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Lawn chair-quite literally!

Joel Hollingsworth
volunteer

Joined: Jul 01, 2009
Posts: 2103
Location: Oakland, CA
I just saw this on Reddit:

A cardboard cutout of a (quite literal) lawn chair. I think the idea is brilliant.

The comments section mentioned that most of the form should be filled with a soil mix rich in gravel and sand, to avoid compaction and allow for drainage. I think most good turf species wouldn't mind reaching down a few more inches to get to really good soil.


[Thumbnail for lawn_chair.jpg]



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paul wheaton
steward

Joined: Apr 01, 2005
Posts: 14985
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
    ∞
So the cardboard rots?  Does it keep it's shape?  Do people have to trim it?

Does the grass look greener on the chair?



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Kirk Hutchison


Joined: Feb 05, 2010
Posts: 418
Location: Los Angeles, CA
    I would spend many a pleasant hour napping/reading on one of those if I had one.


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paul wheaton
steward

Joined: Apr 01, 2005
Posts: 14985
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
    ∞
I would think I would wanna work in a fair bit of sand/gravel lower down so that it could drain well. Especially in the core of where the butt goes.

Kirk Hutchison


Joined: Feb 05, 2010
Posts: 418
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Definitely.
Joel Hollingsworth
volunteer

Joined: Jul 01, 2009
Posts: 2103
Location: Oakland, CA
paul wheaton wrote:So the cardboard rots?


Yeah, I think so.

paul wheaton wrote:Does it keep it's shape?


Not perfectly, but I bet the right soil mix & choice of turf species would help quite a bit.

paul wheaton wrote:Do people have to trim it?


Maybe. Or animals. Or a very low-growing lawn mix could be used.

paul wheaton wrote:Does the grass look greener on the chair?


Maybe not greener, but definitely less diverse. I think they used sod to illustrate the idea. I would be in a hurry to prove the concept, too, if the idea were mine.

paul wheaton wrote:I would think I would wanna work in a fair bit of sand/gravel lower down so that it could drain well. Especially in the core of where the butt goes.


Me, too. My ideal mix (without having experimented at all) would be mostly crushed stone, the sort you'd make Macadam with, to improve its ability to hold its shape. Then just enough sand and compost to almost fill the gaps in the gravel.
                                  


Joined: Jan 29, 2010
Posts: 26
Location: central kansas
If you go to farmshow.com and search for sod sofa there's an article on how to make that.  I think either would be pretty cool.  Just don't wear anything white so the grass stains are less noticeable. 
                    


Joined: Oct 23, 2011
Posts: 0
That's cool. I need a couple down at the edge of our meadow, under the trees so we can sit and watch for deer and elk. 
                    


Joined: Oct 23, 2011
Posts: 0
what an interesting idea, would love to see more pic from folks who have made one!
joi moore


Joined: Jun 20, 2012
Posts: 2
I would like to know how you mow the chair
John Polk
steward

Joined: Feb 20, 2011
Posts: 6493
Location: Moving to: NE Washington USDA zone 5 Western steppes to the Rockies
    
133
Nice. A couple of those around the BBQ would be nice.
Just need to figure a way to keep the poultry form taking them over.

Fred Berg


Joined: Jul 27, 2012
Posts: 6
Location: Connecticut: Zone 6a
I'd like to make a couch like that, only out of potato plants...
Jeanine Gurley
steward

Joined: May 23, 2011
Posts: 1392
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
    
  10
That is really cool! I'm thinking some of my chocolate mint would be heaven to sit in.


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Tim Crowhurst


Joined: Jun 18, 2012
Posts: 45
Location: Bedford, England: zone 8/AHS 2
    
    1
Joel Hollingsworth wrote:
paul wheaton wrote:Do people have to trim it?


Maybe. Or animals. Or a very low-growing lawn mix could be used.


You could also use a mixture of resilient low-growing plants like thyme or chamomile.
Devon Olsen


Joined: Nov 28, 2011
Posts: 996
Location: SE Wyoming -zone 4
    
    6
definately an interesting idea... im gonna have to watch this thread so that i can keep track of ideas that people ocme up with, i like the idea of thyme and chocolate mint perhaps...
how about a planted bed/on ground hammock?


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Richard Johns


Joined: Jul 21, 2012
Posts: 9
Location: Kenyucky
Just spotted this thread. The chocolate mint does sound wonderful. My idea would be to plant one in creeping yellow sedum, just for a conversation piece. Or one in white flox for early spring pizazz.


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Marc Troyka
volunteer

Joined: Jul 02, 2012
Posts: 356
Location: East Central GA, Ultisol, Zone 8, Humid
    
  14
This is pretty cool stuff. I would think sedum acre would be uncomfortable and might attract bees. Creeping thyme/corsican mint would probably be a bit more comfortable but thyme definitely attracts bees. I would think either sagina subulata or real mosses would probably work best. Also, I would think that a good amount of clay would help hold the shape and hold enough water for whatever you plant.
 
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