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Anyone using pressure cookers?

Carolina Hecht-Nielsen


Joined: Feb 23, 2012
Posts: 5
Location: Escondido, Southern California
I am the only person I know besides my mom who uses a pressure cooker. Anyone have any favorite recipes, uses?
Mine is so old that it is impossible to find a replacement for the stretched out rubber ring.
What brands would you recommend if I was not to come across one at the thrift store?
Thank you
Carolina
John Polk
steward

Joined: Feb 20, 2011
Posts: 5851
Location: Moving to: NE Washington USDA zone 5 Western steppes to the Rockies
    
  88
I love pressure cookers. They save so much time (and energy). A pot of beans in one hour!
Also great for tenderizing those cheaper cuts of meat.

I had my rubber seal out for cleaning. (I think) one of the kids tossed it in the trash. I need a new pressure cooker.
Saybian Morgan
volunteer

Joined: Apr 22, 2011
Posts: 580
Location: Lower Mainland British Columbia Canada Zone 8a/ Manchester Jamaica
    
    7
I pressure cook with a All american 21 quart pressure cooker, I just don't like to brag about it.
It's too big for a night's meal, but i can make allot of dog food out of misc stuff......
Alison Thomas
volunteer

Joined: Jul 22, 2009
Posts: 933
Location: France
    
    5
Do you know, it's almost the only kitchen gadget that I don't have! My husband was laughing the other day and saying that we'll NEED one soon (that's apparently what I always say when I have my heart set on something!). I'm watching to see the replies on this one to see just how folk use them in day-to-day life and to see if we really do NEED one.
John Polk
steward

Joined: Feb 20, 2011
Posts: 5851
Location: Moving to: NE Washington USDA zone 5 Western steppes to the Rockies
    
  88
Many time consuming meals like beans or beef stew that normally take 3-4 hours can be done in an hour with a pressure cooker.
Even if your time means nothing to you, think how much less fuel you will be using. And what a bonus during those hot days of summer when nobody wants to heat the whole house to cook dinner.

Cheap cuts of meat become "fall off of the bone" tender in no time. This saves a lot of time if you if you are canning soups, stews, etc.

Most of the ones I have seen come with a brief cook book. It is enough to get you started, and your imagination working. Once you get used to it, you will find many uses for it.
Chaya Foedus


Joined: Feb 20, 2012
Posts: 16
I just recently researched these myself. I had a customer request one, but before I started to sell them I needed to know if it was a healthy mode of cooking (some conflicting literature out there), and that I was getting the very best product. I was surprised at how difficult it was to weed through all of that junk on the internet (why I was surprised, I don't know).

I have determined that it's completely safe (and preferable) cooking method in these situations:
1) High Altitudes (due to the increased boiling point of water)
2) Brown Rices, Grains, and Legumes (if anything, it improves these foods by bringing out the flavor, reducing phytic acid, and increasing nutritional content)
3) When energy-saving is a concern
4) Soups and Stews (but keep in mind the veggies will have a lower nutritional value after this treatment)
5) Convenience--if this is an important factor for you individually.

We have decided to sell the "Chef's Choice" line (which is by "Wisconsin Aluminum", the same company that makes the All American pressure canners/cookers). We love that these are stainless steel--watch out, a lot of the older ones (and newer ones too) are aluminum! I don't know if you know anything about the All American pressure canners/cookers, but they are hands-down the best and safest on the market--these "Chef's Choice" are too.

I don't actually have these up on our website yet, but I do have one in stock. If I felt nudged (wink), I could be persuaded to launch this line with a coupon code for faithful Permies readers


pantryparatus.com
Produce, Prepare, Preserve your own food surplus
richard valley


Joined: Aug 18, 2011
Posts: 195
Location: Sierra Nevada mountain valley CA, & Nevada high desert
Greetings, Mamma had a pressure cooker as soon as they were available. My wife was uninterested, a couple weeks ago I bought one, wifey began using it and was amazed at the speed, tenderness and tast of the first dinner and all that she has prepared. I've been supprised how few people make use of them.
Casey Homecroft


Joined: Feb 03, 2012
Posts: 20
Location: Ohio, Zone 6a
I got an All-American last year and used it lots and lots for pressure canning. Love it! One of my favorite things to do is make a huge pot of chili in the crock pot, and then can it in single-serve pint jars using the pressure canner.
Carolina Hecht-Nielsen


Joined: Feb 23, 2012
Posts: 5
Location: Escondido, Southern California
Thank you for your responses. I have also found some places where it says that pressure cookers save vitamins, minerals, flavor and color because the foods are cooked quickly in an airtight environment.

Chaya: what are the sizes available in the "Chef's Choice" line?
My old tired cooker is 4.2 qt, much too small for our family. I am looking for a 6 or 8 qt. stainless steel with the aluminum layered base.

Pressure cookers they save time, energy, work, vitamins, minerals, flavor and color.

A permies discount code would be awesome. Thank you,

Carolina
Brad Davies
volunteer

Joined: Sep 22, 2011
Posts: 212
Location: Clarkston, MI
    
    1
I've been wanting to get a pressure cooker for a while now, waiting for the right one on craigslist.

I had a few questions though:
Does anyone have suggestions of what is a good size?
Is a pressure cooker, pressure canner the same thing?

I would mostly like to use it for canning 1q and smaller jars, but having something to cook a meal in would be awesome too. Meal sizes around here are usually for 3-4 people.

Thanks!


SE, MI, Zone 5b "Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work."
~Thomas Edison
richard valley


Joined: Aug 18, 2011
Posts: 195
Location: Sierra Nevada mountain valley CA, & Nevada high desert
Brad, Some cookers come with a 4/8qt pot. It would be excellent to have both, the lid will fit both pots. For canning the 8qt would give you greater range with jar sizes.
Brenda Groth
volunteer

Joined: Feb 01, 2009
Posts: 4432
Location: North Central Michigan
    
    4
there are some great pressure cooker cookbooks, I even have one that has a cheesecake recipe..so..yeah, I use them..I'm looking at the new fangled ones to buy this summer.


Brenda

Bloom where you are planted.
http://restfultrailsfoodforestgarden.blogspot.com/
Eric Thompson


Joined: Apr 23, 2011
Posts: 212
Location: Bothell, WA - USA
Previously posted in http://www.permies.com/t/10990/cooking-food-preservation-food-choices/batch-cooking
2 things I make about weekly in an electric 6 qt pressure cooker:
=======================================

Soup is a regular for me, and I always make a point of filling up the 6qt pressure cooker when I make some. A regular base recipe with an onion, garlic, 1/4 cabbage, jar tomatoes, 2 cups lentils/chickpeas/beans, chicken stock, and whatever other handy items are hanging around: chicken, radish/turnip, greens, peppers, fennel, sunchokes...
Any leftover soup that cools goes into the freezer -- I use the restaurant style plastic containers for 8oz and 16oz portions (and all the lids match!)

The other one we do like this regularly is dog food meat: mostly chicken and scraps with bones included and pressure cooked for 90 minutes until the chicken bones are pretty soft... and the home-processed chickens make up a lot of this with necks, feet, livers, gizzards.... we freeze these side by side with batches of carrot, broccoli, squash, and sweet potato for a month of dog food!

=======================================

I would also recommend looking up a good recipe for "shoyu chiken" - a Japanese inspired Hawiian dish. My recipe is:
1/4 c soy sauce, 1/4 c cooking sake, 1/4 c vinegar (rice, apple, whatever..), 1/2 c water, 2 tbsp fine grated ginger, 4 cloves garlic
Mix these in the pressure cooker and add in chicken pieces tightly packed until they start to stick out of liquid (add a little more liquid if needed) - use bone or boneless chicken, skin or not as you like - boneless fits more though..
Pressure cook on high for 25 minutes, then remove meat and serve
My wife follows this up by putting some peeled hard boiled eggs into the leftover broth and letting them soak it up for 10 min or so while hot


I highly recommend the electric cookers for these kind of things, but not for canning unless you can find one that is bigger and flat on the bottom to hold jars...



Michael Brant


Joined: Jan 05, 2012
Posts: 12
Location: Ontario, Canada
Brad Davies wrote:I've been wanting to get a pressure cooker for a while now, waiting for the right one on craigslist.

I had a few questions though:
Does anyone have suggestions of what is a good size?
Is a pressure cooker, pressure canner the same thing?

I would mostly like to use it for canning 1q and smaller jars, but having something to cook a meal in would be awesome too. Meal sizes around here are usually for 3-4 people.

Thanks!


If you're waiting for an All American brand pressure cooker/ canner, hold out for the 930 or larger. It can take 2 levels of quarts whereas the 921 and 925 will only hold one layer. I have the 921 and regret not spending the extra money to get the 930.

I've used my pressure cooker mostly as a canner but one time I cooked a blade roast, which is a tough, grisly cut of meat in 45 minutes at 15 pounds. It was falling apart done along with the potatoes and carrots.

I've canned beef soup, chicken soup, hominy soup, carrots, green and wax beans, mushrooms, corn, turnip and tomatoes. I know you don't have to process in a pressure canner but I find it more enjoyable managing 4 inches of water in the canner vs a huge full water-bath canner boiling and splashing all over the place. It takes roughly the same time, perhaps a little longer. Because I can only do 2 levels of pints, I usually can using pints for our small family of 3. I may try to sell my 921 this spring and upgrade to the 925 or larger.
Amy Leonard


Joined: Dec 03, 2011
Posts: 13
Location: Louts, CA (USDA zone 7)

Mine is so old that it is impossible to find a replacement for the stretched out rubber ring.

You may need to find a "treasure store". In our town we have a hardware store that has been in business since well, forever. It is the oldest hardware store, west of the Mississippi. If you have such a place anywhere near you, call 'em. These guys have a drawer full of pressure cooker rubber rings, and a sheet that crosswalks rings to many models by many manufacturers.

If not, well, you could give these guys a call. http://www.placervillehardware.com/index.wml

Good luck!
Amy

~all knowledge is worth having~
Wilson Foedus


Joined: Nov 07, 2011
Posts: 43
Location: NW Montana
Brad Davies wrote:I've been wanting to get a pressure cooker for a while now, waiting for the right one on craigslist.

I had a few questions though:
Does anyone have suggestions of what is a good size?
Is a pressure cooker, pressure canner the same thing?

I would mostly like to use it for canning 1q and smaller jars, but having something to cook a meal in would be awesome too. Meal sizes around here are usually for 3-4 people.

Thanks!



Brad Davies,

The "best size" answer is "it depends." I personally own the All American Model 921 and love it and hope to buy another one this summer. But if you are running one big pressure canner you need to keep in mind that it takes longer to heat up at pressure and then to cool down again. This will extend the cycle time of one canning session. So in my opinion, it is better to have two smaller pressure canners so that you can have one cooling down, while the other is heating up.

A pressure canner and a pressure cooker are not always the same thing. The All American pressure canners are also pressure cookers, but not every pressure cooker can be used for pressure canning. While it is completely a non-issue for us for canning purposes, the All American is made by the Wisconsin ALUMINUM Foundry. Therefore is not a cooking surface that I like to use for food, but is completely fine for canning in glass jars. We have a separate pressure cooker for direct food contact.




pantryparatus.com - homesteading supplies
Rufus Laggren


Joined: Feb 23, 2012
Posts: 322
Location: Chicago/San Francisco
    
    4
I thought the gaskets for cookers were available back through the 40's some odd... Tried talking to the appliance parts houses and all that?

Here's a link that I found pretty neat - all about beans and pressure:

http://missvickie.com/howto/beans/howtobeantypes.html


Rufus
Duncan Dalby


Joined: Jan 22, 2012
Posts: 36
Location: England, Midlands.
We've been thinking about getting a pressure cooker but we were wondering weather it is possible to cook several different things simultaneously. We cook in a steamer at the moment and we tend to have things like root veg, broccoli/cauliflower and kale/cabbage, but they all have to be put on at different times so they are all ready together. Is it possible to do that kind of meal in a pressure cooker?
Ivan Weiss


Joined: Dec 19, 2009
Posts: 152
Location: Vashon WA, near Seattle and Tacoma
I have been using pressure cookers for more than 50 years. I have a 4-quart Mirro, a 6-quart Presto, and a 16-quart Presto, and I use all of them. The 16-quart Presto doubles as a canner. It holds 7 quart jars or 12 pint jars.

Just about all spare parts for all major brands are available here. They ship by USPS, but oddly, not to a PO box.

I find pressure cookers invaluable for cooking large quantities of dry beans or lentils, stew meat, meat stocks, or beef tongues, for boiling chickens or hogs' heads, or 10-15 pounds of potatoes at a time, or a bucket of rose hips. Small quantities of fresh vegetables are better steamed quickly, without pressure.

You cannot, should not, must not even dream of canning low acid foods, or meat or fish, without a pressure canner. The trick is not to turn whatever you can under pressure into mush.


Pastured poultry, pork, and beef on Vashon Island, WA.
Rufus Laggren


Joined: Feb 23, 2012
Posts: 322
Location: Chicago/San Francisco
    
    4
Reviewing the site I posted above I found this page listing parts sources:

http://missvickie.com/resources/parts.html

I saw a short article in the paper last week about electric pressure cookers. Removable/cleanable inserts, adjustable pressure, shut-off timers, delayed auto start; added options to slow-cook and in one case a rice cooker setting. Sorry, I find the Chicago Tribune site un-useable, but I suspect a quick google would glean many comments and reviews. Might use less energy than stove cooking when you're not heating anything else


Rufus
jet graphics


Joined: Feb 25, 2012
Posts: 2
I have a 6 qt Presto St.St. pressure cooker, bought in the late 1970s, and still cooking well. Replaced the gasket*, overpressure plug, pressure controller and even the handle.
Major uses :
[] Chicken - makes great chicken stock - and pressure cooking bone scraps is a great way to squeeze out nutrients - I like to use a blender to chop up the chicken bones and collect the marrow, etc., - strain out the bone chunks - ugly brown, but good with regular stock.
[] Soups (If you like Campbell canned soups, pressure cooked soups have similar texture)
[] Steamer - fast cook - but be careful, the safety lip tends to catch on steamer baskets on extraction
*Note-though you might consider oiling the gasket to make it easier to use, it will absorb the oil and stretch out of shape.

Looks like this vintage model:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Presto-Stainless-Steel-Pressure-Cooker-6-Qt-/280832885682?pt=Small_Kitchen_Appliances_US&hash=item4162f1c3b2

If I upgraded, I might buy the 8 qt. Presto St.St.model ($65 Amazon):
http://www.amazon.com/Presto-8-Quart-Stainless-Pressure-Cooker/dp/B0000Z6JIW/

And if I had spare $$$ would add this All American 921 21-1/2-Quart Pressure Cooker/Canner ($188 Amazon):
http://www.amazon.com/All-American-921-All-American-Pressure/dp/B00004S88Z/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=kitchen&qid=1282113626&sr=1-2
[] Aluminum [] No gasket [] can do pressure frying (like KFC) [] Good size for canning

{BEWARE - there are some used pressure fryers being sold on eBay that had been discontinued, due to their gaskets failing or scalding injuries from high pressure steam.}

Recipe resource: www.cooks.com search on "pressure cooked"
Wilson Foedus


Joined: Nov 07, 2011
Posts: 43
Location: NW Montana
Duncan Dalby wrote:We've been thinking about getting a pressure cooker but we were wondering weather it is possible to cook several different things simultaneously. We cook in a steamer at the moment and we tend to have things like root veg, broccoli/cauliflower and kale/cabbage, but they all have to be put on at different times so they are all ready together. Is it possible to do that kind of meal in a pressure cooker?


Duncan,

It is possible. If you use a canning jars, you can put venison on one and beef stew in another. It will depend on the time you are cooking it for. If you are not worried about sealing the jar, this would be a great way to use an old canning lid again. Or better yet, have you tried the Tattler reusable canning lids? They are wonderful.

Either way, you can do different things and not have them all mix together.

Brenda Groth
volunteer

Joined: Feb 01, 2009
Posts: 4432
Location: North Central Michigan
    
    4
good info to know about the e bay thing..as I was looking to upgrade..i have 2 pressure cookers now, small and large..and want a new fangled one someday
Aza Aguila


Joined: Feb 28, 2012
Posts: 26
Location: Costa Rica
Yes, we use a pressure cooker!

Living in Central America, where beans are a daily staple - it makes sense... cutting cooking time in half!

I make the food for our dogs and cat in it as well - a kilo of chicken parts (necks, wings, feet, etc), 6 cups rice, a few chopped carrots, cover with water and go....

I also love making soups. A well-loved soup I recently made in the pressure cooker went something like this -
3 cups cooked garbanzo beans, 4 stalks celery chopped, 3 chopped onions, 7 chopped tomatoes, a medium winter squash peeled and cut into chunks, 8 cloves garlic, 1 cup chopped green beans, 4 large mustard greens chopped, 1 cup cremini mushrooms in large pieces, 4 tablespoons butter, 1 piece kelp or kombu, a couple tablespoons sea salt, a handful of basil leaves, a few tablespoons fresh oregano leaves, a few tablespoons fresh rosemary minced, enough water to cover all about 1 or so inch... pressure for 30 minutes.


Community, Internships, Permaculture, Self-Discovery, Natural Healing, Sustainability http://www.Awakening-Soul.org
jacque greenleaf
volunteer

Joined: Jan 21, 2009
Posts: 458
Location: Underwood, WA (USDA zone 7, Sunset zone 3) - in the Columbia Gorge highlands
A note - if you live in the US, most likely your local extension office will test the accuracy of the gauge of your pressure canner. It's free health insurance, and they recommend you test your gauge annually. I've canned small jars of jam in my pressure cooker, but now that I have a pressure canner, I'll use that instead. The received wisdom is that most pressure cookers are insufficiently accurate for safe canning, especially for low acid foods.

If you are thinking about buying a pressure cooker, find a copy of Lorna Sass' book and read up.

Pressure cookers are great for beans, but if you care about how the the finished beans look, be warned that many of the beans will burst during cooking.
Jason Mendes


Joined: Dec 09, 2011
Posts: 15
I understand most people in this topic enjoy using a pressure cooker for it's faster cooking time and reduced fuel.. but really, i believe they are unhealthy, just one step below microwave cooking. Cooking food quickly is the danger. Good food is made slowly and often at low temperatures. A pressure cooker cooks food too quickly and above the boiling point. I would suggest soaking/sprouting foods before hand, even for more than a day. A sprouted pot of beans cooks quite quickly. I also actually do most of my cooking in the near opposite way, using a slow cooker, cooking at low temperatures over a long time makes the most tender soft beans (and grains, i also make rice). Think about it.. a builder has just one day to build a house, versus a whole season. Which house would be of finer quality and detail? I find a slow cooker is very convenient, too. I soak what i want to cook in it over night, sometimes more than one day (but change the water), and then just flip it on in the morning, and soon lunch (or dinner) is ready. Slow and steady wins the race, for me.
Jason Mendes


Joined: Dec 09, 2011
Posts: 15
Here's my recipe for slow cooker brown rice. I find that rice made any other way (like in a rice cooker) is just too hard and chewy, flavorless.

First i rinse the rice in a sieve, and massage it against the sides of the sieve. Then I soak it over night in water, just a little over the amount of rice. So if i make 1 cup of dry rice, i soak it in just over 1 cup of water. If i soak for an additional day (sprouting) i rinse and change the water, always with pure water, not chlorinated.

Once ready, i add an additional 1.5 cups of water if making 1 cup dry rice, so about 1.5 times the amount of rice (plus the original amount of soaking water). Then i set the slow cooker to high. It's done in about two hours. Very soft, sticky, easy to digest rice!

I have yet to try it, but i have read about a method called GABA rice, where over the period of a few days the rice is kept at a warm temperature, to sprout it, then cooked in green tea.
jacque greenleaf
volunteer

Joined: Jan 21, 2009
Posts: 458
Location: Underwood, WA (USDA zone 7, Sunset zone 3) - in the Columbia Gorge highlands
As Jason notes, you will indeed lose vitamins when you cook under pressure. Minerals and most human dietary proteins will not be affected. I don't know about the energy efficiency of pressure cookers vs slow cookers. Pressure cookers use any heat source, slow cookers require electricity, although I suspect most slow cooker recipes could be adapted for hay box cooking - one of the things I intend to experiment with some day!
Jason Mendes


Joined: Dec 09, 2011
Posts: 15
indeed about the hay box cooking! A survival/backpacking technique is to put what one wants to cook in a thermos, like rice, then put in boiling water and sleep with the thermos at your feet for added warmth. Overnight the heat is stored and the rice or whatever is ready to eat when one wakes up! So I bet it would work with hay box cooking.
Daniel Morse


Joined: Feb 13, 2012
Posts: 214
Location: SW Michigan
    
    3
Yes, i do for quick meals or tough meat if I am in a hurry. Great meals. However, it does zap a lot of nutrition out of veggies and I like them a little underdone. So, cook some with the meat and do the rest in an other pot. THATS what mom did and so did grandma. You get the best of all worlds. Chicken is so quick pressure cooked.

I have never met a stranger, I have met some strange ones.
Lloyd George


Joined: Jan 25, 2012
Posts: 159
there are pressure cookers out now, in which you can relieve the pressure..add in griedients, and be back up to pressur in a minute or two...cool stuff...

If you do a search for pressure cooker cookbooks, there are quite afew written for sailboat cruisers....
Saybian Morgan
volunteer

Joined: Apr 22, 2011
Posts: 580
Location: Lower Mainland British Columbia Canada Zone 8a/ Manchester Jamaica
    
    7
I used the pressure cooker tonight to steam up some rabbit heads for the dogs, they were so happy and are n so full off chopped up head sweet cicely and oats there laid flat out on the floor. I wish i did more cooking in it but it seems to be always used for weird things like undigestables like pigs feet that it's always in use but rarely for regular dinners. I did duck heads the same way for the dogs and the beaks go right through
Michael Radelut


Joined: Jan 21, 2011
Posts: 193
Location: Germany, 7b-ish
Saybian Morgan wrote:I wish i did more cooking in it but it seems to be always used for weird things like undigestables like pigs feet


Pigs feet and rabbit brains are highly nutritious, and regarded as delicacies in many parts of the world.
But you already knew that
Saybian Morgan
volunteer

Joined: Apr 22, 2011
Posts: 580
Location: Lower Mainland British Columbia Canada Zone 8a/ Manchester Jamaica
    
    7
The pressure cooker seems to cook things that only a babarian king like me would tare at with his teeth all night in front of a movie. I get so mad when my wife and daughter don't eat their meat right down to the marrow, the pressure cooker really helps them get at what only my fangs use to. Ugh the rabbit heads smelt so good last night I can't believe I gave it to the dogs, I'm all about tuckering into the bits nobody wants but many in the world would stand in line for. Beef tongue where I live cost more than a steak because they have to order the unwanted, i thought I was saving money going counter culture till i got to the register and found I had splurged on a bag of tongue and tripe.
Kay Bee


Joined: Oct 10, 2009
Posts: 471
Location: Jackson County, OR (Zone 7)
pressure cookers and canners are wonderful. I use a 4 quart mirro pressure cooker as a steamer and for shortening the time to cook beans or other items that typically would have to boil for hours. An hour at high pressure with a carcass also makes a very nice stock. I use the hell out of our presto canner, too. Meat, veggies, soups... a huge time and money saver!

Also, I second the sentiment on the Tattler reusable lids. Very handy and a bargain in the long term.


"Limitation is the mother of good management", Michael Evanari

Location: Southwestern Oregon (Jackson County), Zone 7
Peta Schroder


Joined: May 25, 2012
Posts: 62
Location: Australia
I've got a german pressure cooker and it's great. I don't believe it preserves any vitamins however as the reason it cooks so quickly is it is much much hotter than normal cooking. Most vitamins would be destroyed in the process. Minerals, however, are not destroyed so I use it to make soup stock. If I put a chicken carcass in there and leave it on low a couple of hours the bones have disintegrated. What this means is all the calcium, silica etc that was in the bones is now released into the stock water. Good stuff. Strain out all the solids and then add vegetables, meats etc to cook just enough rather than the pressure cooker's 'within an inch of it's life' method, and it will make a meal high in both vitamins and minerals.
Daniel Morse


Joined: Feb 13, 2012
Posts: 214
Location: SW Michigan
    
    3
I use my big canner for 2 quart and single quart jars of veggies and meat products. I use my small canner for meals or small jars of whatever. Maint is simple and easy. My old mirror works as good as new. I like ti better than the large one I bought a few years ago. My ex gave away all my canning equipment a few years ago. It is healthy and a great way for quick meals. I agree. For meal veggies a seperate pan is the best way, or use a smaller seperate pressure cooker. Veggies need a scant few min to be cooked and the longer cooked, the less vitamins. Have fun with them. They are a great tool. Word of advice. This year soon, geet your parts abnd new ones. The manager of the local harware told me he is having issues getting parts. Not being produced or found, he was not sure. It is a sighn of the times. Good Luck
John Polk
steward

Joined: Feb 20, 2011
Posts: 5851
Location: Moving to: NE Washington USDA zone 5 Western steppes to the Rockies
    
  88
Speaking of spare parts, many makes/models are no longer easily found. Parts can be difficult to locate when your local dealer no longer carries a line.

Here is a website that lists where to find parts for virtually any make/model in existence - very handy!

http://missvickie.com/resources/parts.html

(just scroll down the page, and a huge data base is there for your needs.)

 
 
subject: Anyone using pressure cookers?
 
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