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unusual foods that you have come up with

Brenda Groth
volunteer

Joined: Feb 01, 2009
Posts: 4433
Location: North Central Michigan
    
    8
I read on another thread about Kale chips..I'm
so amped to try them this year. But there must be other unusual foods that I've never tried and "enquiring minds want to know".

So would we all please list some of those really odd things that normal people out there in the world know nothing about that you fix either from your garden or from your pantry to eat, esp to not go buy the storebought goodies..

Right now I need to make things mostly from pantry staples..or from things that I have put up or grow in my garden, as my financial situation makes buying anything extra pretty much nil.

So lets get this thread going and bring it on..

Please include instructions or a link to instructions as well..here is a link to those kale chips mentioned above

http://glutenfreegirl.com/baked-kale-chips/


Brenda

Bloom where you are planted.
http://restfultrailsfoodforestgarden.blogspot.com/
John Crawford


Joined: Jun 06, 2011
Posts: 19
Onion Jam.

It started last fall when I needed to use 20lb of onions I could not store. I've since made a second batch and work and it turned out far better than the first. I'm sorry I don't have exact measurements yet but if you know how to can you should be able to dial it in.

Onions: Minced or Julienned, 10 cups
Sugar: White regular sugar 6+2-3 cups
Apple juice: or cider, whatever 6 cups
Apple cider Vinegar: 2-3 cups

You need 2 pans for this. I use stainless steel for jamming to prevent flavor transfer. You start by cooking the onions in a dry pan over medium heat to caramelize them. This can take 15 min or more and you have to stir frequently to prevent scorching. You know you are done when the onions are translucent and there is a thick layer of caramelized onion stuck to the bottom of the pan.
In the second pan start making your caramel. A good video of the process is here just use a regular pan instead of a pan for flan. deglaze the caramel with the apple juice. It will instantly crystallize, this is ok, just keep stirring. When all the sugar is dissolved pour the caramel sauce over the onions and return them to the heat. Bring to a boil and cook as you would to make a regular jam. When it is close to being done add the vinegar and enough additional sugar to give it the jam like consistency you want. When you reach 220 jar it up and water bath can for storage.

It should be noted this recipe uses NO oil. This is done intentionally to make it safe to can. It should also be noted that it's not going to be as thick as regular jam due to not having allot of pectin.
My idea for making this was to have caramelized onions available to use whenever I wanted. Just spread it on a burger/whatever. I have found it to be phenomenal on pork.
Brenda Groth
volunteer

Joined: Feb 01, 2009
Posts: 4433
Location: North Central Michigan
    
    8
that sounds really really good, being low acid is there any problem canning it..I suppose you could put it in the freezer too..but to have it ready instantly a jar would be best i guess.

I LOVE onions..thanks.

were your onions sweet onions or can you use the hotter ones in this recipe..i generally have a lot of the hotter ones on hand each year..as they are perennial here...carmalizing might make them sweeter
John Crawford


Joined: Jun 06, 2011
Posts: 19
Brenda Groth wrote:that sounds really really good, being low acid is there any problem canning it..I suppose you could put it in the freezer too..but to have it ready instantly a jar would be best i guess.

I LOVE onions..thanks.

were your onions sweet onions or can you use the hotter ones in this recipe..i generally have a lot of the hotter ones on hand each year..as they are perennial here...carmalizing might make them sweeter

They were sweet onions. And no there is no problem canning it. I bought a pH test kit to make sure that the pH was below 4.6 before canning. That's why I used the vinegar it dropped the pH as if you are making pickles. With the batch I made the pH dropped to 4.3 with 2 cups of vinegar so it was all good when I canned it.
John Polk
steward

Joined: Feb 20, 2011
Posts: 6582
Location: Moving to: NE Washington USDA zone 5 Western steppes to the Rockies
    
135
Not all onions keep well. That sounds like an excellent way to keep those that won't make it until next year's crop.
Leila Rich
steward

Joined: May 24, 2010
Posts: 3890
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
    
  80
Lacto-fermented garlic. Only if you're a garlic fan!
I had waaay too much garlic last year, including many quite small cloves.
Pour boiling water over unpeeled cloves, leave for a minute, drain and cover with cold water. Skin should come off easily.
Pack into small jars, sprinkle with uniodised salt and top up with whey or good water. Cover loosely with non-reactive lids, Lactobacillus is alive and heat kills it...
Stash for a couple of months. The fermentation process creates lactic acid which kills pathogens.
Mine was really tasty. Not raw garlic hot, but crunchy. I added whole star anise and chilli to some. Great on rice with soy and veges.
Fred Morgan
steward

Joined: Sep 29, 2009
Posts: 972
Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
    
  12
Hi Brenda, I made your topic a "sticky" so it would stay at the top. That way, people always see it.


Sustainable Plantations and Agroforestry in Costa Rica
Brenda Groth
volunteer

Joined: Feb 01, 2009
Posts: 4433
Location: North Central Michigan
    
    8
thanks, great idea.

I don't know how many of you collect wild berries for jellies but they really are fantastic. They make some very strong jellies with good flavor. My favorite is Elderberry as they are rampant in our area but last year I tried chokecherry and it was absolutely delicious, made a lot of gifts from them. I have plans this year to try barberry, buffalo berry, goumi or autumn olive, mountain ash and some others.

I make the usual black raspberry, red raspberry, blackberry, plum, peach, cherry, etc. Also I had been given some concentrated cranberry juice and some fresh pressed pear/apple juice last year that I made jellies out of, spectacular.
Suzy Bean
steward

Joined: Apr 05, 2011
Posts: 940
Location: Stevensville, MT
    
    8
I know most people compost their pulp from after juicing, but if I juice a bunch of carrots (often with apple, fennel, ginger, greens), I will mix it into a batter (that is hydrated) and bake it for a yummy sort of fry-bread. I butter a cookie sheet, and spread the mixture thin - it will crisp on the edges and be moist on the inside.
I usually mix the pulp with lots of egg, butter, some sweetener (I like coconut nectar), a bit of flour (I use tapioca starch), a bit of salt and cinnamon, some cut up prunes if I have them, some pumpkin seeds if I have them - whatever I feel like! My housemates and I always enjoy the results.


www.thehappypermaculturalist.wordpress.com
Katrin Kerns


Joined: Feb 08, 2012
Posts: 104
    
    2
Brenda Groth wrote:I read on another thread about Kale chips..I'm
so amped to try them this year. But there must be other unusual foods that I've never tried and "enquiring minds want to know".

So would we all please list some of those really odd things that normal people out there in the world know nothing about that you fix either from your garden or from your pantry to eat, esp to not go buy the storebought goodies..

Right now I need to make things mostly from pantry staples..or from things that I have put up or grow in my garden, as my financial situation makes buying anything extra pretty much nil.

So lets get this thread going and bring it on..

Please include instructions or a link to instructions as well..here is a link to those kale chips mentioned above

http://glutenfreegirl.com/baked-kale-chips/


This is such a great thread idea! I wish I had some recipes to share, but until I do I will enjoy the ones being posted here.


P.P.O.Y.T. (Playfully pouncing on your toes.)
Wilson Foedus


Joined: Nov 07, 2011
Posts: 43
Location: NW Montana
Suzy Bean,

Wow, now that sounds awesome! Composting is great, but why pass up on all that fiber? Great suggestion, I cannot wait to try it.

In the spirit of posting recipes for otherwise overlooked and surplus items, here are two that Chaya and I like:

Zucchini Chips: When the zucchini comes in bumper crop fashion, we slice them to about 1/4" thick, lay them on the dehydrator tray and sprinkle them with garlic salt. The result will blow your mind it is so good. If you want to take it up a notch, make a pesto with tomatoes and fresh garden herbs (whatever is on hand: basil, rosemary, etc.) and dip the zucchini slices in the pesto then dehydrate them. The result may change your snacking habits forever.

Potato water bread: Chaya is a great bread baker, so any questions about baking specifics should be directed to her. I however am the self-appointed bread eater in the family and I love it when she saves the water that she used from boiling the potatoes for the measured bread liquid. Here is her recipe (just substitute the warm water for warm potato water): http://pantryparatus.com/blog/bread_recipe/ The yeast loves the potato water, and the bread takes on a whole other flavor dimension. Pouring the water onto the compost bin would not be a waste either, but using it in bread helps to glean those otherwise lost nutrients.

Great thread Brenda!


pantryparatus.com - homesteading supplies
P Thickens


Joined: Jan 15, 2012
Posts: 177
Location: Bay Area, California (z8)
Cassoulet, AKA "How French folks cleaned out their fridge deliciously"

Prep your white beans, doesn't matter what kind.
Lay out whatever meats you have on hand; it's good to start with salt pork or bacon or something like that. Whack 'em up small.
Start browning your meats. Remove each batch. "Tsss! Tss!"
Sautee onions and garlic. Way more garlic than you think you'll need. Yeah, a little more. One more spoonful. Okay that might be enough.
Lob in some tomato paste at the end.
Glug in at least 2 cups of white wine. "Pshhhhhh!" Follow up with enough water or broth to cook the beans, bring to simmer.
Hoist in whatever herb you like, thyme works very well.
Fire up the slow cooker and add each ingrediant (Liquid and onion/garlic/mater+ long-cooking stew meats, then beans, then short-cooking meats like sausage + whatever veg you have on hand) in order so they'll come up done at the same time.
Adjust seasonings. I usually slap in some Worcester sauce.
Let it sit for 20 minutes to cool before serving. Even better (much better) the second day!
Brad Davies
volunteer

Joined: Sep 22, 2011
Posts: 212
Location: Clarkston, MI
    
    8
Dilly Beans - pickled green beans. Same process as pickles but with green beans. I have tried throwing a pepper or two in a few jars and it added a nice spice to them.

This was uncommon to me up untill a few years ago. A friend offered me some that his mother had made and I was hooked. Very good as is, also great mixed in tuna or salads.

SE, MI, Zone 5b "Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work."
~Thomas Edison
Brenda Groth
volunteer

Joined: Feb 01, 2009
Posts: 4433
Location: North Central Michigan
    
    8
lovin these...anyone have any recipes for using non free stone plums..we have access to tons of them but they are so hard to work with with those pits sticking hard to the fruit.
P Thickens


Joined: Jan 15, 2012
Posts: 177
Location: Bay Area, California (z8)
Brenda Groth wrote:lovin these...anyone have any recipes for using non free stone plums..we have access to tons of them but they are so hard to work with with those pits sticking hard to the fruit.


Boil them down, let it all fall through a wide seive except the pits and skins, can up the jelly/preserve/chutney.
Leila Rich
steward

Joined: May 24, 2010
Posts: 3890
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
    
  80
It's not really unusual, but a great way of getting through lots of Jerusalem artichokes.
Roasted Jerusalem artichoke soup
If the JAs are quite dirty, soak them for a while first, then scrub. Don't peel (actually, I would never. peel something so nobbly)
Cut massive tubers lengthwise.
Oil and salt well, I use olive. Roast until beginning to caramelise. About half way through add lots of chopped brown onion and whole garlic cloves. I want that caramelised too. It's important to develop the 'roasty' flavour.
BUT keep an eye the roasting veg, I don't want the garlic to burn!
When it's done to my satisfaction, I scrape it all into a pot, add water (chicken stock would be great) and have at it with the stick-blender. I like it very smooth, but that's just me
When it's pureed to my taste, I add a bay leaf or two and thyme and simmer for half an hour or so: I'm not into cooking soups for ages.
At the end, check salt, add pepper, grate in a little lemon zest and maybe a tiny bit of garlic since I like the fresh garlic hit.
JAs go really well with chicken. JA/chicken soup and good bread is fantastic!
Amedean Messan
pollinator

Joined: Nov 11, 2010
Posts: 837
Location: Burlington, NC, USA - Woodland, Clay - Zone 7
    
  26
That last post has got me salivating right now....


Those who hammer their swords into plows will plow for those who don't!
Brenda Groth
volunteer

Joined: Feb 01, 2009
Posts: 4433
Location: North Central Michigan
    
    8
me too Amed...

the stick blender is on my "hope to buy soon" shopping list..any suggestions on the best brands (probably another post here)..I've never owned one but see em on the cooking shows all the time..do have 2 regular blenders though.
Leila Rich
steward

Joined: May 24, 2010
Posts: 3890
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
    
  80
Stick blenders are cheap, but the main thing is they're really easy to use. Just poke it in the pot and whizz away. If I use a traditional blender I always make an enormous mess, but stick blender heads generally come off to wash.
David Goodman
volunteer

Joined: Dec 14, 2011
Posts: 345
Location: Zone 9a/8b
    
  14
Pear salsa.

Onions, garlic, cumin, whatever hot peppers are around, salt, black pepper, sugar, red peppers, vinegar and lots and lots of pears.

The flavor is amazing... and every batch is a little different.

This was an answer to overloaded pear trees one year. What do you do with 200lbs of pears? Pear butter... pears in syrup... dried pears... pear cider... pear brandy... pear salsa...


Permaculture, bio-accumulators, rare plants, tool reviews and lots and lots of gardening inspiration - a new post every day: http://www.floridasurvivalgardening.com
Brenda Groth
volunteer

Joined: Feb 01, 2009
Posts: 4433
Location: North Central Michigan
    
    8
last year I had bushels of pears, will have to try that one. I've never really done much "fruit" salsa. In reading the book the Coundry Living Encyclopedia I'm getting all kinds of ideas for things like fruit ketcups..they sound so good
P Thickens


Joined: Jan 15, 2012
Posts: 177
Location: Bay Area, California (z8)
Morning Porridge
Beans
Grains
Meat
Veg

  • Slap whatever beans you have on hand in the Slow Cooker. (I do this in great whopping batches ahead of time.)
    Lay out your chosen grains in order. I always use brown rice and quinoa. Then I add whatever else there is that's not enough for another recipe, but enough for this! When you lay them out in order, go from TAKES THE MOST TIME to TAKES THE LEAST. For me, thats Brown Rice (30 mins), then add Quinoa (7 mins) till the end of the cooking time.
    Brown your raw meat, if using. Add onion and garlic and celery if you'd like.
    Start your water/broth boiling in the pot you browned your meat. Add longest-cooking grains, count down (I use a timer) to the least-longest cooking grains. When 10 minutes from end or so, throw in whatever vegetables you have on hand and any cured meats like sausage. Carrots will take longer to cook, peas take less; you know what I'm talking about.
    When 5 minutes from end or so, pull the pot off the heat and let sit, lidded, for the grains to soak up any liquid.
    Add beans. Delish!


  • With 1 C Brown Rice, 1 C quinoa, and 1 C beans (dry measure), I add 3 C chopped veg and 1 C meat. That makes enough for 12 servings of very hearty, stick-to-ribs breakfasts!
    darius Van d'Rhys


    Joined: Jul 07, 2011
    Posts: 56
    Location: SW Virginia Mountains, USA
    I lacto-ferment many, many vegetables... from carrots to garlicky cauliflower. For one thing, it only takes non-iodized salt (no vinegar in these "pickles") and non-chlorinated water. But what is more important to me is that the lacto fermentation process actually increases the nutritive values. After they have fermented on the counter a few days, I tighten the lids and move them to my root cellar. They will keep a year or more at cool temps, but above freezing. You can also lacto-ferment fruits but they need to be eaten within a short time, before they spoil. I don't know why they don't keep as well as veggies.

    I just made some refrigerator pickles from the stalks of fennel bulbs, which usually go on the compost pile. I used orange juice + white wine vinegar, and orange zest.
    Recipe.: http://frombellytobacon.com/2012/03/12/orange-pickled-fennel-stalks/
    If my bulbing fennel crop does okay this year, I am going to try lacto-fermenting some stalks.

    I probably eat quite a few foods that many would consider "unusual" but I'll have to think on it!


    http://www.2footalligator.blogspot.com
    Jeremy Frank


    Joined: Apr 03, 2012
    Posts: 2
    Location: NE Washington and NW Montana
    Wow! You all are creative! Here's all I have to offer up: grilled pbj's. Me and the kids love 'em.


    http://www.montanahomesteader.blogspot.com/
    Dale Hodgins
    pollinator

    Joined: Jul 28, 2011
    Posts: 4063
    Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
        
      57

    Banana Peel "Coffee"

    I have come up with a coffee substitute which smells, tastes and looks more like coffee than any other that I've tried. It came about by accident. I had some organic bananna peels in the oven in order to finish the drying process so that I could crush them up as a granular fertilizer for indoor plants. They work great for that.

    I left them in too long and they got slightly scorched. Everyone agreed that it smelled like coffee, so I ground it up and made some. Smooth flavour with a coffee smell. Nice drinking.

    One problem --- A banana peel after taste. Fix that problem and you've got a million dollar idea.


    QUOTES FROM MEMBERS --- In my veterinary opinion, pets should be fed the diet they are biologically designed to eat. Su Ba...The "redistribution" aspect is an "Urban Myth" as far as I know. I have only heard it uttered by those who do not have a food forest, and are unlikely to create one. John Polk ...Even as we sit here, wondering what to do, soil fungi are degrading the chemicals that were applied. John Elliott ... O.K., I originally came to Permies to talk about Rocket Mass Heaters RMHs, and now I have less and less time in my life, and more and more Good People to Help ! Al Lumley...I think with the right use of permie principles, most of Wyoming could be turned into a paradise. Miles Flansburg... Then you must do the pig's work. Sepp Holzer
    wayne stephen
    steward

    Joined: Mar 11, 2012
    Posts: 1738
    Location: Western Kentucky-Climate Unpredictable Zone 6b
        
      92
    Kefir grains - available online and if you know a lucky person with some , they do reproduce slowly. Best way to deal with raw dairy and taste is stronger but more complex than yogurt. I obtained some and kept them in use for 3 years without fail. I even left them once and forgot about them in the back of the fridge for about a year and they kicked right back into gear. A variation is available that cultures water and fruit - a drink called Lassi. Add sliced fruit , berries , spices to sugar or honey sweetened water and Voila , tangy sparkly superculture drink. I think it would be great for anyone with gastroenteritis , I have heard that not many intestinal pathogens can compete with this stuff. Also do not forget about kimchee.
    "If you can't laugh its not funny anymore"-Wavy Gravy


    Permaculture is CPR for the planet !


    Fred Morgan
    steward

    Joined: Sep 29, 2009
    Posts: 972
    Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
        
      12
    Not sure if you will get the chance, but there are some of the banana family which if picked a bit green, are great boiled, like potatoes. Very tasty.

    Green plantains can be eaten the same way.

    Suzie Browning


    Joined: Jun 10, 2010
    Posts: 48
    Location: Southwestern Ohio
    John Crawford wrote:Onion Jam.

    It should also be noted that it's not going to be as thick as regular jam due to not having allot of pectin.



    You could try Pomona's Universal Pectin. (www.pomonapectin.com) I love this stuff for two reasons. 1. I can make my own recipes using any type and amount of sweetener I want. 2. It never expires.


    On the border of Zones 5 & 6 on the last 2 acres of what was once a large farm.  Flat, flat and more flat!
    Brenda Groth
    volunteer

    Joined: Feb 01, 2009
    Posts: 4433
    Location: North Central Michigan
        
        8
    wonder if the onion jam would thicken up more if it had some apple or crabapple thrown in, apples and onions are so good together and apples, esp crab apples are loaded with natural pectin
    Patrick Mann


    Joined: Dec 06, 2011
    Posts: 224
    Location: Seattle, WA, USA
    I came across this recipe for hop shoots that I intend to try as soon as the hops starts coming up:

    Boil in salted water for three minutes with a few drops of lemon juice. Toss with a little butter and serve.

    http://thirteenvegetables.wordpress.com
    Kate Nudd


    Joined: Dec 09, 2010
    Posts: 106
    Unusual use for a cup and a half of chickpeas( 1 can)
    Cookie Dough Dip
    In a food processor put:
    1 can of chickpeas ( rinsed and drained)
    2/3 cup of sweetener of choice( I use about half the amount or less)
    1/8 tsp of baking soda
    2 tsp vanilla ( or other extract)
    1/4 cup of nut butter of choice( I've used peanut butter)
    a few tbsp of a milk choice and equal amounts of regular oats
    I put on a few tbsp of large flake coconut
    Then process everything until smooth
    Mix in a few tbsp of caccao nibs/choc chips or nuts or dried fruit bits or whatever..
    Enjoy with graham crackers,fruit slices or ??cookies?

    There are numerous variations of this recipe on the internet. I learned of it a vegan potluck
    It keeps for a week in the refrigerator.
    Enjoy
    Share your experiments with this recipe,please.
    I imagine using pureed pumpkin with cloves,cinnamon,nutmeg,ginger with almong butter
    or rum extract with raisins added or??
    Who knew a yummy dip could be so healthy!!
    wayne stephen
    steward

    Joined: Mar 11, 2012
    Posts: 1738
    Location: Western Kentucky-Climate Unpredictable Zone 6b
        
      92
    I ate these at a Palestinian deli in Arizona. Green Almonds . Picked before the nut kernel forms , green all the way through. May be a way people have thiined a crop. But these are tangy and almost lemony . Some dip them in salt , I eat them straight. I live outside of almond country now , but I still think about those. Also at the same deli I've had feta cheese made from sheep , goat , cow , water buffalo , camel , and mares milk . All excellent.
    darius Van d'Rhys


    Joined: Jul 07, 2011
    Posts: 56
    Location: SW Virginia Mountains, USA
    Pickled garlic scapes
    http://2footalligator.blogspot.com/2010/06/pickled-garlic-scapes.html

    Orange Pickled Fennel Stalks
    http://2footalligator.blogspot.com/2012/03/what-to-do-with-fennel-stalks.html
    Dan Jones


    Joined: May 10, 2012
    Posts: 5
    Location: Palm Beach County, Florida, USA
    Papaya jerky. Thick slices of fresh papaya. Light sprinkling of sea salt on one side, light sprinkling of course sugar on the other, overnight in the oven @ 200 degrees (a dehydrator would be better). Not THE best thing I ever ate, but good sweet/salty snack that utilizes my free supply of papayas!
    Bella Donawitz


    Joined: May 18, 2012
    Posts: 15
    Lasagna with zucchini instead of noodles and thick roasted veg sauce

    I know this sounds obvious but.....

    chop some veggies up and brush them w/oil and tomato paste (or reduce stewing tomatoes) roast them save 1/2 and then pure the other half

    cut zucchini length wise salt it, let it stand to draw out moisture ( dab it w/ a cloth) bread the zucchini and fry lightly
    layer pureed veggie, zuchini, and roasted veggies together like a traditional lasagna
    if you have nutritional yeast sprinkle some on top.





    Bella Donawitz


    Joined: May 18, 2012
    Posts: 15
    also some 'wild' alternatives


    Fiddleheads: Named for their shape, these are found on bracken or ostrich ferns. They may be eaten raw or boiled. Don't confuse these with hemlock, which is poisonous.

    Read more at Trails.com: Michigan Edible Wild Plants |
    Trails.com http://www.trails.com/list_2478_michigan-edible-wild-plants.html#ixzz1vwNBIp1L

    I've had burdock root used in place of a carrot and diffrent edible flowers in salad
    dandelions are very tasty (roots use like carrots, leaves and heads in salads!)
    cat tails: use the root

    lambs quarters seem to grow everywhere, use much like spinach

    try making seed/nut butters (soak in water to soften. I find over night if fine. Blend seed/nuts with oil/water)

    If you have an herb garden flavour vinegar's to help you not hate salads

    *darius Van d'Rhys-AMAZING site. Thank you for the link.


    try and sprouting some of those lentils you must have! toss in some dandelion heads, pansy/marigold blooms toasted seed( I've toasted cucumber seeds) with oil and home made tarragon(or what ever herb) vinegar.
    http://www.sprouting.com/Seeds.html#lentils

    caramelize onions and use as condiments on sandwiches
    http://www.reluctantgourmet.com/caramelizing_onions.htm

    wayne stephen
    steward

    Joined: Mar 11, 2012
    Posts: 1738
    Location: Western Kentucky-Climate Unpredictable Zone 6b
        
      92
    Atypical American uses for Peanut Butter. Last night I had a pnut butter and avocado sandwich. No mayo. pnut butter on both pieces of bread , avo, onion, tomato, lettuce. Any combo of pnut butter and vegie sandwich is delicious. Also the African Pnut soups and Asian Pnut sauce GadoGado { great on grilled meat}
    Victor Johanson


    Joined: Oct 18, 2011
    Posts: 266
    Location: Fairbanks, Alaska
        
      10
    wayne stephen wrote:Atypical American uses for Peanut Butter...


    My late father regularly ate peanut butter and mayonnaise sandwiches, a combination of his own devising. I have yet to go there, but I've gravitated to other unconventional foods, like...

    Jellied Moose Nose!

    Here's a recipe:

    http://bertc.com/subfive/recipes/jelliednose.htm

    And here's the result. The aspic was so stiff it would bounce, and I was able to slice it wafer thin:




    [noseloaf.jpg]


    [moosetongue.jpg]


    [nosestew.jpg]


    Vic Johanson

    "I must Create a System, or be enslaved by another Man's"--William Blake
    Peony Jay


    Joined: Mar 24, 2012
    Posts: 145
    Location: B.C.
    Fiddleheads!!!
    Just cook them for 10 minutes and 'sauce' with garlicy butter. Mmmmm!
    How to find and identify them.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a2yEdUkx8UQ

    Morel mushrooms.
    How to 'hunt' for them.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aNh_RC5rSm4



    My Marxist Feminist Dialectic Brings All The Boys To The Yard!
    Varina Lakewood


    Joined: May 15, 2012
    Posts: 116
    Location: Colorado
        
        1
    I came up with this one because I'm allergic to potatoes and I missed eating potato salad. Also have trouble with eggs and dairy. If eggs or dairy don't bother you, mayo or sourcream can be used instead of coconut milk and cumin.

    Rice "Potato" Salad
    Rice-about the amount you want to eat
    coconut milk-enough to act as mayo
    cumin-just a little, to turn the flavor of the coconut milk from sweet to savory
    garlic powder-to taste
    onion powder-to taste
    salt-to taste
    other seasonings-entirely optional
    pickles-to taste; optional
    olives-optional
     
    permaculture playing cards
     
    subject: unusual foods that you have come up with
     
    cast iron skillet 49er

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