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Nicholas Molberg
Post     Subject: Cup of tea - PEP BB foraging.sand.tea

After having read the list of allowed plants, despairing that I couldn't find any in the local state park, I went out looking for Spruce.

Blue Spruce in particular, is very distinct from other spruces and pines, and very distinct from Yew and other toxic trees.

Nice thing about Blue Spruce is the entire tree is edible. Bark, cambium, 'fruit', and the boughs themselves.

It was even used by the US Army back in the 1800s, as part of their rations.

https://youtu.be/RgLC_DRd2cg
Nicholas Molberg
Post     Subject: Cup of tea - PEP BB foraging.sand.tea

This is Colorado in early fall, so some of these plants aren't common on the prairie. But I found something just as nice.

Moonshine Yarrow and some common Milkweed. It looks like a Datura, and is a distant relative.




Here they are with the aromatics remove from the stalk, seeds removed from the pods, since it's mostly fluff to help the seeds spread.


The usual suspects. Distilled water and a nice, heavily used kettle.

And here they are steeping in the pot. I've got a cup in hand right now.

So, I added some sugar and a bit of apple cider vinegar. Milkweed is somewhat toxic, so I added a small amount of the seeds. Milkweed, like most datura relatives, can interfere with heart function in high doses. This takes the form of lower blood pressure, and potential arrhythmic heartbeat.

In smaller doses, it does help to calm and regulate the bowels. Supposedly.


Inge Leonora-den Ouden
Post     Subject: Cup of tea - PEP BB foraging.sand.tea

A little morning walk alongside the water, before the sun became too hot. To pick some herbs for a cup of 'morning tea'.


Stinging nettles, plenty of them


Picked some tops of nettles for my tea


Yarrow grows at the other side of the path, higher and dryer


Mint grows very close to the water (when the water is higher it even grows in the water)


All herbs gathered


Give them a short boil. Then wait for a few minutes


Pour in the tea mug through a tea strainer


A nice cup of morning tea!
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
Post     Subject: PEP BB foraging.sand.tea - cup of tea

Michael Cox wrote:On a bushcraft and foraging course I did a few years ago we made a pine needle tea (I didn't enjoy it!).

The instructors recounted the story of one participant who, after trying pine needle tea decided to make some for himself at a later date. I he misidentified the tree and made a cup of yew leaf tea. Yew is highly poisonous - active compounds in the leaves rapidly stop the hearts of mammals, and the leaves are harvested by pharmaceutical companies for making heart medication. This chap gave himself permanent heart damage and spent a week in hospital.

Make sure you positively ID anything you consume!


If you don't know the difference between pine and yew after a foraging course ... it wasn't a good course!
Rob Lineberger
Post     Subject: Cup of tea - PEP BB foraging.sand.tea

I recently learned that clover are in the pea family.  Huh.  Anyway, I made some clover-mint tea and it was delicious.  Kinda like Celestial Seasonings, but with a pulse.

Penny McLoughlin
Post     Subject: PEP BB foraging.sand.tea - cup of tea

Wild strawberry leaf tea.
Michael Cox
Post     Subject: PEP BB foraging.sand.tea - cup of tea

On a bushcraft and foraging course I did a few years ago we made a pine needle tea (I didn't enjoy it!).

The instructors recounted the story of one participant who, after trying pine needle tea decided to make some for himself at a later date. I he misidentified the tree and made a cup of yew leaf tea. Yew is highly poisonous - active compounds in the leaves rapidly stop the hearts of mammals, and the leaves are harvested by pharmaceutical companies for making heart medication. This chap gave himself permanent heart damage and spent a week in hospital.

Make sure you positively ID anything you consume!
Mike Haasl
Post     Subject: PEP BB foraging.sand.tea - cup of tea

I made some chaga tea today.  The missus does it all the time but I figured I'd document doing it myself.  Chaga grows on birch trees.  If you see something similar on a cherry it is not chaga!

I broke off a small chunk (it almost fell off), ground it up with the mortar and pestle and used a tea ball clasper thingie to steep it in.  It doesn't have much taste (to me) but it's apparently good for you.

That's a huge 16 oz mug so that's why it's only half full.
Nicole Alderman
Post     Subject: PEP BB foraging.sand.tea - cup of tea

I made a cup of dandelion tea (I would have done mint, but I have acid reflux, and mint messes with that)
Nicole Alderman
Post     Subject: PEP BB foraging.sand.tea - cup of tea

Dandelion is also good, so is bullthistle. It's a lot tastier than cooking them, and easier, too!

I'll add everyone's suggestions to the list. Paul can always take the ones off that he doesn't want there.
Jan White
Post     Subject: PEP BB foraging.sand.tea - cup of tea

Pine needle & fir tip
Ceanothus americanus/new jersey tea
Kinnikinnick
Sumac
Linden flower
Wild strawberry leaf
Fireweed
Birch bark/leaves
Clover
Sage
Rose petals

Birch is the only one I haven't had. I can affirm that none of the others are gross :)
Mike Haasl
Post     Subject: PEP BB foraging.sand.tea - cup of tea

Raspberry leaves and chaga mushrooms (grow on birch trees) are good ones from my bioregion.
paul wheaton
Post     Subject: PEP BB foraging.sand.tea - cup of tea

Mike Jay wrote:Make a cup of tea from one of:
- nettle
- rose hips
- mint
- pineapple weed



What might be added to this list?
Mike Haasl
Post     Subject: Cup of tea - PEP BB foraging.sand.tea

This is a badge bit (BB) that is part of the PEP curriculum.  Completing this BB is part of getting the sand badge in Foraging.

Foraging is like gardening but without all the planting, weeding, nibbler protection or watering.  If you live in the country there are lots of road sides to search.  These must be wild foods - not gleaning or harvesting from an actively cultivated space.

Plant identification is the most important part of foraging.  Get one or two good books on the edibles of your region.  Be sure you know what you're picking!

To complete this BB, the minimum requirements are:
Make a cup of tea from one of:
- nettle
- rose hips
- mint
- pineapple weed
- raspberry leaves
- chaga mushrooms
- pine needle
- fir tip
- Ceanothus americanus/new jersey tea
- kinnikinnick
- sumac
- Linden flower
- wild strawberry leaf
- fireweed
- birch bark/leaves
- clover
- rose petals
- dandelion
- bullthistle

To document your completion of the BB, provide the following:
 - A picture of one of the plants in the wild
 - A picture of the harvested goods with the remaining plant in the background
 - A picture of the yummy tea in a cup

Clarifications:
 - This is "Foraging" so the plants can not be cultivated by you.