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Nutritional value of mulberry fruits ?

 
Guy De Pompignac
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Hi

(don't know the best forum for this question)


i search desesperatly the nutritional value of mulberry fruits (morus spp)

all results i get are about leaves, not the fruits

the best info i come with is in the picture joined to this post, but no info about amino acids ...

if you have more infos about nutrients composition, it would be great !

All permaculturists know that mulberry fruit is very good for poultry, but i would like to put some number on this assumption !

Thanks
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Jeff Millar
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Found this, it's a little more conventional. Hope it helps. My turkeys and chickens are crazy about mulberries.

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1961/2
 
Guy De Pompignac
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Hi,

thanks for the search, i should have mentionned that i first started with the USDA database, and that mulberries lack amino acids in this too


(in fact, i'm building a tool on USDA database to guess the value of some food for poultry, i join a picture of the results for 100g amaranth + 100g mulberries, see how frustrating is the lack of some values ? )

my prog is almost finish, but now i search some unconventionnal (and complete) ref (like sea buckthorn etc) to complete the picture

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Lee Einer
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Jeff Millar wrote:
Found this, it's a little more conventional. Hope it helps. My turkeys and chickens are crazy about mulberries.

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1961/2


Wild birds love mulberries, in part because they ferment on the tree and become bird hooch.

Later, one is afflicted by besotted birds crapping purple on one's car and driveway, flying headlong into windows, etc.

A lot of folks in the midwest dislike mulberries for this reason; The fruits are nice, but the disorderly, drunken, flying purple poopers are an irritant.
 
George Lee
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Location: Athens, GA/Sunset, SC
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I pick them off the tree at my buddies place. Very nutritious. Lots of phytochemicals. Great for colon, kidney, urinary tract health I've read. It doesn't hurt to include them let's say! Along with all the other fruits the creator has bestowed..
 
Suzie Browning
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I read this thread a couple of days ago and kept thinking to myself, but don't mulberries have 17% protein?

I finally found a reference on permacultre.org where Bill Mollison states White Mulberry is 17% Protein.  Is this just white mulberries or am I misreading the data you've show?

Edited to add: Permaguy, I ment to say, I like the tool you making.
 
Guy De Pompignac
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@suzie

i think of either mulberry leaves (15-25% crude proteins) or mulberry fruits but dry ?
 
Suzie Browning
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Ah, it didn't cross my mind you were talking dry. 
 
Guy De Pompignac
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Im' not, but maybe Mollison is
 
Jonathan Byron
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Here is one report specifically for the fruit.

. Per 100 g, the fruit is reported to contain 87.5 g water, 1.5 g protein, 0.49 g fat, 8.3 g carbohydrates, 1.4 g fiber, 0.9 g ash,

http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Morus%20alba



For mulberry fruits that are dried to the point of having all water removed, we are talking 66.4% carbohydrates, 12% protein (8.3 grams carbs per 12.5 grams dry weight, 1.5 grams protein per 12.5 grams dry weight).  And it takes 8 pounds of fresh fruit to get one pound of perfectly dry mulberries. 

The leaf has more protein on a dry weight basis (15-25%), less sugar, more starch and fiber. And the leaf yield per acre of protein is much higher.
 
Suzie Browning
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This is what I read from the "Permaculture Techniques" pdf download from Permaculture.org.  (http://www.permaculture.org/nm/images/uploads/Permaculture_Techniques.pdf)

White mulberry as chicken forage is as good as a double crop of grain. It is 17% protein. The mulberry crop is a very good chicken food for the period of bearing in which it occurs, and beyond it; because the chickens are getting seed long after the mulberries are gone.


I assumed he was talking about the fruit as I don't normally think about the chickens eating the leaves.  Do you know of anyone who has attempted to feed them dry leaves (whole, crushed, powdered?) in the winter (perhaps mixed with something else)?

Last year I froze mulberries to feed in the winter but with the small crop I had this year I won't be able to.  Looks like it would have been better  (more nutritious) to dry them instead. 

I am raising meal worms to replace the mulberries this winter. Permaguy, have you considered adding meal worms or other insects to your tool?

 
George Lee
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Its interesting, mulberry contains resveratrol which is of special interest in red wine/grapes for health.

"The berries contain resveratrol, another polyphenol flavonoid antioxidant. Resveratrol has been found to be protective against stroke risk by alteration of molecular mechanisms in blood vessels, reducing susceptibility to vascular damage through decreased activity of angiotensin (a systemic hormone causing blood vessel constriction that would elevate blood pressure) and increased production of the vasodilator hormone, nitric oxide."

 
Jonathan Byron
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Suzie Browning wrote:
Last year I froze mulberries to feed in the winter but with the small crop I had this year I won't be able to.  Looks like it would have been better  (more nutritious) to dry them instead. 


Drying does not increase the actual amount of protein or sugar, it just concentrates it. Since a person or farm animal will drink water to make up the difference, there is no value in drying fruit when it comes to nutrition ... it might make sense for preserving the fruit.

Dried mulberries are not much richer in protein than raisins. Extra fruit is a good source of calories for chickens or other farm animals, it will provide them with energy, maybe fatten them up if they have enough. But it is not a good protein source, not a balanced diet. Mulberry leaves are better in that respect, they are comparable to hay.
 
Guy De Pompignac
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Suzie Browning wrote: Do you know of anyone who has attempted to feed them dry leaves (whole, crushed, powdered?) in the winter (perhaps mixed with something else)?


Get a look at Effect of Poultry Feed Supplemented with Mulberry Leaf Powder on Growth and Development of Broilers

and Utilization of mulberry leaf
meal (Morus alba) as protein
supplement in diets for
laying hens


Permaguy, have you considered adding meal worms or other insects to your tool?


I can add whatever is relevant about permaculture, i just need numbers
(there is a raw snail in USDA database but again no info about amino acids)
 
Guy De Pompignac
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Suzie Browning wrote:
I read this thread a couple of days ago and kept thinking to myself, but don't mulberries have 17% protein?

I finally found a reference on permacultre.org where Bill Mollison states White Mulberry is 17% Protein.  Is this just white mulberries or am I misreading the data you've show?



I think i have the answer, the 13-17% come from the % of protein w.r.t. the other two macronutrients (fat and carb)

By the way, i finally got it !

http://www.bacsa-silk.org/user_pic/Bursa_proceedings.pdf#page=533


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Jonathan Byron
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One of the major nutritional benefits of mulberries for humans will not be found in most reductionist discussions ... the anthocyanin pigments (red/purple/blue/black) influence the body in many desirable ways, but are not accounted for in the 1950s thinking that is limited to protein/carbs/fats/vitamins/minerals. Anthocyanins benefit blood sugar control, inflammation, blood pressure, and dozens of other real factors, but to a reductionist, mulberries are 'mostly sugar' and are though of as being little different than sugar candy. 
 
Ann Corkery
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Jonathan, do WHITE mulberries also have anthocyanidins?
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/email
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