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Inge Leonora-den Ouden
Post     Subject: PEP BB textile.sand.pillow - Sew a small pillow

Jennifer Richardson wrote:I sometimes like to stuff cushions with fabric scraps from sewing, rags that have disintegrated, yarn trimmings, etc. If I used cotton/wool/linen scraps, would this be an acceptable natural stuffing? Or might the requirements be expanded to include reusing/repurposing old synthetic stuffing materials? I think this is a pretty good way to sequester the stuff, which is hard to figure out what to do with.


Hi Jennifer. I thought of that too. I found an old pillow I made as a teenager (at my mother's house). Because I decided it could better be thrown away (being very dirty), I first looked what was inside. It was filled with tiny pieces of old wool blankets. Then I thought: this kind of stuffing material might be OK for the BB too.
Jennifer Richardson
Post     Subject: PEP BB textile.sand.pillow - Sew a small pillow

I sometimes like to stuff cushions with fabric scraps from sewing, rags that have disintegrated, yarn trimmings, etc. If I used cotton/wool/linen scraps, would this be an acceptable natural stuffing? Or might the requirements be expanded to include reusing/repurposing old synthetic stuffing materials? I think this is a pretty good way to sequester the stuff, which is hard to figure out what to do with.
dawn west
Post     Subject: PEP BB textile.sand.pillow - Sew a small pillow

It is still raining in the PNW so on to making a small pillow.  My son ripped out his jeans which are cotton so I am using them as my fabric. The wool is from the Black Sheep festival from 10 years ago when I thought I would learn to spin. I broke 1 machine needle and remembered why thimbles are so important to hand sewing. Starting to do some BBs in nesting and textiles reminds me that these skills are just as important as tool care and woodland care and that I am rusty.
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
Post     Subject: PEP BB textile.sand.pillow - Sew a small pillow

Nicole Alderman wrote:Inge, any chance you can measure it?

I'm thinking that if it clearly uses the same amount of stitches around, it would be really easy to certify. So, if a square pillow that's 10x10 has 40inches perimeter, a round pillow that's has the same amount of inches in circumference would be easy one to certify. I divided a circumference of 40 by pi to find out that a pillow with a diameter of 12.7 inches (32 centimeters), would have the same amount of stitches as a 10x10 pillow.

That's a lot of math! Basically, if your pillow is 32 cm across, I can easily certify it. If not, then I'll have to ask the higher-ups to weigh in.


Nicole, in that case this pillow is too small. No BB for this one.
Never mind. I will make another one. A square pillow of the right size, probaby made of an old T-shirt, like the others did. I can use such a pillow in one of my pillow covers.
Nicole Alderman
Post     Subject: PEP BB textile.sand.pillow - Sew a small pillow

Inge, any chance you can measure it?

I'm thinking that if it clearly uses the same amount of stitches around, it would be really easy to certify. So, if a square pillow that's 10x10 has 40inches perimeter, a round pillow that's has the same amount of inches in circumference would be easy one to certify. I divided a circumference of 40 by pi to find out that a pillow with a diameter of 12.7 inches (32 centimeters), would have the same amount of stitches as a 10x10 pillow.

That's a lot of math! Basically, if your pillow is 32 cm across, I can easily certify it. If not, then I'll have to ask the higher-ups to weigh in.
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
Post     Subject: PEP BB textile.sand.pillow - Sew a small pillow

I made this small pillow of reclaimed cotton duvet cover material. It isn't square, but round, I hope that counts too.

the fabric


cutting the round shape with the help of a glass plate


pinning


stitched with the sewing machine, left a part open


filling with wool


closing the opening with overhand stitches


finished!  

Dave Burton
Post     Subject: PEP BB textile.sand.pillow - Sew a small pillow

I used a t-shirt that I found on the Free Shelf at Basecamp.



This a progress picture of me working on my pillow.



This is before I turned it inside out.



This is after I turned it inside out.



This is while I stuffed the pillow.



This is after I finished the pillow.

r ranson
Post     Subject: PEP BB textile.sand.pillow - Sew a small pillow

I dug through the GoodWill pile and found this old skirt with some lovely twill fabric.

I had some wool that is too fragile to make into yarn, so I lightly carded it for the filling.  If I used the wool as it is, I would have lumpy filling which makes for a lumpy pillow.  
Nicole Alderman
Post     Subject: PEP BB textile.sand.pillow - Sew a small pillow

Finally got a chance to make my pillow! I used an old dress shirt and knit shirt (two layers in hopes that it would keep the feathers from poking out), and stuffed with wool and duck feathers that I picked up from my duck house. I tried to surround the feathers with wool so that they had a harder time poking out.
Nicole Alderman
Post     Subject: PEP BB textile.sand.pillow - Sew a small pillow

This is a badge bit (BB) that is part of the PEP curriculum.  Completing this BB is part of getting the sand badge in textiles.

In this project, you will make a small pillowcase.

To complete this Badge Bit, you must:
  -  Post a before picture of your fabric
  -  Post a picture of your pillow in progress
  -  Post a picture of you stuffing your pillow
  -  Post a picture of your completed pillow!

Requirements:
  - Must be stuffed with a natural material: bedstraw, straw, feathers or wool
  - Fabric must be either reclaimed from an old tee-shirt/sheet, or be a natural material (hemp, cotton, wool, linen, silk, etc)
  - Be at least 10x10 inches
  - It can be machine sewn, as you can probably already sew by hand if you can use a sewing machine!

Here's a quick video on sewing a pillow



If you've never sewn before, I have a more in-depth tutorial down below!

Here's a tutorial on how to sew!

Step
1

Measure and Cut the Fabric



Generally, it is useful to first WASH the fabric, as it will shrink when washed. Though, if you're never planning on washing your pillow, this isn't really necessary. And, if it's an old tee-shirt or sheet you're re-purposing, you don't need to wash it, either.

Once the fabric is washed and dried, you'll want to iron it flat (not as necessary in a little pillow, but it's a good thing to get in the process of doing when sewing most anything)

Now lay it on a flat, preferably smooth surface and measure and cut it.



If you don't have the fancy clear ruler and slicy-thingy, no worries! Use any sort of straight edge to draw the line you'll cut. Find the sharpest pair of scissors you have, and cut on the line! (You can also buy a brand new pair of scissors and devote them soley to fabric so they stay sharp. Threaten your family with dire consequences if they use your precious fabric scissors for anything that's not fabric. Hide the scissors from them, too, if need be!)



Step
2

Pin the Fabric and Thread the Needle



Pin the pieces of fabric together



Thread the Needle


Tie a knot at the end of the needle





Step
3

Sew It



You might want to use a pencil and draw a line 1/2 inch from the edge of your fabric. This is where you'll sew. Make sure to NOT sew the whole pillow. Leave a gap to turn the thing right side out, and to stuff it.

You can Either sew it with a running stitch



or the back stitch. The back stitch is a bit more secure.





Step
4

Turn the Fabric Right-Side Out and Stuff It



Reach your finger through the hole you left, and grab some fabric and pull it through the hole. Just like when you turn your pants right side out.

Shove your stuffing through the hole. Push the stuffing into the corners first, then keep putting more stuffing in. And more stuffing. And even more. Because it will compress.





Step
5

Sew the hole shut!



For this, you need a blind stitch