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Another Plant ID...

txpc McCoy


Joined: Mar 10, 2011
Posts: 22
See this growing in dense groups under shaded areas with good soil. It has thin 1cm long hairs growing on its round stem.



Isaac Hill
volunteer

Joined: Feb 28, 2011
Posts: 343
Location: Beaver County, Pennsylvania (~ zone 6)
    
    2
Well, it's obv something in the daisy family(Asteraceae), maybe the sunflower genus (Helianthus) -- how tall is it? What do it's roots look like?


"To oppose something is to maintain it" -- Ursula LeGuin
Michael Radelut


Joined: Jan 21, 2011
Posts: 193
Location: Germany, 7b-ish
Salamander wrote:
Well, it's obv something in the daisy family(Asteraceae), maybe the sunflower genus (Helianthus) -- how tall is it? What do it's roots look like?


Edit: I stand corrected: Should be a Jerusalem artichoke.
Thelma McGowan


Joined: Jul 03, 2011
Posts: 170
Location: western Washington, Snohomish county--zone 8b
    
    2
I have never seen a gerbera with leaves on it stem....the ones in this part of the world are not native though...they grow from a cluter of leaves and have a clean straight stem with no leaves......Is this plant a jerusalem artichoke? is is really tall and have multiple blooms on a stem?


There are no experts, Just people with more experience.
Isaac Hill
volunteer

Joined: Feb 28, 2011
Posts: 343
Location: Beaver County, Pennsylvania (~ zone 6)
    
    2
Yeah I was thinking Jerusalem Artichoke too lol
Isaac Hill
volunteer

Joined: Feb 28, 2011
Posts: 343
Location: Beaver County, Pennsylvania (~ zone 6)
    
    2
You know, it could be an Arnica...
ronie dee


Joined: Mar 04, 2009
Posts: 584
Location: Cosby MO
    
    1
Looks a lot like Calendula: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Calendula_January_2008-1_filtered.jpg


Sometimes the answer is not to cross an old bridge, nor to burn it, but to build a better bridge.
txpc McCoy


Joined: Mar 10, 2011
Posts: 22
Thanks guys for the help, I've figured it out. Its an invasive species called Creeping Oxeye from South America. Its in the sunflower family.
Thelma McGowan


Joined: Jul 03, 2011
Posts: 170
Location: western Washington, Snohomish county--zone 8b
    
    2
is it edible??
Michael Radelut


Joined: Jan 21, 2011
Posts: 193
Location: Germany, 7b-ish
auntythelma wrote:
is it edible??


It seems to have medicinal uses.
ronie dee


Joined: Mar 04, 2009
Posts: 584
Location: Cosby MO
    
    1
txpc wrote:
Thanks guys for the help, I've figured it out. Its an invasive species called Creeping Oxeye from South America. Its in the sunflower family.


Can you link to the source where you found this Oxeye? I have found that exact plant that you picture growing somewhere near me. I looked around wiki and this is the closest i found and doesn't seem an exact match:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Wedelia.jpg

What kind of medicinal use do you notice that it has?
Kota Dubois


Joined: Oct 13, 2011
Posts: 171
    
    3
It's a Rudbeckia laciniata, which I think has a common name like a green coneflower. I've got many of them. They grow into fairly deep shade, self seed moderately, are a long lived perennial, transplant easily and are quite pretty, IMHO.


We cannot change the waves of expansion and contraction, as their scale is beyond human control, but we can learn to surf. Nicole Foss @ The Automatic Earth
Corin Royal Drummond


Joined: Dec 26, 2011
Posts: 18
Kota McCoy wrote:It's a Rudbeckia laciniata, which I think has a common name like a green coneflower. I've got many of them. They grow into fairly deep shade, self seed moderately, are a long lived perennial, transplant easily and are quite pretty, IMHO.


Rudebeckia's are close relatives of echinacea. Some, I'm not sure if this one, were used by Michael Moore as a feebler echinacea type medicine. Considering it's much more common than echinacea, it would seem to bear more study.
 
 
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