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Pollination question. Is there such a thing as too many flowers?

 
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Forgive me if this is a stupid question but I am but a humble noob. I finally got a house and I have a giant yard. I’m not growing tons my first year so I’ll be left with about half an acre of grass to mow. I was thinking about throwing around a bunch of wildflower and clover seed to cover a large part of the unused yard so I won’t have to mow so much and so the birds and bees will have plenty of food (also that nitrogen fixing goodness). My question is this: if I plant a metric crap-ton of flowers is it possible there will be more than the pollinators can pollinate? Like is it possible the bees will be too caught up in the mass of wildflowers to pollinate my veggies? Again, sorry if it’s a dumb question.
 
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In my experience, the number of pollinators rises to the number of plants available, so I would say no, there is no such thing as too many flowers.
 
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Should be no problem. If you monitor flowering plants you might find a single bee checking things out and returning to its hive, shortly afterwards there will be as much bees coming as are needed to collect the pollen.
 
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I concur with Trace and Mike, no worries mate, a healthy hive can have a million workers, and bees will come to any field as long as there is pollen and nectar to be had.
Case in point, when I lived in New York I knew where a natural hive was and where a flower field (around 100 acres) was, when the flowers started blooming in that field the bees were there and it took them a week to get through all those flowers.
When they finished that field they moved to a commercial orchard that was only 400 yards from the edge of the flower field, but the orchard didn't start blooming until the bees were just finishing up with the flowers so the bees moved from the flowers to the apples without a hitch.

Redhawk
 
Octavia Greason
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Thanks for the reassurance guys! I shall plant all sorts of flowers without worry then and hopefully my local bees, bugs, and birds will be well fed for it.
 
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I think that it's a great idea and that you'll be grateful that you did it in the future. It will help stabilize and raise the number of pollinators in the insect for future growing seasons. If you can try to plant so that there will be something or another blooming throughout the season.

Depending on your site and such, you could consider planting trees for pollinators like littleleaf linden, which should be hardy to your area.
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