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Ways to us Purslane?

Jeanine Gurley
steward

Joined: May 23, 2011
Posts: 1392
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
    
  10
Looking for different ways to use purslane.

I have added the bruised leaves to my tea and also like it minced and added to omlets.
I tried it in salads but it seemed a little too sour for me.

Also, I really want my husband to start eating it - he'll go along with just about anything if I can hide the taste - he doesn't like it.  But I don't want to ruin the benefits by cooking it to death either.


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Steven Baxter


Joined: Mar 22, 2011
Posts: 254
I've tasted it before but have never tried this idea. Balance the sour taste with some fats and sweetener, aka oil and honey in an herb dressing

Toss some fresh herbs, good oil, garlic, mustard, purslane, an egg, maybe vinegar if needed, into a blender and give it a spin. just play around with ratios until you get what you like.
Jonathan 'yukkuri' Kame


Joined: May 23, 2010
Posts: 488
Location: Foothills north of L.A., zone 9ish mediterranean
    
    3
I recently transplanted some wild purslane to my garden, and it is doing well.  I've nibbled on the leaves a little, and I like them just by themselves.  In a few weeks I'll be ready to try some recipes.  Anticipating.

This purslane pesto looks tasty:

http://www.grouprecipes.com/62049/greek-style-purslane-pesto.html

Turkish yogurt purslane salad sounds tasty, too.  


Jordan Lowery
volunteer

Joined: Sep 26, 2009
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
    
  11
purslane taco's, cook the meat with seasonings, mix with the raw purslane, fill taco's, load some fresh garden salsa, slap on some sour cream and enjoy.


The ultimate goal of farming is not the growing of crops, but the cultivation and perfection of human beings. - Masanobu Fukuoka
ronie dee


Joined: Mar 04, 2009
Posts: 587
Location: Cosby MO
    
    2
South Carolina wrote:
Looking for different ways to use purslane.

I have added the bruised leaves to my tea and also like it minced and added to omlets.
I tried it in salads but it seemed a little too sour for me.

Also, I really want my husband to start eating it - he'll go along with just about anything if I can hide the taste - he doesn't like it.  But I don't want to ruin the benefits by cooking it to death either.


It seems that the malic acid /sour taste is 10 times greater if harvested in the morning:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portulaca_oleracea


Sometimes the answer is not to cross an old bridge, nor to burn it, but to build a better bridge.
richard valley


Joined: Aug 18, 2011
Posts: 195
Location: Sierra Nevada mountain valley CA, & Nevada high desert
Greetings, What you call purslane, we know as perper. We grew it on the ranch in southern California. It starts late here in the mountains at 6800ft, so we have it in the greenhouse.
I love it cooked with eggs, flavored with lemon.

Just found this forum, have a great day.

Richard
Dw Cress


Joined: May 25, 2010
Posts: 24
Food that is too sour can be balanced out with salt and vice versa. I learned this from the food network, a la Jamie Oliver.
Jim Clare


Joined: Sep 02, 2011
Posts: 3
I sauteed it with onions and garlic and it was pretty good. It grows in the cracks of my patio.
Tyler Ludens
pollinator

Joined: Jun 25, 2010
Posts: 5326
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
    
  20
I made muffins with purslane seeds when I was a child.  I think I got the recipe from one of Euell Gibbons' books. 


Idle dreamer

 
 
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