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Plants to grow in Outer Banks, North Carolina?

Shailor Clark


Joined: Apr 16, 2011
Posts: 34
Location: Roanoke Island, North Carolina
Heya folks, I live on the Outer Banks of North Carolina and have a small 1/2 acre plot, used to be a pine forest many moons ago.

My grandfather had planted fig trees, grape vines & pear trees which are all now well established.

Two years ago we got a few hens and I added some blueberry bushes, loquat trees, strawberry plants. We have a few Daikon radishes, mint patches & echinacae throughout the yard. Also I've been adding wild mint, wild carrot, yarrow, & wild mustard randomly. We have seasonally been growing squashes, tomatoes, carrots, & cucumbers but I really would like to establish perennials.

I believe in Food not Lawns.

I've read about Jerusalem Artichokes and most definitely want to grow those.. I posted in the seedswap thread about looking for some tubers..

I would love to hear any recommendations of what else to grow
Alder Burns
pollinator

Joined: Feb 25, 2012
Posts: 958
Location: northern California
    
  31
You might exploit the fact that you are probably a zone or more warmer than the mainland, being surrounded or partly surrounded by water. Look around at what other people are growing. I would venture that the hardier citrus might be possible....


Alder Burns (adiantum)
Amedean Messan
pollinator

Joined: Nov 11, 2010
Posts: 876
Location: Burlington, NC, USA - Woodland, Clay - Zone 7
    
  28
Yeah, I would definitely try to grow some citrus - try satsuma orange for starters.


Those who hammer their swords into plows will plow for those who don't!
Shailor Clark


Joined: Apr 16, 2011
Posts: 34
Location: Roanoke Island, North Carolina
Awesome thanks much for the idea.
I like how the satsuma look, cold hardy up to 20 degrees and I believe a few will be a wonderful addition to the yard.
Apparently they are hardy to 20degrees, and this past winter it only got below freezing maybe 7 days out of the entire winter.

The loquats are probably one of my favorite fresh fruits now. They almost have a citrus like flavor.

Do you know of any reputable dealers I could get some from? Or maybe even some seed. I may also ask the local nursery if they would be able to get some.
Alder Burns
pollinator

Joined: Feb 25, 2012
Posts: 958
Location: northern California
    
  31
The Meyer lemon is as hardy or hardier than mandarins. Think about Mexican types of avocado also, such as "Del Rio", "Mexicola" etc. Jelly palm (Butia). These things can be hard to find...you might have to go mailorder. Especially don't trust a big chain nursery (like Lowe's, Home Depot, etc.) to sell adapted plants...do the research. Wind and salt spray might be problems for some of these leafy, evergreen trees....might need a good windbreak for them to thrive. --Alder
Amedean Messan
pollinator

Joined: Nov 11, 2010
Posts: 876
Location: Burlington, NC, USA - Woodland, Clay - Zone 7
    
  28
@ Shailor Clark

I don't know any sources to get satsuma personally because I live in the piedmont area but I find Dave's Garden a good source to browse and read reviews. There website is a little tricky to navigate but they are a wealth of information.

http://davesgarden.com

Also what just came to mind was growing fresh green tea here in NC. I wrote a thread a while back on the issue with a link to a supplier of a cold hardy Camelias variety.

http://www.permies.com/t/8196/permaculture/Zone-Hardy-Camelias-black-green
http://www.camforest.com/Camellia_sinensis_s/34.htm

@ Alder Burns

Nice suggestion, I will look into this.
Jeanine Gurley
steward

Joined: May 23, 2011
Posts: 1392
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
    
  10
I am in midlands SC and you can probably grow two of the perennial crops that I am just a 'bit' too south to grow: 1. Rhubarb and 2. Ramps. As for the Ramps I do not know the botanical name (lots of things have been called ramps) but I find them at roadside markets when I visit N.C. They are too STRONG SMELLING for some people but when I smell them I immediately remember a skillet full of ramps, bacon and potatoes. Yum. They grow wild up there in in the Cherokee area I believe there are some restrictions on harvesting them.

Other than that I think you are already growing everything I am growing. Did you mention pecan? I have 5 pecan trees and have never bothered to collect them. This year they were selling retail $14. for less than a pound!

Garlic chives go like crazy. I don't eat the chives that much but I am crazy about the little pods after the flowers form. Right after the flower a little green seed pod forms and while it is still tender I take them. Saute in everything and sometimes I freeze them to use later.

I am building my regular garlic crop a little each year. Not a perennial but it takes so little of my time that I consider it so. Pull up around June or July and replant when the moon waning in late september or october. The rest of the time I pay no attention to them.


1. my projects
Tyler Ludens
pollinator

Joined: Jun 25, 2010
Posts: 5326
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
    
  20
Here is a listing of perennial vegetables for hot and humid climates: http://perennialvegetables.org/perennial-vegetables-for-each-climate-type/hot-and-humid/

The unfortunate thing is many of them are difficult to find seeds or plants of, in my experience.....you really have to search around to find them, as many are uncommon....


Idle dreamer

Jeanine Gurley
steward

Joined: May 23, 2011
Posts: 1392
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
    
  10
Thanks Tyler, there are a few plants there that I have not heard of.
S Bengi


Joined: Nov 29, 2012
Posts: 1044
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
    
    5
Check out this list for quite a few thinks that you can plant. Its me garden list and I am in Boston, MA. I would love to hear from you. https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AjpWBJwPQ0nMdEpjV1AwcVJ0dGFZbnVpVEw0RlFQR0E
Zach Elfers


Joined: Jan 12, 2013
Posts: 4
Location: Charlottesville, Virginia
Check out Ilex vomitoria "Yaupon holly." The Native Americans brewed it into a tea called black drink. Very tasty, and very healthful. The Yaupon holly grows wild all over the islands. I have found quite a bit of it in Manteo. Depending on how much space you have, it might make a nice addition to a corner somewhere. Of course, you could just wild forage it!

Maybe you could have success with Prunus maritima "Beach plum"? The natural range is Maine-Maryland, but you might have success with it on OBX.

You might have success with Pawpaw and groundnut (Apios americana) as well.
 
 
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