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Garden picture exchange!

John Redman


Joined: Jan 24, 2011
Posts: 196
Location: Perkinston Mississippi zone 9a
    
  23
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Matu Collins
steward

Joined: Feb 24, 2011
Posts: 1357
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
    
  47
So beautiful! I love this thread. This is a photo of the fruit of a solanacea type volunteer that is abundant this year in part of my garden. It very closely resembles husk cherry but I'm not sure.

Pretty though.



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Kristie Wheaton


Joined: Jul 05, 2013
Posts: 1184
    
  28
Paul Redmond wrote:.


love your pics! I miss my flower gardens!
kelly vogel


Joined: Aug 27, 2013
Posts: 1
Location: Western US
New to permies. Thanks for all the great pics. Here is my first contribution. Even though my soil was horrible (long story) in theses beds I did get the Opalka tomatoes and Red Marconi peppers to produce nicely... not so much for my other tomatoes and peppers.



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"When government fears the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny."
Gordon Harris


Joined: Aug 27, 2013
Posts: 6
Love this thread because I love pictures! They give me so many ideas. BTW, to the Meyers family: you said more could be found on your blog, but when I went there, I was denied access. Seems one has to be invited to read it. Could I please get an invitation? Thanks!

-Gordon Harris (Vancouver Island)
Alex Ames


Joined: Feb 24, 2012
Posts: 348
    
    1
This thread goes to sleep sometimes and as much as people seem to enjoy it we
need to keep it going!


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Brian Vagg


Joined: Oct 04, 2012
Posts: 28
Location: Northern California - Zone 9b
I love the fall harvest. Below is a picture of this Sunday's goods. 52 pounds of tomatoes. Still working on canning it all. There is nothing finer than enjoying the fruits of your labor. Enjoy!



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Alex Ames


Joined: Feb 24, 2012
Posts: 348
    
    1
That is what it is all about! No brag just fact.
Florian Kogseder


Joined: Oct 12, 2013
Posts: 37
Location: Austria, Central Europe, USDA-Zone 6b
    
  11
nice thread, and some really nice gardens you have there

I thought this might be a good place for me to introduce myself and show you some of what I did the last year

I'm from Austria, Central Europe, and have a Garden of about 1800m² in which I am growing lots of different vegetables, mushrooms, herbs, fruits and berries

But enough for the talk, here are some pictures from my garden



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Florian Kogseder


Joined: Oct 12, 2013
Posts: 37
Location: Austria, Central Europe, USDA-Zone 6b
    
  11
and some more...


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Leila Rich
steward

Joined: May 24, 2010
Posts: 3613
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
    
  71
Welcome to permies Florian, your garden is lovely
What kind of fungi are they? I'm especially fascinated by the white blob hugging the tree!
Florian Kogseder


Joined: Oct 12, 2013
Posts: 37
Location: Austria, Central Europe, USDA-Zone 6b
    
  11
Leila Rich wrote:Welcome to permies Florian, your garden is lovely
What kind of fungi are they? I'm especially fascinated by the white blob hugging the tree!


thanks

The white mushroom is Hericium erinaceus (the Lion's Mane Mushroom), the brown ones are Pholiota nameko. Both of these are cultivated species in eastern Asia and amongst the most popular edible mushrooms there.
Julia Franke


Joined: Apr 04, 2013
Posts: 38
Location: Berks County, PA
    
    2
Myers Family wrote:http://ourcascadia.blogspot.com/

it is made using alder saplings... not willow. we had a few thousand of them to clear so we put them to use.

-bill

Patrick Mann wrote:
Myers Family wrote:Full pics/details can be found on our blog...Hope you enjoy!

-Bill, Melissa & Paige


Please post a link to your blog. I'd love to see more of the willow structures.


I would love to look at your blog as your pictures are so gorgeous and intriguing, but I got a message that the blog is only open to invited readers. Is your blog now private?


My blog: http://simplicityforjulia.com/
Kristaps Vinogulajs


Joined: Jun 01, 2012
Posts: 17
Location: Latvia
    
    1
Our raised bed at the root cellar's south wall(cabbage,onions,tomatoes etc.), the concrete wall is accumulating heat, releasing it in cold nights:


Peas bed:


Potatoes harvest:


Experimental round bed with zucchinni, pumkins, beans and corn:


And our chicken tractor:




Renee Belisle


Joined: Jul 23, 2013
Posts: 4
Location: geraldton, ontario
Geraldton, Ontario Canada Zone 1b



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Guarren cito


Joined: Aug 24, 2012
Posts: 77
Location: Zone 4A
    
    1
Guys, this is proof:

I planted a bunch of corn and didn't water any of it. I planted one batch at the same time, and a month later another batch (you can see tiny plants).

You can clearly see four corn plants on the left from the first batch compared to the rest of the first batch.

All large corn plants in this pic were planted at the same time. The hugel corn matured literally more than a month before the regular corn and grew to be waaaaay bigger in height, diameter, leaf size and corn size.

Remember, all unwatered.


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Irene Kightley
pollinator

Joined: Apr 13, 2009
Posts: 335
Location: South West France
    
  15
Hailstone damaged tomatoes doing OK



First time growing Kiwano



Great crops of Ceps (Boletus edulis) in the woods (30 kilos so far !)



loofahs, cabbages, beans, kiwano, cannas, Cardiospermum halicacabum, amaranthus, parsley etc.



Cauliflowers starting to produce curds



La Ferme de Sourrou : Nos projets avec PHOTOS
Alex Ames


Joined: Feb 24, 2012
Posts: 348
    
    1
Irene what variety of tomato is that with it's pointy
bottom?

It is always great to see what is growing in France!
Irene Kightley
pollinator

Joined: Apr 13, 2009
Posts: 335
Location: South West France
    
  15
They're Beefheart tomatoes although in France we call them Cœur-de-bœuf (Heart of ox).

They grow very tall so take up little room on the potager and they taste really delicious.
David Livingston
pollinator

Joined: Apr 24, 2013
Posts: 755
Location: Anjou ,France
    
  22
I am a big fan of the cour de boef too
Here are some pic of my allotment and harvest at the moment in Angers France

https://picasaweb.google.com/loiseau.laurence.laurence37/RecolteCourges2013?authkey=Gv1sRgCL-mxb-E0oGqvwE#


Living in Anjou , France
Irene Kightley
pollinator

Joined: Apr 13, 2009
Posts: 335
Location: South West France
    
  15
Great photos David, I especially like this one :



(You may know this but I'll say it anyway for anyone who doesn't. To put a photo from Picasa into the forum right click on the photo with your mouse then click on "copy the address of the image" go back to the posting box in the forum, click on the Img tab at the top, then click ctrl/v to put the url into the space. When you submit your post the photo should appear.)
Alex Ames


Joined: Feb 24, 2012
Posts: 348
    
    1
Irene what do you know about growing Tarbais beans? I have been
asked to grow some by a cousin in New Orleans. She loves them but
thinks the humidity down there is causing hers to drop their blossoms.
Brad Cloutier


Joined: Aug 31, 2013
Posts: 31
well you guys all have me blown away but I'm a newbie at this so I'll ride that excuse for a while . Here's a few things I have going on



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Elle Grisham


Joined: Nov 07, 2013
Posts: 5
Location: zone 9b
Love this thread!

We have 3 hugelkultur in our little slice of zone 9b, 2 sheet mulched patio bed and 2 soon to be planted herb spirals....




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David Dakota


Joined: Oct 25, 2013
Posts: 16
Location: Currently eastern coast of Florida/zone 10a
WOW! All these gardens are so beautiful. This is my first year gardening and it is going so-so. I hope to learn much from this forum and one day post more beautiful garden pics of my own. Keep it up all.
Irene Kightley
pollinator

Joined: Apr 13, 2009
Posts: 335
Location: South West France
    
  15
Alex,

"Irene what do you know about growing Tarbais beans?"

Sorry I missed this, I've just come back from a visit to the UK.

I've never grown Tarbais beans but from what I know, they are a bean created specifically for the Tarbes region in southern France - so it may indeed be a humidity problem.
Alex Ames


Joined: Feb 24, 2012
Posts: 348
    
    1
Irene, my cousin had some Tarbais beans in a cassoulet at a restaurant in New York
and set out to grow them. She failed and now it is my turn and I don't like my chances.
They are extremely expensive due to them only coming from Tarbes I guess.

Some of the seeds she sent me were the few that she was able to grow and they are
20% larger than the seeds she grew them from and are more yellow in color. I am going to
have a go at it and see what I get.

Please post some more of your beautiful pictures.
David Goodman
volunteer

Joined: Dec 14, 2011
Posts: 325
Location: Zone 9a/8b
    
  13
Here's a few from the garden right now:



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Permaculture, bio-accumulators, rare plants, tool reviews and lots and lots of gardening inspiration - a new post every day: http://www.floridasurvivalgardening.com
Alex Ames


Joined: Feb 24, 2012
Posts: 348
    
    1
David, the Mexican Sunflowers appear to be quite tall kind of like the ones I grew a couple of years ago. I estimate the top
of my gate at left in the picture to be 7 ft. high. The picture doesn't do justice to how tall this plant got. The blooms on this variety
were orange and yours appear to be yellow.


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David Goodman
volunteer

Joined: Dec 14, 2011
Posts: 325
Location: Zone 9a/8b
    
  13
Yours look great. Mine is a perennial cousin - I think you have Tithonia rotundifolia. Mine are diversifolia.

Here are more shots and a little write-up I did a couple of days ago:

http://www.floridasurvivalgardening.com/2013/11/meet-amazing-giant-sunflower-that-fixes.html

I love both types... they bring in every pollinator on the block, plus they create lots and lots of biomass to feed the food forest.
Alex Ames


Joined: Feb 24, 2012
Posts: 348
    
    1
David I don't have room for them in my current situation due to deer pressure
outside my fencing. I just need to bite the bullet and fence in more area. Although, I kind of
like the deer being around. I wonder if they like the perennial Mexican sunflowers
as well as they do the annual ones. Do you have this to deal with?
David Goodman
volunteer

Joined: Dec 14, 2011
Posts: 325
Location: Zone 9a/8b
    
  13
@Alex

The deer probably love them. We don't have a problem with them in my neighborhood, but I have a friend who's seen his fledgling food forest chewed to bits.

Fences are a good idea - I'd really miss the Tithonias if I had to live without them. They're my comfrey.



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Tracy Lee


Joined: Sep 09, 2012
Posts: 27
Location: NW Arkansas
Recently moved to somewhere that has rocks so this herb spiral is the first thing i have made out of rock. The raised garden beds with the log sides have 2 ft of hugelculture underground under these beds with old hay, compost, dirt and leaves piled on top filling up the logs.


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Leila Rich
steward

Joined: May 24, 2010
Posts: 3613
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
    
  71
Winter hugel after adding amendments
Hugel today
A bed I'm leaving over the summer for the insects Florence fennel, chicory, radish, carrots etc.
The poles against the fence are for my runner beans, which are running rather late this season for some reason...
Josh Pasholk


Joined: Jun 06, 2013
Posts: 69
Location: Southern California
    
    5
Just made this the other day.

Hugelkultur with an unglazed clay pot burried for irrigation.


Here is my blogs post on it:

http://joshpasholk.tumblr.com/post/70166966280/urbanpermacultr-hugelkultur-i-finally-got


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