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How do shallow-rooted plants without tap roots manage to be dynamic accumulators?

 
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I have a question.  How do shallow rooted plants (such as woodland strawberry and yarrow)  dynamic accumulators?  I thought that in order to accumulate nutrients, you had to have a taproot.  
 
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Location: Western WA
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I don't think they all have to have taproots, although many do. Others may depend on an extensive root system that can accumulate more nutrients than others.  The root system of the woodland strawberry forms a symbiotic relationship with endomycorrhizal bacteria, and that may have something to do with it, too.  I'm not educated enough about it to know for certain.

Sue
 
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Location: North Central Michigan
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i don't know the answer either, however I have read over and over that yarrow is a great soil buildler, and I'm not exactly sure why, but I have read it.
 
Posts: 298
Location: Orcas Island, WA
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I think that deep rooting is a common feature of most dynamic accumulators, however this isn't always the case. Commonly, the plants are drawing minerals from the subsoil and concentrating them in their bodies. It is possible that plants are drawing in the nutrients they concentrate from the surface as well.

If anyone wants see a grand list of dynamic accumulators and what they accumulate, check out http://oregonbd.org/Class/accum.htm.

Dave
 
Brenda Groth
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Location: North Central Michigan
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the wild strawberries naturalize all over  my property..and we LOVE them..I have grown purchased strawberry plants and they dont do as well as the wild ones..ron loves to bring me a handful of wild strawberries..when he goes out weeding..they basically make a natural ground cover in my rear..mostly the prefer to pop up in some shade..here..i allow them to grow whereever they pop up
 
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Location: Arnold ca. Soon to be skagit county wa
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The hairs on the roots take nutrients from the fungi. The fungi get nutrients from breaking down rocks and dead plant material

http://www.hobbyfarms.com/how-do-roots-pull-nutrition-out-of-the-soil-3/
 
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