Win a copy of The Prairie Homestead Cookbook this week in the Cooking Forum forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • James Freyr
  • Mike Haasl
  • paul wheaton
  • Dave Burton
stewards:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Steve Thorn
  • Eric Hanson

Growing veneer quality trees for long term carbon sequestration

 
Posts: 119
Location: Eastern Ontario
27
cattle trees tiny house composting toilet wood heat greening the desert
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have a long commute (in an electric car! ) and it gives me time to ponder.  Bear with me.

Lets face it we are all on our land for short period of time.  How can we increase the likely hood of the next owner of our land, and the one after them and the next will continue our good works of carbon farming?  If we dont then what is the point if some jerk just undoes what we worked towards.

Somewhat unrealtedly I was thinking that while I am new at 'chop and drop' for carbon farming that it was awefully similar to a process I call 'blanching' where you carefully trim lower branches off of young trees of high value species, at the collar of the branch and the trunk.  This promotes quick vertical growth in the tree and knot free wood. Ive done this and it amazing how quickly a black walnut tree will shoot up as it 'thinks' that something is eating its lower branches and needs to get above it. A 16 foot black walnut log that is knot free and veneer quality is incredibly valuable. Ive heard of large logs selling for $10,000 or more.  I ve always been too lazy to clean up the branches and have just left them where they drop. So no different than chop and drop, just done with care.

Then it hit me. What we need to do is incentivize future owners of our land so they carbon farm out of self interest by growing the highest quality trees as possible and hopefully future owners will recognize what they have.  Future owners of my property will find a stand of tall and straight walnut trees 16 feet to first branch, and a maple bush with carefully selected quality trees,  and hedge rows with prunned  black cherry trees.  None will be veneer quality when I leave this mortal coil but maybe just maybe they will leave these trees for another 40 years and maybe their successors will do the same. I can only hope but if I dont prune for quality these tree are destined for nothing more than firewood.

Once the tree is peeled into a 16th of an inch veneer it is glued to 11 other sheets of lesser woods and so the carbon you sequester in multiplied 12 times and since its probably used in fine furniture it should be locked out of the carbon cycle for many years.

 
gardener
Posts: 2417
Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
349
cat pig rocket stoves
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Jeff;
Great long term plans for your property!
One way to feel good about future of your property, is to have a large family.  With luck it will stay in your family for many generations.
That way, your children at least know what your long term plans were … and why. Hopefully they will explain it all to their children.
Will your grandchildren who inherit the family farm want the same things as you did ?  Ha your guess is as good as mine! You can only hope...

Meanwhile, carry on forward. Its the only way to go anyway, no matter what the future might hold after your gone.
 
master pollinator
Posts: 11528
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
800
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm planting seeds of Bur Oak, Bois d'Arc (Osage Orange), Pecan (a Hickory), and Linden.  All valuable for furniture and carving.
 
Jeff Marchand
Posts: 119
Location: Eastern Ontario
27
cattle trees tiny house composting toilet wood heat greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thomas: I got just the two kids, I think thats all there will be. Id rather be working in my garden and moving my cows than spend time trying to convince sweet young things to have babies with this old fool!
Both are destined for big city jobs as I was when I was a young fool.

Tyler: Good for you. I  planed a bunch of burr oaks this spring too. Im too far north for Osage Orange and Pecan.  Maybe my grand children will be able to grow them here the way things are going!  I envy you home grown pecan pies.  Ive planted shagbark hickory which are edible.  I have loads of bitternut hickories in my woodlot but no one wants a bitternut hickory pie!
 
The permaculture playing cards make great stocking stuffers: http://richsoil.com/cards
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!