Permies likes permaculture and the farmer likes Transplanting elderberries permies
  Search | Permaculture Wiki | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies | World Domination!
Register / Login
permies » forums » growies » permaculture
Bookmark "Transplanting elderberries" Watch "Transplanting elderberries" New topic
Author

Transplanting elderberries

darius Van d'Rhys


Joined: Jul 07, 2011
Posts: 56
Location: SW Virginia Mountains, USA
I have about 2 dozen native elderberries that I started from cuttings 6 months ago. I was hoping to sell some but that hasn't happened. I'm wondering if I can transplant a few of them now into my garden along the fence line. I already transplanted them from starter pots into tall tree pots about 4 months ago, and they had lots of roots. When I moved them a month later to a different location, they were already starting to grow roots out of the pots.

Many sources say to transplant in spring. Any first-hand experience?

I'm in Zone 5b, or maybe 6a, in the Virginia Appalachian Mountains.


http://www.2footalligator.blogspot.com
Eric Thompson


Joined: Apr 23, 2011
Posts: 233
Location: Bothell, WA - USA
    
    1
Given plenty of water, I'venever had trouboe transplanting elderberries in any season..
Gail Farquhar


Joined: Jun 24, 2012
Posts: 4
Location: Coastal Texas
In my experience elderberries transplant VERY easily as long as you keep them well watered. I have moved them any time from our hot humid summers to the middle of what passes for winter here along the Gulf Coast and they have all thrived.
Brenda Groth
volunteer

Joined: Feb 01, 2009
Posts: 4433
Location: North Central Michigan
    
    8
i agree, give them not only lots of water, but if you can get a little soil from the area that grows the elderberry parents, add some of that soil to the hole you plant in, that will give you some good fungi to help the roots..also you might want to bury some woody stuff in the soil and make sure that they get lots and lots and lots and lots of water.

elderberries do tend to have some problems with transplant shock if not property cared for..water ...mulch..proper soil..are helpful


Brenda

Bloom where you are planted.
http://restfultrailsfoodforestgarden.blogspot.com/
Eric Toensmeier
Author


Joined: Oct 14, 2011
Posts: 102
    
  30
I agree, when I worked at Tripple Brook Farm we transplanted them any time to a moist location. With that being said, the lowest stress for the plants would be to plant them when dormant in early spring after the ground thaws.


Author 'Perennial Vegetables', co-author 'Edible Forest Gardens'.

Website - http://www.perennialsolutions.org/
Alex Brands


Joined: Jul 25, 2011
Posts: 53
Since you are transplanting from pots, their roots will be intact, so I doubt they will have any trouble, especially now that the hottest part of summer is over.

Alex
darius Van d'Rhys


Joined: Jul 07, 2011
Posts: 56
Location: SW Virginia Mountains, USA
Thanks for all the replies.

Alex, the roots have all grown down into the soil from the drainage holes in the bottom of the pots. I don't want to cut the pots as they were special order and not cheap.
 
 
subject: Transplanting elderberries
 
cast iron skillet 49er

more from paul wheaton's glorious empire of web junk: cast iron skillet diatomaceous earth sepp holzer raised garden beds raising chickens lawn care flea control missoula electric heaters permaculture videos permaculture books