• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Nicole Alderman
stewards:
  • Mike Haasl
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • John F Dean
  • Rob Lineberger
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • Ash Jackson
  • Jordan Holland

Growing grapes

 
gardener
Posts: 950
Location: Galicia, Spain zone 9a
239
dog duck chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts pig bike bee solar ungarbage
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We live in a booming wine growing area, but we want grapes to eat. Many local people grow grapes and make their own wine, but excellent wines are so cheap here we dont want to go down that road. This video is an instructional toolto get started growjng grapes. I have the perfect soil and am going to plant against a south facing 8 ft wall then train them over and across our courtyard to the house to give the courtyard summer shade. Well, that's the plan...
 
Posts: 75
Location: Sweden
10
cattle transportation woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think that the price of wine would be the last reason to make own wine.I would grow grapes and make wine because of the huge amount of herbicides and pesticides using in the wine yard.The fraud with blending quality wine with less good is another reason.It is not always the label telling the truth.
 
Posts: 9002
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
670
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I also used to live in a wine area and there's a bit of it here. Those concerned with making alcohol couldn't seem to understand that I just wanted grapes to eat. The ones for wine were so sweet that that sweetness covered up everything else.

Grapes for wine are incredibly cheap, so someone doing it at home by hand can't begin to compete if you were ever to want to sell some. When I look at organically grown grapes at the grocery store, they tend to go for about $4 a pound. I've only grown a few grapes but enough to know that I could do very well selling them at $4 a pound.
 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
gardener
Posts: 950
Location: Galicia, Spain zone 9a
239
dog duck chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts pig bike bee solar ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Dale Hodgins wrote:I also used to live in a wine area and there's a bit of it here. Those concerned with making alcohol couldn't seem to understand that I just wanted grapes to eat. The ones for wine were so sweet that that sweetness covered up everything else.

Grapes for wine are incredibly cheap, so someone doing it at home by hand can't begin to compete if you were ever to want to sell some. When I look at organically grown grapes at the grocery store, they tend to go for about $4 a pound. I've only grown a few grapes but enough to know that I could do very well selling them at $4 a pound.



Ditto! Everybody sells grapes for wine here but also make their own then distill some to make aguadiente which ghey flavourwith herbs. Many people keep bees and equipment forbee keeping, wine making and growing is available everywhere. . Everybody is subsistence farming. It gives a bit of cash in August. Then they walk around their hamlets collecting chestnuts and sell them for a pittance to chestnut processing plants. Same with apples and potatoes. Everybody grows their own vegetables, keep livestock of every type for meat, maybe raising an extra cow for sale. In the winter they kill a pig and the extended family arrives to drink the young wine and make chorizo (1 per person per week plus 1 extra per week for guests) which they smoke. They are all incredibly healthy and happy and live for a  extraordinary length of time.
20190524_160421.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20190524_160421.jpg]
 
pioneer
Posts: 214
Location: California Coastal range
57
homeschooling goat kids food preservation fiber arts building solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If your area is already a grape growing area your should have good luck.  My land was part of a vineyard pre-prohibition.  There are feral vines that grow out from old rootstock.  So I planted a couple table grapes to shade the deck on the south side if the house and they do very well.  No work or fuss.  Grapes every year.  Great shade to cool the house in the summer,  and they lose leaves to let light thru for noticeable winter heat gain.
 
Posts: 61
Location: Europe - CZ, Pannonian / continental zone
12
kids purity chicken composting toilet homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you decide to plant your own grapes and want to grow them organically, you should chose some interspecific hybrids, hardy against mildew.. Are such varieties accesible in your country?
 
pollinator
Posts: 706
Location: NW California, 1500-1800ft,
138
hugelkultur dog duck
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am lucky to have a 2nd generation organic Willamette Valley vintner as one of my best friends since childhood. They have 13 varietals of grapes, 9 for wine and 4 table. I like pretty much all of them fresh while picking, and I eat them like a bear, but two that stand out are Muscat (taste a lot like fruit loops) and Mars (like grape soda). Maybe this reveals my childish taste, though I do love Pinot Noir and Mueller fresh too. Maybe I've just been lucky, but I would be surprised if someone who I helped pick hundreds or thousands of pounds for didn't welcome taking home as much as I could eat fresh (they only last a week or so).
 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
gardener
Posts: 950
Location: Galicia, Spain zone 9a
239
dog duck chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts pig bike bee solar ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you Jan and Ben. Grape vines are always for sale at our weekly markets along with everything one needs to grow and harvest.Vendimias are held every autumn as the grapes ripen, people come to their ancestral homes from all over the country for the grape picking and huge family meals are prepared. Very hard work, aspecially in the Ribeira Sacra, on the slopes down to the MiƱo and Sil rivers.
gift
 
Companion Planting Guide by World Permaculture Association
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic