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Manicured lawn to bog garden paradise - your advice please

 
Posts: 2
Location: Glasgow, UK
homeschooling forest garden bike
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Hello,

We have just moved into a lovely place and want to create as biodiverse a garden space as possible. The back of the garden is currently waterlogged which is not unusual for Scotland. The previous owners used an electric pump to remove the water :( but the problem is the solution right? So I am looking for your advice/suggestions on what to do with this wet area that ranges from 0-200mm of pooled rain water.

Bog Garden? Reed bed? Wet meadow?

I'd be really interested to hear about your experiences.

Thanks,

Gina

 
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Location: Denmark 57N
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Going to be very boring and say wait. you need to know if it dries in summer, some of my land dries out enough to be walk-able in summer and some is even dig-able and plant-able, but other bits never dry out and are constantly either covered or saturated. I do have reedbeds and to be honest they are boring and invasive, we have shallow ponds, a couple of springs, one of which grows watercress, and the rest is wet meadow. so rushes, meadowsweet, bog avens, some umbelifers the bottom is wet enough that grass is not really happy and we only have a couple of wet tolerant species. also willow, alder and rowen trees manage. None of our trees in the wet areas get big, as the top soil is shallow and is underlain by solid clay which no roots can penetrate (and is also the reason why it is wet) So strong winds bring them down regularly.
We do actually have a bog garden.. in one of the dryer areas, most plants sold for bog gardens only like to be moist not soaked, and especially not soaked over winter and then frozen solid.
 
Gina Lundy-Clark
Posts: 2
Location: Glasgow, UK
homeschooling forest garden bike
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Thank you for the swift response, really helpful. I think what you say about waiting makes sense. I guess there's always a tendency to rush in and make changes, being more watchful will give us a better idea of how to approach it. In the meantime I have a lot of water on the lawn, how to best use it? 👌
 
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