.  It helps keep the warp spread out when putting it on the loom.  But not needed for backstrap weaving.


Backstrap weaving!
Oh, I love it!  Some of the simplest tools and yet, one of the most versatile weaving styles.  You can weave simple belts or complicated tapestry-like patterns.  And everything in between.  What I love most is that the weaver becomes part of the loom.  With every thread we add to woven cloth, it is like a photograph, freezing that moment in time.  The mood of the weaver, the light on the threads, the humidity, the temperature, the music... they all influence how the threads are placed.  The more complicated the loom, the less of the weaver is in the cloth, but with backstrap weaving, so much of the weaver is in the cloth, it's like a time capsule.  The only other weaving I've seen that comes as close as that is the weaving work of the Coast Salish people on the West coast of North America.  Here's a bit more about what handwoven means.

Okay, enough poetry.  This is my favourite tutorial for learning backstrap weaving.  She's absolutely an amazing teacher.

As for the length of the sticks, it depends on what you want to make.  My first project was weaving the backstrap part of the loom (I used a pillow before).  You can always cut the sticks shorter, but you cannot cut them longer.  You can also cut more sticks and make a smaller version to learn on.  Here's a thread about making your own loom.

 
r ranson
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The towels continue.

This warp got terribly tangled in storage so it was an exercise in patience to get it on the loom.  But after many breaks for yet more tea, and a bit of help, I managed to get it on the back beam.

So far no problems with tension while weaving.
warp-tangle-small.JPG
[Thumbnail for warp-tangle-small.JPG]
beaming-small.JPG
[Thumbnail for beaming-small.JPG]
warp-more-small.JPG
[Thumbnail for warp-more-small.JPG]
weaving-small.JPG
[Thumbnail for weaving-small.JPG]
 
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