We are giving away four copies of Dan Chiras' book The Natural Plaster Book.
Dan will be answering your questions in the finishes forum Monday through Friday!
See this thread for details
Permies likes homestead and the farmer likes Homeschool roll call permies
  Search | Permaculture Wiki | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login


(the sound is wonky for the first 20 seconds)

daily-ish email

micro heaters

rocket mass heater

wofati

permies » forums » homesteading » homestead
Bookmark "Homeschool roll call" Watch "Homeschool roll call" New topic
Author

Homeschool roll call

Burra Maluca
Mother Tree

Joined: Apr 03, 2010
Posts: 3935
Location: Portugal Zone 9 Mediterranean Climate
    
130
I suspect there might be quite a few home-schoolers out there so I'm starting this thread so we can get to know each other a bit.

I'm near the end of my home-school journey as my son is 16 and in his last year of compulsory education. I'm a bit redundant now as he's started studying with the Open University and although I'm supposed to monitor and support him he doesn't really need much input from me any more. He also spends most afternoons on the farm, helping us build things and dig things and plant things, and playing with his ducks and the donkeys.

So who else out there is home-schooling or thinking of trying it?


What is a Mother Tree ?
Walter Jeffries


Joined: Nov 21, 2010
Posts: 890
    
  17
Bravo to you for homeschooling your son. We have homeschooled all of our children and it has been a wonderful experience. We also farm and that too is a part of learning. Our oldest is now 19, almost 20. He 'officially' stopped schooling (having to report to the state) when he was 16. At that point he was doing college level material. He continues to do homeschooling. It is a part of living.

Cheers

-Walter
Sugar Mountain Farm
Pastured Pigs, Sheep & Kids
in the mountains of Vermont
Read about our on-farm butcher shop project:
http://SugarMtnFarm.com/butchershop
http://SugarMtnFarm.com/csa
David Goodman
volunteer

Joined: Dec 14, 2011
Posts: 319
Location: Zone 9a/8b
    
  12
I was homeschooled from 1st grade through high school, then got the second highest GED score in the state the year I took it.

Now my wife (she was public schooled and hated it) and I are homeschooling our kids. Though we both came from the city, now we've got chickens, lots of fruit trees, organic gardens and some dairy goats... and those assets are all part of educating our kids.

If you care about your kids and aren't head-over-heels in debt that requires you to slave away for the banks, homeschooling is definitely the best option. My education was phenomenal, and so is that of my kids thus far.

(And... here's to you, homeschooling moms. You rock.)




Permaculture, bio-accumulators, rare plants, tool reviews and lots and lots of gardening inspiration - a new post every day: http://www.floridasurvivalgardening.com
Isaac Hill
volunteer

Joined: Feb 28, 2011
Posts: 343
Location: Beaver County, Pennsylvania (~ zone 6)
    
    2
I was homeschooled until high school, went to college, now I'm homeschooling myself! haha

My 6 year old sister is/will be homeschooled too, maybe more "unschool."


"To oppose something is to maintain it" -- Ursula LeGuin
Fred Morgan
steward

Joined: Sep 29, 2009
Posts: 960
Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
    
  11
We home schooled our kids part of the time. Our daughter went back to public school for high school because she was heading into hard science. Being so far ahead, she took a lot of AP courses and entered into WPI with sophomore standing at age 17, last year she finished her Phd in Physics.


Sustainable Plantations and Agroforestry in Costa Rica
Alison Thomas
volunteer

Joined: Jul 22, 2009
Posts: 933
Location: France
    
    5
Yep we're there too. 3 boys aged 8, 6 and 3. It has its challenges but we wouldn't have it any other way (although they'll always be free to choose school if they want). We're on a farm too and they amaze (and shock!!) their relatives/friends with the things they know, especially about reproduction! They are just so matter-of-fact about things that it makes me laugh.
Walter Jeffries


Joined: Nov 21, 2010
Posts: 890
    
  17
You don't have to go to public high school to get into the hard sciences. Colleges have come to recognize that homeschooled kids are typically far better than public school and want the homeschoolers. We do hard core research here on our farm all the time including genetics, mathematics, physics, engineering, biology and a lot more. Go for it.
Fred Morgan
steward

Joined: Sep 29, 2009
Posts: 960
Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
    
  11
Walter Jeffries wrote:You don't have to go to public high school to get into the hard sciences. Colleges have come to recognize that homeschooled kids are typically far better than public school and want the homeschoolers. We do hard core research here on our farm all the time including genetics, mathematics, physics, engineering, biology and a lot more. Go for it.


No you don't, but our son had a difficult time with the Marines of all places. The government seems to be less than thrilled with home schooling, so if you do the last year in a public school, you then have the fancy paper that they like.
Kay Bee


Joined: Oct 10, 2009
Posts: 471
Location: Jackson County, OR (Zone 7)
Our 3 boys (12, 8 and 4 years old) are all homechooled. We love it and hope the kids don't decide they want to attend public school, but we're willing to work with their interests. There are several large homeschool groups in our area and many small, special interest groups. Makes it easy for get-togethers and organizing larger events.


"Limitation is the mother of good management", Michael Evanari

Location: Southwestern Oregon (Jackson County), Zone 7
Tim Southwell


Joined: Nov 07, 2011
Posts: 78
Location: Hamilton, MT
I was pleased to see this forum open up. We are venturing into homeschooling this fall. Presently our oldest goes to one of the finest private schools in the country, but we just don't believe this is the best any more. Our oldest boy, now 6, will be starting up 1st grade schooling this fall. My wife, the educator, will lead the charge whilst back in Montana on a farm property that I will roll out Permaculture design principals from zones 0-5. I'll be interested to hear some educational experiences from the farm that you found were excellent in driving a lesson home. Thanks


Tim Southwell

www.facebook.com/abcacres
Julie Helms


Joined: Dec 06, 2011
Posts: 110
Location: SC Pennsylvania, Zone 6b
I homeschooled for 11 years, then we did some cyber school for AP classes. I have two daughters 16 and 18. The 18 year old is in college now. I also own a homeschool curriculum consignment shop--since 1998-- which gives me the benefit of knowing hundreds of homeschool families in my area. We have about 700 families registered in the local homeschool groups and yet I think only about half join these groups so the actual numbers are much higher.


Alison Freeth-Thomas wrote: We're on a farm too and they amaze (and shock!!) their relatives/friends with the things they know, especially about reproduction! They are just so matter-of-fact about things that it makes me laugh.


Same with us. I remember an incident where my daughter was about 8 and got talking with another family. Somehow the topic came up of someone trying to molest another (a story from the Bible), and my daughter pipes up with, "I think she wanted to mate with him". It was just hysterical in context. But that was all her training with our goats, sheep and chickens showing through!


http://woolyacres.wordpress.com/
Tim Southwell


Joined: Nov 07, 2011
Posts: 78
Location: Hamilton, MT
Tell me more about the consignment shop, what made you open it and how did it benefit your own HS efforts?
Julie Helms


Joined: Dec 06, 2011
Posts: 110
Location: SC Pennsylvania, Zone 6b
Tim Southwell wrote:Tell me more about the consignment shop, what made you open it and how did it benefit your own HS efforts?



I opened it because of frustration at not being able to see curriculum before ordering it-- at the time my choices were ordering from the internet or wait for the annual fair. There was also a hs business that traveled from area to area rebuying people's books they were done with for an insulting price--just pennies a piece. So I wanted a local place where people could get a reasonable return on their used books.

My children were guinea pigs. I tried out just about every new thing on the market with them. They loved the variety and I got to know the ins and outs, ups and downs for everything I sold. Personal benefits include all free curriculum for our homeschool and access to just about everything.


Here is an article I wrote on my business model: http://www.helium.com/items/1274711-how-to-operate-a-homeschool-curriculum-business
I don't have a website, but I have a blog for the store. You can see the types of things we sell etc. http://pacurriculumexchange.com/

I would love to help other people set up stores in other parts of the country. I have cross-country customers because nothing exists in their states like this. There is a serious need for this kind of store in many areas.
Ernie Wisner
volunteer

Joined: Oct 16, 2009
Posts: 788
Location: Tonasket washington
    
  23
while we dont have kids we teach home school and work with TOPS learning systems; we are working on some biology and life sciences modules to add to the list.


Need more info?
Ernie and Erica
Wood burning stoves, Rocket Mass Heaters, DIY,
Stove plans, Boat plans, General permiculture information, Arts and crafts, Fire science, Find it at www.ernieanderica.info


Julie Helms


Joined: Dec 06, 2011
Posts: 110
Location: SC Pennsylvania, Zone 6b
TOPS is great. The total hands-on approach is wonderful for kids who can't absorb much from sitting in front of a text book. One of my daughters had near zero retention of what she read in her science books. She needed to process all of her science through her hands in order to learn it. TOPS saved us on that front!

The only problem is most homeschoolers have never heard of it. They need to market it more aggressively/effectively in the homeschool market.
Ernie Wisner
volunteer

Joined: Oct 16, 2009
Posts: 788
Location: Tonasket washington
    
  23
Well thats true but they and we dont have much of a budget for marketing. Ron's idea was to let the system market it self and that worked in the past now we need to do a bit more.
I am so glad to hear that your doughtier learned this way. I learn with my hands as well so we work really hard to make experiments that use the hand and heads, if we can we include the noses, eyes, ears, and taste buds. everyone has different learning styles that will allow them to excel it's an educators job to find it.
Tim Southwell


Joined: Nov 07, 2011
Posts: 78
Location: Hamilton, MT
Thanks for the store reasoning and overview. What a wonderful way to develop friendships in the valley while aiding your fellow citizens. The article was a good read, though I wish to try my hand at a full blown Permaculture farm that running a store. It is all very helpful.

Love the TOPS website. My boy is certainly hands-on, so this will be a serious consideration as we get closer to settling in on a curriculum to secure by first of summer for implementation this fall.

Marianne West


Joined: Jan 05, 2012
Posts: 89
Location: Lemon Grove, CA
    
    1
We home schooled - until a divorce. My oldest pretty much home/unschooled inspired by John Holt all his school years. He went for a short while into a public school homeschool program (he wanted to go to 6 grade camp), and for a short while to an alternative Highschool- 2 days in class, rest at home. Now, he is 29 and the award winning head brewer of a micro brewery. he followed his bliss.
My daughter home schooled until high school, went to the same alternative school, on to University. Graduated sums cum laude.
My youngest went to school in 3rd grade, on to a regular High school and hated it. I am sure he was depressed. Now, he works, saves all his money and builds skate parks in his back yard and sometimes under bridges and such until they get kicked out.
I loved homeschooling my kids (hated school for myself) and am for sure a lifelong learner.

http://www.yogaforallpeople.com/
Katy Whitby-last


Joined: Apr 18, 2011
Posts: 130
Location: Scotland
I'm home educating my 2 boys (4 and 1) so we are just starting out on our home education journey. I've taken a lot of inspiration from John Holt's work and hope to rein in my teacher tendencies (I was an academic for 20 years).
Carolina Hecht-Nielsen


Joined: Feb 23, 2012
Posts: 5
Location: Escondido, Southern California
We filed as a private school this year ( an option in CA). I have 2 daughters almost 7 and 5 years old. John Holt, relaxed, unschooling is what we do right now.
I also have a 22 year old in college and a 17 year old in public school ( never homeschooled), and completely support and encourage our decision to homeschool their sisters.
Playing, exploring, growing, planting, observing, learning all the time,
Carolina
Alison Thomas
volunteer

Joined: Jul 22, 2009
Posts: 933
Location: France
    
    5
It's great to hear everyone's stories - and enthusiasm

Does anyone have any experience of it getting 'harder' as they get older in terms of Other People? We're finding that Other People don't seem to mind so much when the children are little but as our oldest is getting bigger (8 now) we are coming in for more criticism. It doesn't bother me but it bothers my husband. Maybe it's because our 8 year old still isn't reading (though I suspect he can but won't demonstarte the skill publicly until he feels almost perfect).
richard valley


Joined: Aug 18, 2011
Posts: 195
Location: Sierra Nevada mountain valley CA, & Nevada high desert
We school our children with School of Distance Education Brisbane an Australian school.
Nicholas Green


Joined: Nov 06, 2011
Posts: 27
My wife and I live in an urban area and plan on homeschooling our young children up through high school. We are hoping to move to a rural area before they are school age.

Our reasons are the same with all the previous replies; accelerated learning, self-teaching, exploring, 'unschooling', etc.

We all hope our children will come out brilliant, but we are also think homeschooling is a great option in case our kid turns out to be below average, or even severely special needs.
Not everyone has to go to university.
IF one of our children happens to be low on the intelligence curve his/her needs can be met with special attention instead of documented failures, ostracism, and bullying.
Having worked in special education, I know special needs children achieve ++% of their successes within home and family interactions.

The educational system in the US up to age 8 or so is glorified babysitting anyways.
richard valley


Joined: Aug 18, 2011
Posts: 195
Location: Sierra Nevada mountain valley CA, & Nevada high desert
It is not just how poorly but what they plan to teach.
John Polk
steward

Joined: Feb 20, 2011
Posts: 5819
Location: Moving to: NE Washington USDA zone 5 Western steppes to the Rockies
    
  86
If you want a good critique of the public school system, read this teacher's view:

http://www.newciv.org/whole/schoolteacher.txt

It's a real eye-opener!

Stacy Zoozwick


Joined: Dec 15, 2011
Posts: 74
Blessings I have two girls, ages 12 and 3. I have only been homeschooling for 2 years and love it! We took our doughter out after she was continually attacked and mocked by other children for being a Christian, yes that happens in America. We tried a number of time going to principals and school board. It's seems they had more concern for the kids doing it then my daughter. Also my husband and I had it with the early sex education and unapropriet books she brought home. US public schools are making lil zombies that don’t think for them self.

I just wish we would have done it sooner! She is not thriving and has many friends she sees at least 3 times a week. My precious 3 year old will never see the inside of a school room.
My girls now learn a more brod spectrum of things than they ever would in that classroom. Plus they get to learn what it like to actually work and not sit on the behinds all day. Good chores in the morning and evening keep children humble and respectful.
richard valley


Joined: Aug 18, 2011
Posts: 195
Location: Sierra Nevada mountain valley CA, & Nevada high desert
John, I'll have to read that again, not sure is says it all, glad you posted it.
Stacy, You have a lot of work ahead of you, our childern, the oldest is14 have never attended public school.
The best to you and yours. Richard
Sage Boyd


Joined: Mar 15, 2012
Posts: 16
Hi all.
I'm new here, tho not new to a permie-directed lifestyle. We have two small boys 4 and 20 mo and have been homeschooling from the start. nice to know others are here.
-Sage


Most bad government has grown out of too much government.-Thomas Jefferson
Sage Boyd


Joined: Mar 15, 2012
Posts: 16
Hi everyone,
I am glad to see so many people here. I like to see that people *have* reasons for wanting to go the route of homeschooling. Though, I see a lot of responses with a Christian/"Young Earth" focus. I wonder if there are also unschoolers? People that teach evolution/creationism/intelligent design all as theories? Anyone Pagan? Atheistic? Universalist? Just sustainable/permiculture focused? I am wondering how mixed the population is, more than anything.

As for us, we are working on Kindergarten skills right now. Cutting, drawing, letter sounds and number recognition. Anyone else doing pre-school at home?
-S
richard valley


Joined: Aug 18, 2011
Posts: 195
Location: Sierra Nevada mountain valley CA, & Nevada high desert
No, don't fret Atheist Paganism is in our schools, movies and on TV.
Sage Boyd


Joined: Mar 15, 2012
Posts: 16
Our house has an Athiest, a Pagan, a Buddhist and a Christian all living in harmony and acceptance. I only hope to find as much love and acceptance in other homes (not to mention forums.)

Is this a safe place for homeschooling discussion? Or, is it a place to mock and judge people for what they believe/teach? For me, Mocking and judging happen well enough outside our home (and especially in public schools) which is one of our many reasons for choosing the route of homeschooling. I hope that's not the case here, since I really like finding new sources for tools and learning resources, as well as sharing the many i find to be useful.

I hope to find friends here. Let me know if you're out there.
Cam Mitchell


Joined: Sep 18, 2011
Posts: 40
Location: Western Colorado, high desert, Zone 6A, 9" rain, 6500'
We homeschool our 5 kids with various methods. Some more stuctured, some less, some Charlotte Mason, some PACE, some unschooling. Kind of what works for each kid. Which would never be possible in the public school system.
And don't get me started on the "No Child Left Behind" nonsense. Bad implementation of trying to help the students who aren't doing well. A factory isn't designed for custom design and building.
I'd like to get our kids on a farm before they get much older. In some ways, I think that kind of learning is more important than rote abstract concepts.
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree

Joined: Apr 03, 2010
Posts: 3935
Location: Portugal Zone 9 Mediterranean Climate
    
130
Sage Boyd wrote:Is this a safe place for homeschooling discussion? Or, is it a place to mock and judge people for what they believe/teach? For me, Mocking and judging happen well enough outside our home (and especially in public schools) which is one of our many reasons for choosing the route of homeschooling. I hope that's not the case here, since I really like finding new sources for tools and learning resources, as well as sharing the many i find to be useful.


I want to point out that the only real rule here is 'be nice'. Any post that doesn't fit with the 'be nice' policy is likely to get itself deleted. There is no place here for mocking, judging, making sweeping statements about 'truth' or 'facts', or belittling anyone else's belief systems. This is not the right forum for discussing politics or religion, but I'll do whatever I can to ensure that this a safe place for discussing homeschooling.
richard valley


Joined: Aug 18, 2011
Posts: 195
Location: Sierra Nevada mountain valley CA, & Nevada high desert
Rehovoth, You have that right: Gettings the kids on the farm. Our kids have a life they love. They have horses, goats, chickens, ducks, birds, a dog. They drive aroung, at the lower ranch, on tractors, one tractor each or run with the horses, ponying them, to get the animals some excercize. They milk, feed, water, muck, deliver the young, when nessary and are each other's, and our, best friend.
For Christmas they made me a firewood rack and a gun rack. Well, what I mean is: everything that is fun and exciting is here, not off somewhere.




Sage Boyd


Joined: Mar 15, 2012
Posts: 16
Burra Maluca wrote: I want to point out that the only real rule here is 'be nice'. Any post that doesn't fit with the 'be nice' policy is likely to get itself deleted. There is no place here for mocking, judging, making sweeping statements about 'truth' or 'facts', or belittling anyone else's belief systems. This is not the right forum for discussing politics or religion, but I'll do whatever I can to ensure that this a safe place for discussing homeschooling.


Oh good, I was a little nervous. I am happy to know there *are* rules about being nice. I guess population statistics don't really fit into "homeschooling" discussion, so I'll leave that for another thread. Anyone homeschooling preschoolers?
Kellic kelwen


Joined: Jan 11, 2011
Posts: 27
Location: Northwestern Ohio, US
Honestly, I would have been very annoyed to have my mother hover over me all day instead of out working. I really think for some families its best to have parents outside the homes and kids going to school somewhere else. Perhaps an online school would be a better option.


"All this worldly wisdom was once the unamiable heresy of some wise man." Henry David Thoreau
Victoria Kelley


Joined: Mar 25, 2012
Posts: 1
I Just found this site 2 days ago and very glad I did.
We put our sons into online homeschooling for the first time in the last school year. We are very glad that we did.
One of my sons having bully problems and being constantly picked on.
My other son was having emotional issues as he is highly intelligent and cannot always handle the other kids.
Then there were the meetings with the school team.

The results after being home schooled for nearly a year:
The boys are thriving! They have never been this healthy either I might add. We haven't had a cough or stomach bug in our home for nearly a year now.
The younger son has settled down and is more interactive with people now.
My eldest has gained a sense of self importance not having to deal with looking over his shoulder all the time.

Best of all their grades have improved immensely! It has been a very positive experience for both of the children.
They have made a deeper connection to the earth as well.
They have taken an interest in learning Aquaponics, which I am an avid supporter of.


Nice to meet you all

Victoria



john giroux


Joined: Feb 17, 2011
Posts: 101
Location: Gainesville, GA
    
    3
I've got 2 kids that have been home schooled from the start. Taking responsibility for your kids education goes hand in hand with what I think permiculture is all about. I think of my kids education as the most important "guild" in my system. Glad to see there are others that think the same.
 
I agree. Here's the link: food forest dvd
 
subject: Homeschool roll call
 
Similar Threads
Article i saw: "Natural Farming - Inspiring passionate stewards"
Opinions on homesteading with an only child...
Beehive Fence to keep Elephants out
Farmers, Friends, and Tough Questions
Cob Durability - Case Study in cool, damp winters. Victoria B.C.
cast iron skillet 49er

more from paul wheaton's glorious empire of web junk: cast iron skillet diatomaceous earth sepp holzer raised garden beds raising chickens lawn care flea control missoula electric heaters permaculture videos permaculture books