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Permies likes cooking and the farmer likes cooking duck permies
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cooking duck

Leah Sattler


Joined: Jun 26, 2008
Posts: 2603
I found it! a good method for cooking duck that is. I found a recipe that called for boiling the duck for 45-60 minutes before roasting it. It works perfectly. Most of the fat rendered off in the boiling so it wasn't a big hunk-o-grease when it was pulled from the oven. the only stupid thing I did was to season the water. The rendered fat in the water had the ginger taste and that made its uses limited. next time I will just boil it plain and season it heavily before roasting so that I will have someduck fat to use. supposed to be good for lots of stuff.

now the problem is that cute factor. we had several that I was going to butcher but my daughter didn't want to so we gave them away. well, to be honest I wasn't looking forward to butchering them either or I would have despite daughte,r or rather I wouldn't have asked her opinion.


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Susan Monroe


Joined: Sep 30, 2008
Posts: 1093
Location: Western WA
Use that seasoned grease as a fire starter, smear on junk mail.

Yes, the 'cute factor' is something I have issues with, too.  It probably wouldn't bother me to have to kill a person who needed it, but a cute little animal....

Sue
                                          


Joined: Jul 29, 2009
Posts: 8
Welcome to the world of tender duck!!  I used a similar recipe-except mine called for simmering the duck in a broth as opposed to just water. 

Another good method for cooking duck is to steam it, using a bain-marie (water bath).

Take a good pot or dutch oven and put the duck in it.  Don't worry about trying to cover the duck with the lid-leave it off.  Put both in a big roasting pan filled with water (the water should go 3/4 up the pot sides).  Note: don't use a disposable roasting pan-use a real one.  Cover the roasting pan with tin foil (get the super wide length tin foil): tenting to leave room above and around the pot and duck.  Cook over med-high heat for 2-3 hours (depending on desired tenderness), start timing once water has reached a boil.  My roasting pan is large enough to take two burners.  The idea to create a large steam bath for the duck.  Check occasionally to drain accumulated fat from pot and check water level in roasting pan.

Take duck out of water bath and pat dry.  Let it air dry for 2 hours.  Roast in an oven for 20-30 minutes at 500  F degrees .  This will give you that wonderful Chinese style crispy skin.  I let the duck cool and then carve it Chinese style (same as cutting for Garde-Manger).  I add a reduced sauce of stock and Hoisin sauce, drizzling the duck strips with it.

I normally stuff my duck with ginger and scallions and rub the cavity with Hoisin sauce before steaming it.  Since you are don't want flavored duck fat, you could always do a separate broth with ginger, to be added when duck is done.

There are other methods of steaming duck-namely tying it up over a pot or wok filled with boiling water.  My attempts with those methods were disastrous -name because my stock pot was not deep enough to accommodate a duck tied over it...and my knot tying skills leave something to be desired...  Don't let my experiences deter you though

Some recipes also have you crisp the skin by frying it in a wok as opposed to roasting it.  My preference is for the roasting method..but again that is just my preference!

I found that the boil method gave me a tender stew like quality to the meat whereas the steaming method gave me an equally tender but more compact (less stew like) meat...closer to what one gets with roast duck in a Chinese restaurant.

Thanks for sharing your recipe..please share more!!  It is fun to see another person experimenting with Duck recipes!
Leah Sattler


Joined: Jun 26, 2008
Posts: 2603
I want to try the steaming thing now. I would like to get a little closer to the 'roast' texture. I have a big 'ol goose in my freezer to try next. never had goose before but I am assuming it needs to be treated similiarly to duck.
Joel Hollingsworth
volunteer

Joined: Jul 01, 2009
Posts: 2103
Location: Oakland, CA
I think the ginger-flavored grease would be just fine in matzoh ball soup...maybe add some lemon or orange to the broth as well.  That sounds like just the thing for my cold. 

Don't forget to use "schmaltz" as a search term if you're googling for recipies.  Yiddish cuisine has all sorts of uses for duck fat.


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