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Some hastily ordered plants, no idea where to plant

Brandis Roush


Joined: Apr 16, 2012
Posts: 37
Location: Central Minnesota
So last February, long before I started learning about permaculture, I ordered some plants from a budget nursery. I've never been inspired much by gardening strictly for aesthetics (which is why permaculture appeals to me so strongly- I appreciate aesthetics but always thought it was silly to put a lot of time and money into something that was ONLY pretty, I want pretty and _____, which permaculture provides), but there are a few really ugly, neglected spots right in front of my house, so I decided I just needed to buy one of those pre-planned garden thingies and be done with it. Now that I'm so much more inspired to design these areas according to the tennets of permaculture I now have no idea what to do with most of these plants.

First, there are four hummingbird trumpet vines. They are listed as aggressive climbers, so I'm wondering what the heck I was thinking ordering them- I am totally freaked out by climbing plants because, well, my mom always taught me that climbing plants are pure destruction, and these were ordered in addition to the pre planned garden. I probably ordered them because they were on sale, I do that sometimes. I have a few bare spots against my house I was thinking about building a trellis in front of (far enough away from the house to be able to trim the vine off, I don't want it growing into my siding). Or I could train them to a tree, or one of the two utility poles in the yard.

There is a burning bush, pretty sure I'll just stick it in somewhere in one of my permie beds in front of the house where I feel it will enhance the aesthetics. I tried a search to see if there were any other benefits to the plant and didn't find anything- does anyone know any different?

There are also mixed painted daisies, ground cover daylilies, giant bearded iris, english lavender, mixed dwarf asters, double peonies, mixed creeping phlox, golden sundrops, and orange glory butterfly plant. Here's what little I know about some these plants:

painted daisies are pyrethrum, right? I tried to grow some from seed last year and was unsuccessful, so I'm glad to have starts of these this year. But it doesn't list the scientific name, so are painted daisies always pyrethrum, or are there other species also sold as such?

Obviously lavender is good, I also tried to start some last year AND grow from starts, and neither did well. What kind of conditions are ideal for lavender?

I know the butterfly plant will attract pollinators (that's pretty obvious. And I know I'm not a big fan of irises.

Other than the obvious flowers attracting beneficials, are there any other things I should consider when deciding where to plant these? The reason I chose this particular pre planned garden was because it provides three season color, so I'm glad I at least got a mix that should provide me with flowers most of the growing season.

Any input on any of these plants would be much appreciated. Otherwise I'm just going to try to work them in with more useful plants in my zone 1. At the very least it's motivated me to move faster on developing my zone 1, as I had been working more on my food forest and my raised bed vegetable garden (there's no abandoning that yet, I love it too much!), even though I know we're supposed to start with zone 1.
Tyler Ludens
pollinator

Joined: Jun 25, 2010
Posts: 5320
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
    
  20
I agree with your idea to incorporate them into the Zone 1 plantings. The flowers will attract beneficial insects and native pollinators. Daylily and lavender are edible.

Beware of trumpet vine because it is extremely aggressive. Though I love it, I have avoided planting it because it travels away from where you plant it, and comes up in unexpected spots. I have seen it punching up through an asphalt parking lot!


Idle dreamer

Matt Smith


Joined: Feb 04, 2012
Posts: 181
Location: Central Ohio, Zone 6A - High water table, heavy clay.
Tyler Ludens wrote:I agree with your idea to incorporate them into the Zone 1 plantings. The flowers will attract beneficial insects and native pollinators. Daylily and lavender are edible.

Beware of trumpet vine because it is extremely aggressive. Though I love it, I have avoided planting it because it travels away from where you plant it, and comes up in unexpected spots. I have seen it punching up through an asphalt parking lot!


Ditto. I have some along a tree-line between me and my neighbors (it came with the property), and would have colonized much of the yard near there if I didn't constantly mow the shoots that pop up into the grass. Very aggressive.
Brenda Groth
volunteer

Joined: Feb 01, 2009
Posts: 4432
Location: North Central Michigan
    
    4
find a large pot and put those trumpet vines in that..then you can control their root runners (which cause the invasiveness) then send them up over a trellis of some sort..they do get large and very high up.
it will also draw hummers so in front of a window where you can see them from inside or near an outside seating area.

the burning bush would be a good protector for some more tender plants, or to give shade to a shade lover..so don't discount it's use..also they are gorgeous in the fall so put it where it will be pretty complement in late fall..they get extroidinarily bright red.

I can see where the flowers were meant to complement the burning bush as their colors will..the painted daisies are great for insectary plants, the bearded iris will be beautiful and will hold the soil so if there is any erosion put them there, otherwise both should go in front of the burning bush ..lavender (if it likes the climate) gets quite large like the burning bush so place it also in the background ..you can sell crafts made of the lavendar so google those ..if so you'll want the flowers for those..the peonies will be gorgeous, they MAY grow quite large also, be careful when you plant them to just barely cover the eyes..they make wonderful cut flowers, the creeping phlox are a ground cover that will feed the early bees, mine are in bloom here in Michigan right now..put them near the front of the bed, the sundrops are going to spread also, but they are pretty and the insects love them, so put them somewhere you don't mind them spreading, they have a lovely gold/red color mix as there are touches of red here and there in the opening of the flowers, and butter yellow when open, the butterfly plant is a lower spreader so center of the bed..great for an insectary.

all fit well into a permaculture garden..


Brenda

Bloom where you are planted.
http://restfultrailsfoodforestgarden.blogspot.com/
Brandis Roush


Joined: Apr 16, 2012
Posts: 37
Location: Central Minnesota
Thanks for all the great info! All of that will be super helpful in choosing where to plant all of this!

I may only plant one single trumpet vine, in a pot, and get rid of the other three. They cost me exactly $4 total, so it's not a huge loss.
Brenda Groth
volunteer

Joined: Feb 01, 2009
Posts: 4432
Location: North Central Michigan
    
    4
pot them up, put in a small trellis and offer them for sale for a couple bucks each at the roadside, return your cost.
Brandis Roush


Joined: Apr 16, 2012
Posts: 37
Location: Central Minnesota
That's actually a good idea. I'm lucky () enough to live on the corner of a major highway, and I intend to set up a little table there for much of the summer to sell excess produce, eggs, and other things. I've even thought of getting a table at the farmer's market. I could also sell excess perennials when I do that- lots of people around here do that. But the more I think about it the more it seems possible to bring in a small but significant second income from my little "farming" endeavors here. I mean I'm going to do them anyway, so I might as well try to offset some of the costs.

If I do get a table at the farmer's market I'll also sell jams and jelly and stuff (allowed in Minnesota under the "pickle law"- don't know how other states handle that). I have been making this really awesome wild violet jelly lately just because I can and because I love the way it turns out, and in talking to a neighbor the other day (who was selling perennials out of her garage- I'm going back to get more today if I can get moving!) I discovered that she sells half pints for $10, since it is "gourmet" jelly! I canned most of mine in 4oz jars, which I could probably sell for $5 or $6 apiece. From the two batches I've made already, assuming I can sell them all, that's $80 in jelly that cost me about $15 (in jars, pectin, and sugar) to make. Not bad.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/email
 
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