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Anyone growing Carpathian Walnut?

 
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Hello everyone,
Around me Carpathian walnut seedlings are very common and very cheap. They're a type of Persian (English) walnut that originates in the mountains of eastern Europe. I was wondering, does anyone have experience growing or eating this nut? There are a few young ones around but I've never seen or heard of a mature one, or met someone who has eaten them. I know they're late blooming generally, which is an advantage. As seedlings I'm sure the genetics vary, but does anyone have any experience with them?
 
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Location: Romania
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The walnut ( carpathian) it is the most valuable orchard tree in the world.The nuts taste great,they are fat but the fat its healthyer than that of pecans or the black walnut.
Here its illegal to fell a walnut without permission even if its on your property.
It makes lots of high quality nuts that last a long time.
It also poisons the land under it so you cant grow tomatoes and manny otther plants directly under a walnut .
Im amazed that you say you never ate one and are asking about the taste.Its like asking how do apples taste.
Where are you from?

EDIT: I see your from Washington wich its a perfect place to grow walnuts.

This are the biggest walnuts from really rare carpathian based tree wich ive planted them.Normally they are half the size but the kernell is still bigger than pecans and the taste is similar to pecans just more concentrated.
I also have 9 big walnuts on my land.
The demand its soo high for these nuts ( the regular ones not the giant ones) that dealers and people here come to every house to ask if they dont want to trade or sell walnuts.
rare-large-carpathian-walnuts.jpg
rare large carpathian walnuts
rare large carpathian walnuts
IMG_20180113_122911.jpg
large versus small carpathian walnuts
large versus small carpathian walnuts
20190530_131004.jpg
carpathian walnut seedling
carpathian walnut seedling
 
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Location: British Columbia
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I'm thinking about purchasing some of these trees, but I'm on the edge of having warm enough weather.

I'm also worried about where to plant them, I'm wondering if they'll be an issue if planted next to other fruit trees or if chickens have access to fallen fruit.
 
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Edible Acres is a permaculture nursery located in zone 5 New York,  and they grow Carpathian Walnuts.
 
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Hi,

if you want to plant plants, then go for a grafted cultivar so you can expect something within a couple of years.
Also there are really fancy cultivars, but they can easily cost 100$.

I would not buy seedlings for the simple reason that a tree gets a different hold to the ground when it germinates in it.
This may not be crucial for an apple tree, but walnuts easily get more than a houndred years old and will become the largest
tree in your orchard(plant it in the north), so that one year you save by taking a germinated seedling
does not justify the drawback the adult tree may have, at least in my opinion.

There is a reason why the seedlings are so cheap

EDIT: It takes 10-20 years for the seedling to fruit, and significant yield can be expected in the fourth decade of its life onwards.
 
James Landreth
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Ashley Cottonwood wrote:I'm thinking about purchasing some of these trees, but I'm on the edge of having warm enough weather.

I'm also worried about where to plant them, I'm wondering if they'll be an issue if planted next to other fruit trees or if chickens have access to fallen fruit.




According to some literature I read once put out by Canadian agricultural authorities,  English type walnuts do not documentedly produce enough juglone to affect other plants. If you're worried I'd rake up and burn the leaves. I think bc would have enough heat for them.


I've eaten English walnuts,  just not  (to my knowledge) carpathian English walnuts.


Thank you for your input and information everyone!
gift
 
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