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Movie- Biggest Little Farm

 
pollinator
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This documentary looks good it s/b good if/when it becomes available locally. 8+ years from idea to "might work" in the life of a couple on 200 acres in southern CA. The hubby happened to be a pro cinematographer.

Presently showing for a couple weeks in the SF Bay Area at the moment; probably other large venues also.


Rufus
 
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From what little I can tell right now, it does seem like the movie might be pretty good.



From The Biggest Little Farm Movie:

The Biggest Little Farm Movie wrote:THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM chronicles the eight-year quest of John and Molly Chester as they trade city living for 200 acres of barren farmland and a dream to harvest in harmony with nature... Featuring breathtaking cinematography, captivating animals, and an urgent message to heed Mother Nature’s call, THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM provides us all a vital blueprint for better living and a healthier planet.  

 
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Anybody seen this movie? What did you think? Should I show it to my family?
 
gardener
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there is another thread on this movie, because I remember there were different opinions. I saw it when traveling in the US a few months ago. It was family safe. I thought it was beautifully made, if a touch unrealistic about what running a farm is really like if you dont have millions of dollars in venture capital paying your bills.
 
pollinator
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Tereza Okava wrote:there is another thread on this movie, because I remember there were different opinions. I saw it when traveling in the US a few months ago. It was family safe. I thought it was beautifully made, if a touch unrealistic about what running a farm is really like if you dont have millions of dollars in venture capital paying your bills.




I think it would be a good movie to watch, if nothing else it shows the hardships every farmer faces. I liked the movie series "Pioneer Quest" on PBS for that reason as well, it showed what life was really like back then.
 
pollinator
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Beautiful photography!  John Chester was a documentary filmmaker before he went to farming.  It's obvious he called in all his best cameras to do this film.  He's also got one children's picture book out (and more planned, I'll bet).  Saving Emma the Pig is the title.



A quote:
"After seven years, you're not farming alone."  
Their practices encourage a wider variety of animal life that help to balance crop predation.  For example, hawks move in and help control the birds that eat the fruit.  
 
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We rented it from Amazon Prime last week. It is very well done, with great cinematography. As mentioned by others, it seems that they had quite substantial financial support, professional and labor support, for what they did. The strong theme is the interconnectedness of nature, which was nicely developed, but I got the feeling that they were selectively grouping their experiences to make it fit the theme. From my homesteading perspective, there were many details that were probably not shown or mentioned to keep the theme clear. All in all, very impressive. Worth watching.
 
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I watched it a few months ago at a movie festival, and I recommend it to everyone. I love the idea of involving animals to encourage natural processes within the farm.
 
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