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Could anyone help me identify this plant?

Ashley Ross


Joined: Mar 01, 2012
Posts: 79
    
    2
I was thinking it might be a type of holly, which wold excite me because then I could use the leaves as a caffeine source in a coffee substitute blend

Also the berries look like juicy speckled jelly beans! Not that holly berries are edible (I don't think...).

Anyhow, if it helps I'm located in northeast Alabama and the area the plant grows gets really moist some parts of the year and is in a lot of shade. I think there may be some oaks growing nearby as well, and a few kinds of mosses as well.

And a lot of the soil on our land is clayey.

Ok, thanks to anyone who takes the time to reply with some info


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Tyler Ludens
pollinator

Joined: Jun 25, 2010
Posts: 5326
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
    
  20
Not all hollies contain caffeine, or not in significant amounts. Yaupon Holly Ilex vomitoria, is the one with the most caffeine native to the US.


Idle dreamer

                            


Joined: May 29, 2010
Posts: 126
Location: Ava, Mo, USA, Earth

I don't recognize the species, but I'd be willing to bet the Genus is Elaeagnus. There are some that fruit in winter or early spring.

None of the hollys I know have juicy berries, but the Elaeagnus do.

Some Elaeagnus spp, are edible, some taste horrid, but as far as I know none are toxic, but don't try one until you're sure.

homesteadpaul
Ashley Ross


Joined: Mar 01, 2012
Posts: 79
    
    2
Wow! How awesome. I looked up Elaeagnus, and found pictures. I clicked on one for a site and I think it is Elaeagnus umbellata. Thanks so much!!! I will look more into it to see if it is edible or palatible at all
Ashley Ross


Joined: Mar 01, 2012
Posts: 79
    
    2
OOH!! I found this site! Still looking up info, but I thought this was some fun info:

http://www.naturalmedicinalherbs.net/herbs/e/elaeagnus-umbellata=autumn-olive.php
Tyler Ludens
pollinator

Joined: Jun 25, 2010
Posts: 5326
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
    
  20
Ashely, here's a website you might find helpful: http://www.pfaf.org/user/default.aspx
Ashley Ross


Joined: Mar 01, 2012
Posts: 79
    
    2
Vrry cool
Deb Stephens


Joined: Dec 03, 2011
Posts: 193
Location: SW Missouri
    
    6
I'd say this photo definitely confirms this is an autumn olive.

http://tenn.bio.utk.edu/vascular/database/vascular-photos-enlarge.asp?CategoryID=Dicots&FamilyID=Elaeagnaceae&GenusID=Elaeagnus&SpeciesID=umbellata&PhotoNameID=el_umbe4&PhotographerNameID=Steve Baskauf
 
 
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