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What's your favorite shade loving edible?

 
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Location: Northwest Missouri
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There's a large hackberry tree on the north side of my infant food forest. Looks like somebody tried to grow grapes on the north side of that tree and failed, presumably because it got way too shady for grapes as the tree grew. What would you grow there? I'm considering climbers to take advantage of the T-post trellis already there, but I'm open to any shade loving suggestions!  Zone 5 here with neutral soil.
 
gardener & author
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I am a big fan of ginger and turmeric, but you are too cold for those. Under my hackberries in Tennessee I had a profusion of wild violets which were very nice for eating and making tea. Wild garlic also grew there, and I also planted Jerusalem artichokes at the edge of the canopy. They didn't grow as big in half shade but they still bore roots.
 
pollinator
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I've grown Swiss chard in the shade of other garden vegetables. When is a good canopy of Swiss chard, it works to prevent unwanted ground covers.
 
steward
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My favorite shade loving edible is oyster mushrooms. Oh and chickens. They love foraging in well protected shady places.
 
pollinator
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Joseph Lofthouse wrote:My favorite shade loving edible is oyster mushrooms. Oh and chickens. They love foraging in well protected shady places.



I was going to say beef. They love the shade on a scorcher.

-CK
 
Chris Kott
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Ooh! It's also my favourite shade-loving vegan edible (edible vegan?).

And mushrooms are a favourite, too. My much-better-half jokes that onion, garlic, and mushroom frying in butter on a cast-iron pan is Polish Aromatherapy (I am descended from Polish immigrants on both sides).

-CK
 
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Pawpaw trees and huckleberries, all my mushrooms, most of the herb gardens, are items we grow that love the shade.

Hogs and Chickens are the animals we raise that love the shade.

I just have to share this bumper sticker I saw yesterday since it was in the shade of the car it was on. "Save the vegetables, eat a vegan" I thought it was quite hilarious, since it was on a Volvo, a vehicle that is loved by most of the vegans I know.
 
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Is the tree full sized and wide?  I'm wondering if the site still gets morning or evening sun?  Some part shade plants could be an option then.  Gooseberries, currants, hazelnuts, etc
 
pollinator
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Ramsons- mine grow under a privet hedge that I very rarely trim.

Japanese wineberries- produce very well with minimal sun, though they do need light. And they're beautiful and delicious.

But in my most shady place I raise chickens!
 
pollinator
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Miner's lettuce, so called because it grows in areas dark like mines. Crispy, fleshy refreshing leaves with a slight bitter note (don't think watercress). It'll self seed and clump all over the place. Only check that it can handle your winters.

Pawpaws! They grow up in part shade, after which they do better in full sun...but I've heard word that they can fruit in part shade too. Perhaps just not as well.

Nettles: I've seen them do just fine in wet shady areas. And yes, oyster mushrooms, which I often find just beside the nettles.

Wintergreen, with its delightful (if somewhat dry) berries is a pretty and curious novelty-edible groundcover.

 
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Black currant does ok in partial shade
 
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silverbeet, 'fordhook giant'. it makes enormous leaves for catching light.

next im going to try everything i can think of that has big leaves, like rhubarb and collards.
 
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