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get rid of mushrooms on relatively new sod

 
                                  
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Hi,

I have put down new topsoil and grass about 3 months ago on my front lawn and recently (about a week ago) I noticed mushrooms grow in certain sections. I usually get about 15-20 mushrooms growing a day. Every morning before work, I get up early and pick them up and throw them away, but they still grow every day. I read online that mushrooms aren't necessarily harmful so I have not done anything other then pick them and reduce the sprinkler times. I would like to get rid of them as they are pretty ugly though. I read that I should try to get rid of old tree stumps and roots, but this is new soil and grass, so I don't think i have any of that.

I have a landscaper who cuts grass on my lawn and he mentioned that as my lawn is new, that is part of the problem and when he puts down fertilizer in a few weeks, that should help or even get rid of the problem. I am the only house on the block that has this problem, but I am also the only guy that has new soil/ grass.

I would like to know if there is anything I can do to get rid of them and whether or not my landscaper is right. I am a new homeowner and I have never heard of people having mushrooms on their lawn. Is it a common problem? I hate getting up early for work too, wish there was something I could do.

Just another note I have a young boy who is rapidly puts stuff in his mouth. I want to make sure that he doesnt stick a mushroom in while playing outside.

Thanks for your responses in advance

 
                            
Posts: 43
Location: Pennsylvania, Zone 5B
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It's pretty common, but most here wouldn't consider it a problem. It's a sign that your soil is healthy and full of life. Also they are probably growing in the more moist sections of your lawn. You could try mowing higher, meaning you don't have to irrigate as much, meaning fewer mushrooms.

There are very few mushrooms in the US that are highly dangerous: http://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/outdoor-recreation/how/mushrooms/poisonous-mushrooms
Don't go eating them on purpose though.

If you want a mushroom identified, you might be able to find a nearby university that can tell you if a mushroom is dangerous or not.
 
Jan Sebastian Dunkelheit
Posts: 201
Location: Germany/Cologne - Finland/Savonlinna
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krakshot wrote:
I have a landscaper who cuts grass on my lawn and he mentioned that as my lawn is new, that is part of the problem and when he puts down fertilizer in a few weeks, that should help or even get rid of the problem.


Now your soil is alive when your landscaper fertilized your soil is dead. You'll see it when you don't have mushrooms popping up anymore...


No, seriously. Mushrooms are an indicator for woody debris in your soil. It's perfect soil for trees to plant in.
 
Brice Moss
Posts: 700
Location: rainier OR
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I agree, mushrooms are a sign you have great things happening in your soil, they will fade off after they eat up the excess organic matter leaving great fertile soil behind a couple pics and a spore print and folks here might be able to tell you if you should eat them
 
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