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mending our clothes...do you?

 
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I appreciate beautiful painstaking mends although I don't have the patience to make them anymore.

....I thought these were particularly lovely, and so nicely subtle.

Unfortunately they were posted with no credits by someone who always puts a lot of effort into crediting every facebook picture.

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mend
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master gardener
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That almost looks like a "work of art" to disguise what actually needed mending, Judith! It's done as "weaving with needle and thread" rather than what we think of as "mending" in my house!
 
master gardener
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This link popped into my email inbox, this morning, and this thread was my first thought: https://pieceworkmagazine.com/piecework-fall-2020-call-for-submissions-mend-remake-and-renew/

It's a magazine subscription, but their fall publication is entitled 'Mend'. I thought it might interest more people than just me, lol
 
pollinator
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Great find, Carla! The Fall 2020 issue of Piecework on mending is out now! ETA: If your public library gives you access to RBdigital, see if you can check out the issue that way like I did. It looks like a fun issue! I'm especially excited about the article on kantha. I grew up in Bangladesh, calling it (the art) or them (the quilts) nakshi kantha, and love this method and these textiles. It's not at all dissimilar from sashiko and boro, although the stitches used are less often straight stitches as far as I can tell. Anyway, old saris are layered up and stitched together much like the zokin cleaning cloths in Japan that r mentions in her wonderful cleaning ebook. When I was little, I always escaped from our yard into the neighboring bari, and among the many things I loved watching was groups of women stitching these quilts (I also loved watching them make roti on special pans sort of like Mexican comals on their most-wonderful and obsession-worthy earthen stoves, especially since they always gave me some roti to eat).
 
pollinator
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I'd like to share this:
https://dieworkwear.com/2019/01/19/how-we-lost-our-ability-to-mend/
 
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May Lotito wrote:I'd like to share this:
https://dieworkwear.com/2019/01/19/how-we-lost-our-ability-to-mend/


That's an excellent article! Thank you!! :D

 
Beth Wilder
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May Lotito wrote:I'd like to share this:
https://dieworkwear.com/2019/01/19/how-we-lost-our-ability-to-mend/


Oh, that's like a love letter to mending, especially with all the great pictures! It's fantastic.

Mending -- especially visible mending -- has gotten very popular on social media the last few years, and now there are a few good books out on it.

One favorite, very basic/beginner in its techniques and explanations but just lovely, is Nina and Sonya Montenegro's Mending Life: A Handbook for Repairing Clothes and Hearts.



A great small-and-concentrated book that focuses on sashiko-style is Jessica Marquez's Make + Mend: sashiko-inspired embroidery projects to customize and repair textiles and decorate your home.



A beautiful, inspiring one with lots of boro style is Katrina Rodabaugh's Mending Matters: Stitch, Patch, and Repair Your Favorite Denim and More.



And a jaw-droppingly gorgeous book of mending as fine art is Claire Wellesley-Smith's Slow Stitch: Mindful and Contemplative Textile Art.



I highly recommend all of these, especially Mending Matters, and all the work that all these women do. (So please follow the links I attached to each of their names if you're interested!)
 
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I'll fix a ripped seam or sew on a button, but most of my mending is on jeans.  I love jeans and when I find a pair that fits just right, I won't give them up just because they have a hole or two.  When I was a kid, grandma would neatly patch all of my ripped knees with a colorful fabric or scrap of denim.  When I bought my first sewing machine, it had a darning plate and I started using that to fix holes.  Later I was selling military BDUs and saved a few of the beyond repair pants as patches too.  This past winter I finally threw away two pair of jeans that have served me well for over ten years.  I believe each pair had been patched at least three times and some of the patches even had patches.  I contemplated patching them a fourth time, but the denim was just getting too thin.  I've recently discovered sashiko and would like to give it a try.  Fortunately I have a few pair of jeans waiting for their first mending.
 
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For me, one of the worst issues with fast fashion is how so little is worth mending. The quality is so poor that a mend doesnt last enough time to make the mend worthwhile to do.

I used to mend my jeans, grew up doing it. By midway through university, the material had changed enough that by the time a section ripped in  pair of jeans (often the crotch, for me), the entire crotch area was so thin i couldnt mend it. Or i could, and did, but the repair would only last until the next wash or until the spot right next to the mend failed, buying me a few days to buy more jeans :( i developed ever more complicated ways of reinforcing that area before giving up. Same as tshirts. I put my thumb through a tshirt recently, the cotton is so delicate i promptly put a thumb through in another spot while i inspected the first spot for damage!

So those things i dont mend anymore, though i used to.

I do mend knit merino tops. Usually they need mending due to weak thread at a seam, or a catch, and will last plenty of time with a minor mend. I mend some leggings if they catch. I often restitch a sweater underarm seam . Small holes and rips in jackets, and other evidences of tiny accidents are worth mending. Dress clothes, blazers, yes. I have a dress in the mending pile where the seams came compleyely undone on part of the skirt at first wear so i need to redo all the seams. Its been in the pile for a while, but i will repair it. Gloves, and scarves? I mend them. Bras. Oh yeah, too expensive not to.

But commonly worn items, like underwear, socks, jeans, tshirts? The quality just isnt there these days to make it worth my time.
 
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I suppose you all know there's a BB for this. Or even more than one BB.
For the (new) straw badge BB on 'invisible mending' I did this. It's a dress (or tunic) I love wearing when riding my bicycle (with leggings, short or long depending on the weather). I don't know how it got those tiny holes, but as soon as I saw them, I decided to repair them, because I want to use this dress for many more years.

invisible mending

is it invisible of isn't it?

now I don't see it ...
 
pollinator
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Excellent posts on beatiful mending, and I appreciate the art of Katarina Rodabough!

But yesterday I did a much simpler mending job:

While I love that my husband is as frugal as me, I hate to see him switch into his "home" clothes after work which consist of a pair of jeans that is torn so much it exposes half his leg (I am not conservative or prudish, but it bothers me).
So I took them and started to stitch patches under the smaller rips. The huge one could only be mended by overstitching a bit patch. I also fixed the torn hems. No matching thread colours, this is still his around-the-house-and-work-in-the-garden jeans.
(And don't think he noticed yet, yesterday he used another one).

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torn jeans (the huge gap is not so obvious here)
torn jeans (the huge gap is not so obvious here)
jeans_nachher1.JPG
after
after
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detail
detail
 
Anita Martin
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Not sure if there is a better thread, but I haven't found one - so here I go...

I also took my old sweat pants that I use sometimes around the house to finally rip out the old waistband and add a broad yoga-style waistband.
The waist is low-cut so it not only exposes my lower back to cold, it also drags down all the time I keep rearranging it (if my hands are clean which they not always are).

I had some ribbing in the same colour (it is dark navy in reality, the pics are not true to the colour). It is some organic pure cotton so I overestimated the elasticity (rather: it is very elastic but does not pull back, does that make sense?).
So I ripped it out once and took out some centimeters - next best tool after a sewing machine is my seam ripper!
I suspect it might still be not tight enough but then I will insert a broad elastic.

So much better now! Well yes they look a bit like maternity pants but who cares?
I am planning on sewing some pyjama pants with the same waistband.

BTW, some people use the yoga-style waistband not because the pants sit too low, but because they are too high and have a too tight elastic (like here: https://mellysews.com/add-yoga-waistband-tutorial/)
I wonder why I haven't taken the time to make this adjustment earlier.


jogging1.JPG
sweatpants before
sweatpants before
jogging2.JPG
sweatpants after
sweatpants after
 
pollinator
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Anita Martin wrote:
next best tool after a sewing machine is my seam ripper!


I always use my seam ripper when I use my sewing machine, but have mislaid it so have only been doing hand sewing and mending lately;  hopefully I find it soon.  I have sewn so many things over the years and for almost every one of them I had to use the seam ripper!

Great fix, and on the jeans too.  
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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Anita Martin, if you go to the PEP forum, to PEP Textiles (https://permies.com/wiki/101129/pep-textiles/PEP-Badge-Textiles#833686) you'll see you can get a BB (Badge Bit) for your clothes repairs!
 
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