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Weeping willows near pond?

Renate Howard
pollinator

Joined: Jan 10, 2013
Posts: 755
Location: zone 6b
    
    9
I've read a lot of people warning others away from planting weeping willows. Especially near ponds where they will 'drink' up all the water, drop toxic amounts of leaves and branches in the water, and be a nuisance. But to me they are beautiful and fit nicely into my plans for drought-reserve fodder - in the event of a drought I can cut branches to feed the cattle, saving on hay expenses. I'm thinking of harvesting cuttings once the trees get going to play around with living fences for decoration and shade for the animals and kids.

We have a brand new pond. The dam runs North-South and the pond is on the East side, so to the West is a very steep slope down the side of the dam into a deep gully. The guy drove his tractors all around, I guess compacting the soil so the pond would hold water, but all winter it's been eroding on the sides leading down to the pond as the water runs down the hill over the areas the tractors killed the grass so there's a lot of bare dirt, and some of it is subsoil that turns rock-hard as soon as the sun dries it! I got 2 huge bales of rotting hay to try to mulch it so the native grasses and "weeds" I planted can have some hope of growing before the soil dries to too hard for the roots to penetrate.

I need to stabilize the bare soil before the rain carries it all into the pond.

I need to cover that steep slope on the West side of the dam.

I'd really like to plant my two weeping willows somewhere, maybe downhill from the pond if that's the best place.

I'd like a shade tree on one side of the pond to cut down on how hot the water gets in the summer, and for a nice place to sit and fish. The state gives free fish to people with new ponds - bluegills, catfish, and bass.

I'm zone 6B.

OK. Advice?? (Thanks!!)
Jay Hayes


Joined: Dec 20, 2012
Posts: 62
Location: Missouri
    
  15
Hey Renate,

I don't know much about weeping willows, so I can't answer any of your questions. I am hoping some knowledgeable folk will see youf post though, so I am going to piggy back a question of my own here. I am curious if weeping willow branches can be propagated the same as other willow cuttings? I am guessing yes?

Thanks

J
Renate Howard
pollinator

Joined: Jan 10, 2013
Posts: 755
Location: zone 6b
    
    9
I can answer that one - YES! They root if you look at them dirty.
Miles Flansburg
steward

Joined: Feb 03, 2011
Posts: 2501
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
    
  68
I guess I look at things differently from those who's comments you have read. I think willows are great. Create shade where you need it. Lots of biomass. Sucking up water and humidifying your air. Thus more cooling and moisture for other plants. Leaves in the water to help seal the pond and help the water beings. My property has several distinct areas. I would much rather sit and enjoy the areas under the trees than bake out in the sagebrush. I think mother nature agrees.
Marianne Cicala
volunteer

Joined: Aug 14, 2012
Posts: 441
Location: south central VA 7B
    
  37
We have willows on a couple areas around our pond. They will not emply your pond, unless it's only a couple feet deep. I would not recommend putting anything with a big root system anywhere near or on your dam. Although it sounds like you may a bit of an issue with your dam already, putting any form of tree will end up weakening it further.


Marianne

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Renate Howard
pollinator

Joined: Jan 10, 2013
Posts: 755
Location: zone 6b
    
    9
The roots wouldn't hold the soil in place?
Lance Kleckner


Joined: Feb 22, 2013
Posts: 85
Location: West Iowa
    
    1
They may help hold the soil, but what about years down the line when they have massive roots and what happens when those roots start to rot? Water could also follow along those large roots and cause leaking in your pond. Your dam will will have problems. Weeping Willows are very picturesque when grown along ponds, with their weeping branches dabbling along the water. I guess if not much water runs in the pond, then large trees sucking up water could be problematic, but has there been anything scientific to prove it all? I'm sure their large size also helps shade the water, and causes less evaporation and trees tend to make an area more humid..


http://www.fastgrowingtrees.us/KlecknerOasis
http://www.bigfootwillow.com
Lisa Paulson


Joined: Apr 17, 2010
Posts: 254
Thanks for this thread, while I am not going to plant a weeping willow near my small pond, this is giving me some inspiration to plant one on a wet area that is not growing much else . It may potentially give some fuel, fodder, privacy and imrove that wet area by drying it up some ?
Marianne Cicala
volunteer

Joined: Aug 14, 2012
Posts: 441
Location: south central VA 7B
    
  37
Any tree or even shrub with an extended root system will comprimise a dam and weaken the structure just like a side walk that begins cracked by tree roots. grasses are the best answer to hold soil and help stablize the integrity of the dam.
Jay Hayes


Joined: Dec 20, 2012
Posts: 62
Location: Missouri
    
  15
Renate Haeckler wrote:I can answer that one - YES! They root if you look at them dirty.


Thanks Renate.

I've never been much of a looker...so I guess i'll try talking dirty to them and see if that works too!

J
Rebecca Norman
pollinator

Joined: Aug 28, 2012
Posts: 386
Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 11,000 feet
    
  25
Lisa Paulson wrote:Thanks for this thread, while I am not going to plant a weeping willow near my small pond, this is giving me some inspiration to plant one on a wet area that is not growing much else . It may potentially give some fuel, fodder, privacy and imrove that wet area by drying it up some ?


Just to clarify... If you've got a wet area, you can easily plant any kind of poplars or willows, not just weeping willow. They are very tolerant of wet feet.

Most (or all?) kinds of willows and poplars can be propagated for free, by cutting any size cutting you like during the dormant period (winter until early spring, but not after the leaves swell, so act now), sticking it about 1/3 below ground and 2/3 above ground, keeping the ground moist, and then, if you like, looking at it dirty too.

Works at a residential alternative high school in the Himalayas SECMOL.org . "Back home" is Cape Cod.
Cj Verde
pollinator

Joined: Oct 18, 2011
Posts: 3235
Location: Vermont, off grid for 22 years!
    
  54
This thread needs a visual:


I'm going to plant some cuttings over the next few weeks to put outside the fence of my paddocks so the livestock can munch on any branches that hang over the fence.


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