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Replacing cedar in the forest

 
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The forested area on our land has quite a few small (<12') cedar trees growing up. We are not interested in cedar for the timber value, and we both have a degree of allergic reaction to it. We're going to wipe them all out. It can survive plenty of other palces.

The fact that it's growing in multiple areas (including very near mature trees) indicates that there is some sort of ecological niche or favorable conditions for it. What should we introduce to replace it that could also take advantage of those conditions?

The mature trees around it are bois d'arc, oak, and some others that we have not identified yet (deciduous, not many leaves left).

Something with a use as food for people or animals would be great.

Zone 7, north Texas (100+ summers, rarely below 20*F in winter)
 
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Does Stone Pine (Pinus pinea) grows where you are? It's a great tree!!!
 
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Jonathan McCoy wrote:T

The fact that it's growing in multiple areas (including very near mature trees) indicates that there is some sort of ecological niche or favorable conditions for it. What should we introduce to replace it that could also take advantage of those conditions?



In Texas, cedar (juniper) is limited by fire; in ye olde days it tended to only be found in protected canyons where fire couldn't reach it. So finding it somewhere typically indicates it hasn't been controlled by fire or in modern days, by other means, and as far as I know, no other special conditions. Bois d'arc generally likes to grow in somewhat more moist location, at least in my area it's found along creeks. You might consider planting some kinds of nuts, such as walnuts or pecans.

 
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That's a tough one. We have lots of western red cedar and it is extremely shade tolerant and alliopathic to boot. I remove all the cedars to create an opening in the canopy and then plant my desired trees ,ie chestnuts, in the center.
 
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