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Raw milk sold for animals

 
Posts: 83
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana
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I dont have a source for raw milk but I’ve always wanted to try it. I found some raw goat milk at a pet store and was wondering if anyone here has tried it for human consumption.
Its not just milk. They had 2 brands, both had added ingrediants. The other one had added honey.
She said this one sold much more than the other brand.
03249848-1461-41CD-A660-D48803C5FE7D.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 03249848-1461-41CD-A660-D48803C5FE7D.jpeg]
 
steward
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I have only had raw milk that I bought by driving to a farm and buying it from the site, so I have no idea about the quality of shipped to stores raw milk.

I think it is probably safe for human consumption, because I think it is just so that raw milk is easier to access for people by labeling it as for pets. I think a good way of seeing if it is good is like what people can do for testing any new foods- taste just a little bit, wait a few hours, see how you feel, and then try a little more and wait a little longer.
 
steward
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I'd like to echo what Dave said. I also get my raw milk directly from a local farm. The milk (cow's milk, from one of three Jersey's) is from that mornings milking, on my pickup day. Each jar has a label on it that says "pet food only. Not for human consumption". Anything for human consumption requires a laundry list of hurdles, regulations and inspections, especially raw dairy, which can be illegal in some states. The milk I buy is gone within seven days and I'm getting a fresh jar again. I choose to drink raw milk, and for six years now it's never made me or my wife ill.

The whole labelling thing is a way to skirt the law and have raw milk available for those who want it and choose to drink it. It's akin to the whole foie gras thing in California that made headlines a number if years ago. Lawmakers passed a law stating it was illegal for restaurants to sell fois gras. The restaurants then offered "free" foie gras with the purchase of the entree, thus dodging the law with clever interpretation of how the law was written.

I think it's entirely up to each individual to decide if they want to try raw dairy.
 
James Freyr
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I want to add one more thought, and that's the expiration date sticker on that container of goat milk in the picture above. For me, in my opinion, I don't entirely trust expiration dates set for some given day in the future, based on what someone else deems "safe". I prefer a packaging date, so I know how long its been in there, and then decide for myself if something is getting too old or is past what I consider to be safe.
 
Julie Bernhardt
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What do you think about the added ingrediants?
The dried bacteria is what concerns me the most.
 
pollinator
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Guaranteed you've got lactobacillus acidophilus in you right now.
 
James Freyr
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Julie Bernhardt wrote:What do you think about the added ingrediants?
The dried bacteria is what concerns me the most.



Those are probiotics. Timothy is right, the lactobacillus is a common gut bacteria we all have, and so is the enterococcus, but I've not familiar with that one so I did a little googling about it. Here's a paragraph about Enterococcus faecium from https://pentec-consulting.eu/enterococcus-faecium-is-it-safe-views-from-taiwan-usa-and-eu/

E. faecium has long been recognised for its probiotic benefits and is widely used around the world. One of the major benefits of E. faecium is that it is uniquely suited to survive the digestive process and flourish in the gut. It promotes a balanced gut environment by competing for resources that harmful organisms would otherwise consume and use to grow. It also competes with harmful organisms for adhesion sites – areas on the surface of cells to which other cells and molecules can bind. Hence, this ‘multitasking’ strain is commonly found in human probiotic supplements.







 
Dave Burton
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I think it's probably safe, but if in doubt, it can always be composted or fed to another animal.

If you do try it, please may you tell us what you think of it!
 
Julie Bernhardt
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I tried it.
It just tasted like cows milk.
But that’s the only other kind of milk I’ve ever had. No negative reaction. I doubt that I will buy it again because it cost $12 for a quart. I have ferments going that are much cheaper.
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