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Indonesia Sulawesi

 
            
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Hi I guess I am all alone here in Asia. Though i am originally from BC Canada.

Are there any other Permies in Asia?
 
                              
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Not completely alone , I'm a british guy living in the New territories in Hong Kong, have just started looking for a piece of land near where I live, to plant a food forest , issue I have is that although organic farming is now fashionable trying to find someone to discuss permaculture and using perennials and no dig farming is tough.

are you aware of any good resources listing plant species for tropical and sub- tropical climates , Hong Kong is sub- tropical bordering on temperate in Oct Nov Dec. Also any suggestions on trees/perennials for providing bulk carbohydrates in sub-tropical climates ?
 
                                        
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BC canada here aswell, tho ive been planning to make use of family land in malaysian borneo..
 
Bumbu Regina
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Location: Bali, Indonesia
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Yeah I know how you feel! Despite the proliferation of permaculture leads in Asia it can be hard to track down exactly what's happening. One gets the feeling there are lots of redundant links and projects! Anyway, I am currently living in Bali and am on the lookout for any permaculture projects in South East Asia. Please contact me about anything going on that I can collaborate in! How is the project going in Honk Kong these days?
Bumbu
 
Nemo Lhamo
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I have some pics from my last trip of edible plants of the Philippines. I was thinking the same thing for a food forest. Banana trees are the most obvious. I hear they are tastier when grown in sub tropical climes. http://www.dpi.qld.gov.au/26_16680.htm Palm trees are the second most popular. Then mangoes(a nice shady tree for the patio), papaya, apples, oranges, etc, Go to your local fruit market and see what you find the most tasty.

If there is any interest I will dig them up. I found that if you have a machete in the Philippines you never need go hungry.
 
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