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Is this edible? - primula, common primrose

 
Posts: 35
Location: Turin, Italy
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A volunteer in my garden, can we eat it? If so how?
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pollinator
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Location: Denmark 57N
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It's a primula, looking at the single seed head I can see on the first picture it may well be a common primrose.  IF so then it is edible, but I would not eat it until you have seen the flowers and made certain of the identification.
 
Meyer Raymond
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Location: Turin, Italy
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We have lots of primula in our garden so that makes sense, but they flowered a while ago, they are the first signs of spring here, hence the name 😜. Being that they flowered in late february, should we have eaten them then?
I knew primula are edible, but wouldn't know how to prepare them, are they good? What do you do with them?
 
Skandi Rogers
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I've only ever eaten the flowers dipped in egg white and then in sugar and allowed to dry. google says that the leaves vary a lot in taste but I have no experience there.
 
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cook the leaves like greens, flowers can also be used as a tea.
 
Meyer Raymond
Posts: 35
Location: Turin, Italy
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I did a quick search for recipes, in Italy there are tons. Most of them use both flowers and leaves, so i wonder if they will be different because they are more mature. I'm going to try this weekend.

Some of the recipes i found were frittata, risotto, soup, salad (i imagine only with younger leaves) and pasta.

I will probably tried sautéed in olive oil to get a sense of the flavor before trying in some other dish. Thanks for the suggestions!
 
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