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Welcome to Permies.com. Introduce Yourself...

Ken Peavey
steward

Joined: Dec 21, 2009
Posts: 2057
Location: FL
    
  43
I did a search and realized we do not have a place for Introductions. There are lots of new members joining every day. I think it would be friendly to tell us a little about yourself....

I live in north Florida, work for an industrial contractor as a foreman. That means I put on boots and yell at people most of the day.
I steward just under 4 acres of pasture with some woods around the edges. Instead of a dog, I went a miniature bull-a Lowline Black Angus. There's a couple of roosters around to keep the hens in line. This year I added 3 turkeys to the flock. Next year I'd like to get a couple of pigs. There are some fruit trees-Japanese Plums, Lime, Apple, with more on the way. Pecans, hickory and pignuts grow wild in the forest.
I'm doing what I can to develop this place into an All-Natural farm. Beds are in the works to grow vegetables. I intend to grow enough to open a Pick-Your-Own Vegetable operation to the public. Things are falling in place, but it will be a couple more years before I am able to flush the job.


Seed the Mind, Harvest Ideas.
http://farmwhisperer.com
Leila Rich
steward

Joined: May 24, 2010
Posts: 3471
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
    
  63
I like this "hello" idea!
I live in a little wooden house in the middle of the deep, dark...suburbs in Wellington, New Zealand.
My property's small, about 4000 suare feet all up and there's stuff growing around, up and over everything.
My long term-mission is to maximise water-harvesting and passive solar energy, but considering I do various community gardening/education/roles-they-haven't-invented-titles -for type things, I'm always broke and any solutions must be cheap, small and slow.
Luckily that's all part of the permaculture ethos
I don't have any domestic animals; it's either chickens or a garden for me, and there's no contest! Luckily I know plenty of people I can swap things with for eggs.
Fred Morgan
steward

Joined: Sep 29, 2009
Posts: 961
Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
    
  11
We live on a small property, for a Texan. :

Okay, to be serious, we live in Costa Rica though from the USA. We own and manage plantations of trees, which are creating a permanent forest, which will be selectively harvested, hopefully forever. Our company makes doors, flooring, etc, but we also sell wood. We are currently in the plantation phase and starting first thinnings, which includes added back in some more diversity.

In total, we have about 350 hectares, or nearly 900 acres. The hobby plantation where we live is about 30 hectares, and a river runs along the side of it. We have also built ponds for fish, etc.

I am slowly turning everything into a food forest as well, since I like to eat, and love to see wildlife.

Running our company is my real job, but I used to be in software (engineer, architect, director, etc.) and still do some consulting when I get the urge.

We have been married for more than 30 years and still think it was a great idea.


Sustainable Plantations and Agroforestry in Costa Rica
Dale Hodgins
pollinator

Joined: Jul 28, 2011
Posts: 3511
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
    
  40
Fred Morgan wrote:

We have been married for more than 30 years and still think it was a great idea.


That is probably a major key to your success. A couple that gets along will almost always have a major advantage over those who are on their own. Every week I check the new building permits as part of my work. The vast majority of permits are obtained by couples who have plans to stay together. Building a house often tests the relationship. I know several couples whose relationship has survived a build, and I know of a few who fought and spent their way to personal and financial ruin.

High schools often have programs where they pair off the kids and get them to raise a plastic baby. Rather than center on reproduction, I'd like to see if they can get along while building or growing things.


QUOTES FROM MEMBERS --- In my veterinary opinion, pets should be fed the diet they are biologically designed to eat. Su Ba...The "redistribution" aspect is an "Urban Myth" as far as I know. I have only heard it uttered by those who do not have a food forest, and are unlikely to create one. John Polk ...Even as we sit here, wondering what to do, soil fungi are degrading the chemicals that were applied. John Elliott ... O.K., I originally came to Permies to talk about Rocket Mass Heaters RMHs, and now I have less and less time in my life, and more and more Good People to Help ! Al Lumley...I think with the right use of permie principles, most of Wyoming could be turned into a paradise. Miles Flansburg... Then you must do the pig's work. Sepp Holzer
Renee Stauffer


Joined: Feb 03, 2012
Posts: 2
Location: way northern ny
I'll de-lurk and introduce myself.

I discovered these forums a couple of months ago and have been lurking and searching old threads ever since. What a great site! I live in northern NY state, up in the north east corner. Three kids ages 10, 6, 3 and a husband, two dogs, two cats, 20 chickens, 6 ducks, no partridge, but I do have 2 pear trees coming this spring! I used to be a registered nurse, but I don't work outside the home since having kids; I homeschool my kids and tinker with my crazy little projects.

I love this forum! Yay! Now I can post and not feel like a poser.

Renee
Ken Peavey
steward

Joined: Dec 21, 2009
Posts: 2057
Location: FL
    
  43
Great to have you around, Renee. Any of those chickens qualify as French Hens?
Kathy Burns-Millyard


Joined: Feb 17, 2012
Posts: 75
Location: Arizona low desert
Hello, I'm Kathy

I lurked around here for close to a year and finally signed in a couple of weeks ago. I live off grid on 7 acres in a low desert area of Arizona. I'm a freelance writer/author and photographer and work from home using a tethered cell phone.

It's just me, my husband and a house dog at the moment. We have 4 grown kids in different parts of the world. No livestock or chickens yet because we don't have a well or other source of water. We haul in about 100 gallons every week or two for the basics.

We do have lots of critters: coyote, bunny rabbits, jack rabbits, javelina (wild pig), road runner, quail, misc birds, etc. we even had a visit from a gila monster once

I'm working on a variety of water harvesting and dry gardening projects. I have hopes of someday being able to eat some of my crops before the bunnies do.

I enjoy all of the ideas and interaction here


Personal projects occasionally added at http://www.sasez.com - Photos & Books at http://www.electronicperceptions.com
Leila Rich
steward

Joined: May 24, 2010
Posts: 3471
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
    
  63
bump
David Bates


Joined: Dec 05, 2011
Posts: 78
Location: Mountain Grove, Ontario, Canada
Hi.

I'm a bit of a hermit who's been living in a suburban neighbourhood but is about to move onto some undeveloped land that I own. We (the other hermit and I) have thirty acres of round granite ridges with forested meadows between them, a fair amount of swamp and *tons* of rotted limbs and old stumps from when the previous owner took out most of the canopy trees (the big ones).

Our plan is to move out into the wilderness and live as simply as we can. So I've really enjoyed lurking on Permies picking up a few tips and ideas about what we can do while we are there. As I mentioned I have tons of rotting wood, so I guess you know what kind of gardens I'll be making while I wander around, do my hermit thing

much of what my neighbours consider to be good I consider to be bad
Chris Lumpkin


Joined: Apr 11, 2012
Posts: 41
Location: Mechanicsville, VA (zone 7a)
    
    4
Greetings everyone. I have been lurking here for a few months, taking in lots of info and watching Paul's Youtube videos and listening to podcasts. Actually, I realized that Paul and I go back many years, since I am also a software guy and I have frequently visited JavaRanch when researching stuff for work. Thanks Paul! My partner and I are burning our candles at both ends trying to become more self-sufficient while we are still giving our 40 to the man every week. We both work for state agencies in Richmond, Virginia, and we live in the sub-suburbs about 20 minutes outside the city. I am a software architect, she is a data analyst. She has one teenage daughter who lives with us, I have five kids (from 9 to 21) from my previous marriage who visit us frequently.

Our home was originally a Habitat house two owners ago, roughly 800 square feet with one actual bedroom. While it may not qualify as a "tiny house", once you pack in 7-8 humans, 5 dogs, and 2 cats, it is a pretty cozy squeeze. We have been making that work since I moved in 2 years ago, and we are building a fairly conventional "workshop" (we call it the "bunkhouse" when there are no building inspectors around) which will serve for overflow sleeping and hanging out. We love our tiny electric bills and small space to clean, and we're excited about our outdoor spaces and permaculture projects.

Although we live in a fairly suburban area, our house is on a private road and we are zoned for agricultural use. This gives us quite a bit of freedom when it comes to building codes and animals. We have a small flock of 6 free range laying hens (v 1.0) and one rooster who live in a stationary coop in back of the house. We got a dozen chicks from a breeder 2 months ago, and they are just moving into a mobile coop with portable electric fencing (v 2.0) for paddock-style egg laying chickenhood. I also just got three honeybee hives set up this spring, starting with traditional Langstroth for now.

We have 3.3 acres, with about one acre cleared and the rest in perhaps 50-ish year succession with tulip poplar, a few oaks, sugarberry, sumac, black walnut, birch, and more I am learning about. There is also tons of black locust around, but we don't seem to have any at our place - probably due to an incursion of paper mulberry (all male, no fruit, rapid growing and root suckering), which I am slowly fighting back and hope to replace with the BL and native mulberry and other fruit trees. We are both pretty horrible at growing annuals that need to be watered and weeded and raised into adulthood - we keep trying, but we are also planting lots of trees and weeds and other perennials. There are tons of great weeds in our area, and we are supplementing these with a few weedy medicinals and accumulators. I am working on a permaculture design for our place, so we can try to fit things into a bigger picture where our land can support us and our chickens, and perhaps some pigs?

We are struggling to balance our jobs and raising our kids with doing what we can to become a self-sufficient homestead, or ideally a net exporter of calories. As our kids grow up (and my child support bill drops ), we are hoping to be prepared to "retire" and leave the cubicles behind. I turn 40 this year and my lady is 45, so we are looking forward to spending a good bit of our lives in the dirt!

I have really been enjoying these forums, getting a lot of info and inspiration. Thanks Paul and everybody here for creating this space!

grateful soil-worshiping tree-humping permacultural minarchist localvore beekeeper
Peony Jay


Joined: Mar 24, 2012
Posts: 145
Location: B.C.
I'm Peony. I'm a Canadian gal. I live in the centre of BC. 5 acres with a seasonal creek. Zone 5. Rural but 10 minutes to town.
I'm new to permies and have only known about 'permaculture' for maybe 5 years. I've always been an organic only gardener, try to eat as much organic as possible. I'm an ex-vegetarian and ex-cook/teacher/world traveller...

I'm settled and boring now. I've been domesticated. Married, one kid, one pet...

40's, fit, funny (I have a quirky and dark sense of humour)

I love- gardening, cooking, music, dancing, music fests, being outside, biking, reading (mainly Buddhist stuff)...

I dislike-shopping, commercialism,keeping up with anyone named Jones, Hatfield OR McCoy, snootiness, rude people, people who always have to have the last word, racism, small mindedness,homophobia...


My Marxist Feminist Dialectic Brings All The Boys To The Yard!
wayne stephen
steward

Joined: Mar 11, 2012
Posts: 1186
Location: Western Kentucky-Climate Unpredictable Zone 6b
    
  46
I live in Western Kentucky at the southwest edge of the Cumberland Coalfield , USDA zone 6b. We have 20 ares of mixed use land that has N and S facing slopes, 9 acres of pasture land and about 6 acres of woods. My beautiful wife and smart 15 year old daughter live here with our chickens, turkeys , and Pepper - a tabby that catches more rodents than a mousetrap. I have 25 and 27 year old son and daughter living out west .We have vision of converting this to permaculture farm that supplies us with food and income , trade items. This is a very conservative area- not many hippies - and I would love to see a permaculture based community develop. I work as a Registered Nurse - am currently Director of Nursing at Nursing Home. I see the care of the elderly as the culmination of what permaculture idealizes. If we cannot respect and recieve wisdom from the care of the elderly we are doomed. What does permaculture say about end of life issues in our culture ? But that is a subject all its own. This site has helped me to wrap all the crazy ideas I have had into a holistic vision, Thank You all . Especially Pauls videos and Skeeter Pilarski - what a couple of characters.


Permaculture is CPR for the planet !


Peony Jay


Joined: Mar 24, 2012
Posts: 145
Location: B.C.
Nice to make your acquaintance, sir. *hand shake*
I, too, love Paul and Skeeter's videos. So helpful and encouraging. I'm not the only nut out there. Phew!
wayne stephen
steward

Joined: Mar 11, 2012
Posts: 1186
Location: Western Kentucky-Climate Unpredictable Zone 6b
    
  46
Thanks - and to officially introduce myself Wayne Stephen is my first and middle name . Last name is Charbonneau.
Rion Mather


Joined: May 31, 2012
Posts: 644
    
    1
Hi all. I love the vibe of the site. The open exchange of ideas is most welcoming.


http://woodstoves.forumotion.co.uk/forum
Ken Peavey
steward

Joined: Dec 21, 2009
Posts: 2057
Location: FL
    
  43
Welcome aboard folks!
Evelyn Smith


Joined: May 06, 2012
Posts: 14
Location: Rice WA Zone 6

I've been lurking a while also. My son and I just moved onto
our land a few months ago we're really excited about
our permaculture farm! Finally, after twentysome
years of trying, we're ready! We are in eastern Washington,
zone 6, and just a few minutes from Canada. We have 22
acres, abt half is pretty flat, the rest is conifers on a sharp
incline.lots of wild turkeys and coyotes.
This is a great site with so much good Information. It's amazing
how helpful you all are!

Evelyn Smith
Ken Peavey
steward

Joined: Dec 21, 2009
Posts: 2057
Location: FL
    
  43
Good to have you around, Evelyn.
 
 
subject: Welcome to Permies.com. Introduce Yourself...
 
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