• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
stewards:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • John F Dean
  • Carla Burke
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • Leigh Tate
  • thomas rubino

NAP-system help, nut trees etc

 
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi.

Im designing an area and using the NAP system so far. The system as far as I can tell says Nitrogen fixer, Apple, Pear/Plum.
My question is where would nut trees fit into this? What about peaches, paw paws, kiwis etc? I guess peaches and paw paws both begin with the letter P.

Anything else you can teach me about the system? Can I interchange or replace other trees with the A or P letter?
Ive watched the movie beyond organic.
 
pollinator
Posts: 128
Location: KY
42
hugelkultur forest garden foraging food preservation ungarbage homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I too would like more knowledge on this...like maybe using 6 or more types of trees into the area to spread and diversify even more than just NAP.

I think another important part to consider in an orchard is the lower layering of bushy and ground cover (which can be edible producers too) and how to mix/match that along with tree types.

 
Eivind Djonne
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Ty Greene wrote:I too would like more knowledge on this...like maybe using 6 or more types of trees into the area to spread and diversify even more than just NAP.

I think another important part to consider in an orchard is the lower layering of bushy and ground cover (which can be edible producers too) and how to mix/match that along with tree types.


Good! Yes, I really like the idea of having grapes on the nitrogen fixing trees. That seems like a good idea.
 
gardener
Posts: 3054
Location: Central Texas zone 8a
712
cattle chicken bee sheep
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I like the idea of combining pecan with peaches. I am speaking of my climate.  I think a peach will be close to  end of usefullness about the same time a pecan would be large enough to shade it out and take its role as the central big tree.

With the wide spacing of pecans, this is a way to use that space and get a harvest as quick as a decade earlier vs waiting for just pecans to come of age.



 
gardener
Posts: 6687
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1340
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Eivind Djonne wrote:Hi.

Im designing an area and using the NAP system so far. The system as far as I can tell says Nitrogen fixer, Apple, Pear/Plum.
My question is where would nut trees fit into this? What about peaches, paw paws, kiwis etc? I guess peaches and paw paws both begin with the letter P.

Anything else you can teach me about the system? Can I interchange or replace other trees with the A or P letter?
Ive watched the movie beyond organic.



Where on the planet are you located? you didn't give us much information for giving you climate specific ideas.
Redhawk
 
Eivind Djonne
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Bryant RedHawk wrote:

Eivind Djonne wrote:Hi.

Im designing an area and using the NAP system so far. The system as far as I can tell says Nitrogen fixer, Apple, Pear/Plum.
My question is where would nut trees fit into this? What about peaches, paw paws, kiwis etc? I guess peaches and paw paws both begin with the letter P.

Anything else you can teach me about the system? Can I interchange or replace other trees with the A or P letter?
Ive watched the movie beyond organic.



Where on the planet are you located? you didn't give us much information for giving you climate specific ideas.
Redhawk



Im in Norway, Zone 4. Really looking for general ideas.
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Posts: 6687
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1340
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
General ideas could possibly not be viable, for instance, banana trees, mango, etc., would require a conservatory to be able to survive.
When your in a colder zone, such as zone 4 you should be looking for items that will fit the area, so the less general you are, the better your chances of success.

For your area you will need to select fruit trees that you know will grow and survive the winters.

for the N fixers just about any of them will do nicely, you might also want to look into some of the N fixers that are also mineral miners such as Lucerne and comfrey for those areas out near the drip lines of the fruit trees.
Even some of the grains do quite well at pulling up minerals and giving back those nutrients they took in when used for chop and drop style cover cropping.

Just about any of the cold hardy species of fruit bearing trees should do well for you,
Most all trees benefit greatly from having good mycorrhizae in and around their roots and it is easy to make those additions at the time of planting.
If you build your soil, the plants will do well as long as they can survive the lowest temperatures the area receives.

Redhawk
 
pollinator
Posts: 2144
Location: 4b
516
dog forest garden trees bee building
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Eivind Djonne wrote:Hi.

Im designing an area and using the NAP system so far. The system as far as I can tell says Nitrogen fixer, Apple, Pear/Plum.
My question is where would nut trees fit into this? What about peaches, paw paws, kiwis etc? I guess peaches and paw paws both begin with the letter P.

Anything else you can teach me about the system? Can I interchange or replace other trees with the A or P letter?
Ive watched the movie beyond organic.



I think the major point from the idea of NAP is to make sure that like trees are not near one another. The idea is to keep apple trees away from apple trees, pears away from pears, etc., so that pests and disease can't easily move from one tree to the next. I use a kind of variation of it, while incorporating more guild plants as Bryant suggested.

To incorporate other trees not specifically mentioned, just put them into the rotation anywhere you like, just not next to each other. It could just as easily be a nitrogen fixer, walnut, paw paw, N fixer, peach, apple, N fixer,  almond, plum,...
 
Eivind Djonne
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Trace Oswald wrote:

Eivind Djonne wrote:Hi.

Im designing an area and using the NAP system so far. The system as far as I can tell says Nitrogen fixer, Apple, Pear/Plum.
My question is where would nut trees fit into this? What about peaches, paw paws, kiwis etc? I guess peaches and paw paws both begin with the letter P.

Anything else you can teach me about the system? Can I interchange or replace other trees with the A or P letter?
Ive watched the movie beyond organic.



I think the major point from the idea of NAP is to make sure that like trees are not near one another. The idea is to keep apple trees away from apple trees, pears away from pears, etc., so that pests and disease can't easily move from one tree to the next. I use a kind of variation of it, while incorporating more guild plants as Bryant suggested.

To incorporate other trees not specifically mentioned, just put them into the rotation anywhere you like, just not next to each other. It could just as easily be a nitrogen fixer, walnut, paw paw, N fixer, peach, apple, N fixer,  almond, plum,...



Thanks. That was the answer I was looking for.
gift
 
100th Issue of Permaculture Magazine
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic