Win a copy of The Edible Ecosystem Solution this week in the Forest Garden forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Mike Haasl
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • James Freyr
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • jordan barton
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • Greg Martin
  • Leigh Tate

Dwarf Buckthorn

 
Posts: 224
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Has anyone cultivated, or have info. on 'Dwarf Dorana' Sea Buckthorn?  Supposedly it functions like the normal sea berry but only grows 4-8 feet tall
 
Posts: 769
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
sounds like a great idea. I've often wondered about sea buckthorn, as the descriptions I've read have always called it a shrub. But they've always seemed so tree-size whenever I encounter them. So it's actually kind of funny for me, someone trying to make it more shrub size.
 
Steve Nicolini
Posts: 224
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think it would make a great guild plant to use with apple trees.  It wouldn't compete for light with them.  Real hardy, I could plant it near the driveway.  Nitrogen fixer too.  Shelters wildlife.  Edible fruit

I wonder if there is any utilitarian use for sea berry?  Anyone got info? 
 
Posts: 1093
Location: Western WA
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
For additional uses, see the article from the Plants for a Future database:  http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Hippophae+rhamnoides

Sue
 
Posts: 556
Location: Western WA,usda zone 6/7,80inches of rain,250feet elevation
6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
according to agroforestry journals from europe,there is enough variation in sea berry that some have proposed it be divided into up to 8 different species.There is some extreme variation in sizes out there.The hardiest types tend to be shorter.Either way,shrubs like sea berry are easy to keep small by heavy pruning.In fact,I always plant my shrubs in very close spacing.This allows me to have more varieties in less space.More time is spent prunning however.
 
Posts: 76
Location: Seboeis Plantation, ME
5
forest garden
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
http://seaberry-hippophaerhamnoides.blogspot.com/
My Seaberry / Sea Buckthorn Blog has a bunch of information about this plant and chronicles my experiment as it progresses.  While I do not have the variety you mention, yet,  I do have Frugana, Orange Energy, Titan, Orange Delight, one surviving Male, Golden Sweet, Leikora, and Sunny Seabuckthorn.  I hope it is interesting and I especially like to receive advice from others!
 
My cellmate was this tiny ad:
Rocket Mass Heater Manual - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/8/rmhman
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic