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NE OK (Tulsa and surrounding areas)

 
Moni Dew
Posts: 33
Location: Broken Arrow OK USA
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Wondering how many of us have found the PERMIES! 

I just joined myself yesterday. 
 
                            
Posts: 3
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hello from arkansas,  this is my second post i'm a newbie,  lol    i was wondering if i was the only one around,    lol
 
                                  
Posts: 10
Location: Chautauqua County KS
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Excellent! I'm in Tulsa working while my land north of Sedan KS waits patiently for me...
 
ronie dee
Posts: 598
Location: Cosby MO
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I went thru Tulsa today. I think they will be done with construction on 44 ummmmm in the year 2525.
 
Moni Dew
Posts: 33
Location: Broken Arrow OK USA
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welcome, Oooharao!  Glad to meet another newbie!

Ronie!  You're so right!  Road construction takes ffffffffoooooooorrrrrrrreeeeevvvvvveeeeeeerrrrr here!  Oklahoma's infrastructure is downright humiliatingly bad!  I hope you had a safe and joyous journey while you were here, tho'.  Where were you traveling to on your way through?

And, Notomoro, where in Tulsa?  I'm in Broken Arrow.  I'd like to know more about establishing a food forest in these parts.  (Which trees are best, etc).
 
ronie dee
Posts: 598
Location: Cosby MO
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I was in Pryor and had to go to Sapulpa then to Kansas City.. I had to go west 44 clear thru Tulsa and the new 6 lane has been needed for a long time. In the year 2525 when, they get done with 6 lanes all the way thru, it will be fantastic.

It was not too bad this time - 14 mins all the way through to where 66(Mission) splits with 44 on the west side. The 45 mph area is not very long now and was better than it has been in a long time.  ...Now if they would just do something with 75 north..............


So do you have a little land in B.Arrow or how big food forest are you wanting?
 
Moni Dew
Posts: 33
Location: Broken Arrow OK USA
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Smiling here, at all you've said! 

As for land in Broken Arrow, I have nothing.  Just a small suburban lot with suburban home, the backyard of which holds my raised bed organic garden.  FWiW: Raised bed gardening is nearly the opposite of the entire food foresting concept.  I can't help feeling sometimes that the "compromise" was a giant step backwards.

Food foresting is a dream of mine.  I have been begging my husband/family for a small piece of land for nearly a decade, half an acre to 5 acres, on which to attempt this dream.  (And I would dearly love to include passive solar home design into my overall plans as well.)  It must be said however, that he/they do not share my vision.  They have difficulty appreciating my feeble attempts to explain such complex integrated systems. 

The concept of food foresting really rang true to me, from the moment I first heard of it.  I have purchased some books, watched some videos, etc, in an attempt to educate myself.  But I have no experience with it, none whatsoever.  Perhaps the universe delays because I am not yet ready.
 
ronie dee
Posts: 598
Location: Cosby MO
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I think the food forest is a good idea, but I have never studied it.  I grew up with parents that lived through the dust bowl and great depression - so I think that many of the ideas and even permaculture are not new - just given a new name. 

I think you are on the right track in looking into finding a little land and preparing a place to grow things. If the economy or any crazy world event makes it hard to use paper money to buy staples - then having a food forest, garden and a sack of beans might seem like a genius thing to have.

There may come a time when a person with an acre of land, some seeds and a few chickens, will be considered rich and a guy with a wheelbarrow full of cash - can't buy a dozen eggs.

If the economy picks up - having fresh home grown produce is still a fantastic money saving treat - and what better hobby or past time activity can provide so much good and potential and little to no bad side?

I tried raised garden beds a lot of years ago, but they dry out so quickly that they require lots of water and constant attention. I wouldn't return to the raised beds unless I had a lot more home time, an abundant water source, or poor soil that the raised beds would be easier than any other way to grow plants.
 
Moni Dew
Posts: 33
Location: Broken Arrow OK USA
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Wow, Ronie!  EXACTLY!

And yes, the raised beds were due to poor city-lot soil, to help with weed control, etc.  And they are 100% dependent upon constant maintenance!

Food foresting requires a natural water source (spring, stream, etc).  It's essentially emulating a natural rain forest, except that it's tilted toward food production.  So the leaf litter from above becomes the mulch for below.  The roots of the trees carry water from the stream to surrounding areas.  Vines are coaxed up tall trees.  Every layer has a purpose:  Canopy, understory, shrub, herbaceous, ground cover, root crops, viners - both horizontal and vertical.  All the waste/litter of the system goes back into the system.  The water is naturally deviated around the property as necessary to ensure survival of the water intensive crops, into shallow retaining ponds, etc.  When designed properly, it's entirely self-maintaining and will outlive you!  I love that idea!  Especially, if as you say, worse does come to worse.  More lives than my own may come to depend on it.  That's my chief motivation for wanting to implement it, as soon as possible. 

It's a fascinating system!  I just wish I understood its complexities a little bit more.   

 
ronie dee
Posts: 598
Location: Cosby MO
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Wow. It sounds like you know quite a lot about the food forest to me.  I just let nature run its course and try to coax an increase in some of the things I like best - like raspberries and stinging nettles.

They talk a lot on the permaculture forums about Hugeculture for moisture retention and to improve poor soils.. Where I live they recommend to NOT bury wood like that because of termites - so I'm not going to try it right now. If I build my next place out of materials that termites don't eat, I may try the hugeculture - folks around here swear by its benefits.
 
Moni Dew
Posts: 33
Location: Broken Arrow OK USA
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Yes, here in NE OK burying wood is out of the question.  We have massive termite issues!  But the idea of getting organic, water-retaining material into soil is not new!  Anything you have access to which achieves the end result is worth pursuing. You may have to do a little creative, out-of-the-box thinking.  But I'll bet you can find something that will work.

 
ronie dee
Posts: 598
Location: Cosby MO
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Yes, that's true. I bury last years compost in the spring - even if it's not completely composted into humus.  I never really thought abut it before, but I guess I could bury large dead weeds. Tree leaves buried might hold a lot of moisture..
 
                                  
Posts: 10
Location: Chautauqua County KS
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MoniDew
"And, Notomoro, where in Tulsa?  I'm in Broken Arrow.  I'd like to know more about establishing a food forest in these parts.  (Which trees are best, etc). "

I am in Owasso, having moved from Broken Arrow last summer. I'm still learning about food forests too, but like you, I am fascinated with the simplicity of it. I've got some land north of Sedan KS that I am working with, soon to move there in maybe 5 years. My food forest area will be about 1.5 acres. The land there now is very compacted with weak grasses and tons of lespedeza. I need to chisel plow it a few times to un-compact it, over plant a cover crop something like hairy vetch, soy beans and alfalfa, then plant trees. If I keep mowing the cover crop down and chisel plow a few more times I think the top soil will improve to help the bushes and perreniel veggies I'll put in. The forest site is on a slight hill so I plan on controlling water run off with hugelkulture berms. Lotta big plans and hard work but I am very excited about this!!!
 
Moni Dew
Posts: 33
Location: Broken Arrow OK USA
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I don't blame you, Notomoro!  That sounds very exciting!!  I'm so happy for you!
 
David Langston
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I live in Tulsa and am just getting started. I bought an acre in the NE section of urban Tulsa, 11th and S Mingo area. This is not ideal, but I am on my second year with a small raised bed garden and have been researching and experimenting. My knowledge is not vast yet, but I am willing to learn. Is there any planning for classes, or a meetup to exchange ideas?
 
Nathan Pickard
Posts: 18
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I live near downtown Tulsa in a large historic house in Brady Heights. We rent out some of the rooms and I was just thinking how great it would be to get some other people interested in permaculture to rent out rooms. We have purchased four lots around our house and are starting an edible food forest. Planted over 40 trees this winter and lots of other things. Just let me know if you know anyone who is interested in a place to stay and observe and learn from nature with us.
 
B Stein
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Hi! I work for a nonprofit in the Tulsa area and I'm looking to learn lots more about permaculture. I'm also looking for a new living situation, as my lease is about up and I'd like to move out of my apartment and into a shared space. If any of y'all are still looking for tenants - please let me know and I'll tell you more about myself. Thank you!
 
Nathan Pickard
Posts: 18
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We just had three TU students move out. They were living with us during their summer classes which just ended. So we now have 3 out of 5 renter rooms available. Would love to show you around and hear more about you. My email is Nathanpickard at gmail if you would prefer to email me more about yourself. Thanks.
 
Miriah Glenn
Posts: 12
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I live about half way between tulsa and okc. I learned gardening in north western missouri. Boy let me tell you I am having to pay serious attention to water retention methods. That and I have a massive amount of inedible weeds (us or the livestock). Oh...the clay drives me crazy! Lol On the other hand it has been beneficial for the cobwood. Any pointers on what fruit trees do well here?
 
Pa Kilter
Posts: 2
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We are located about an hour north of Tulsa. I recently tweeted about the fact I was looking for Okie Permies a while back and got lots of retweets and favorites but nobody actually replied. Then, low and behold I decided to look here at Permies.com and find this. Ma and I have been working for the last three years to get our permaculture on and I can tell you it is working in NEOK. You can check our progress on our blog page.

http://offkilteracres.com

 
J. Humphrey
Posts: 3
Location: Zone 7a
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After reading these forums for a while I figured I'd register so I can talk to my neighbors.

I work on an organic farm about an hour west of Tulsa. I am learning permaculture methods because I think traditional agriculture is ruining the land base. I have experimented with hugelbeds this year, several 2'ft high raised mounds/beds and one big mound 6'ft tall. I also use local wood chip mulch which I find conserves moisture well and enriches the soil quickly. I planted in March and April and didn't have to water until the second week in June but from then on irrigation was necessary. Right now I am enjoying the 2 inches of rain we just got. I am installing drip irrigation soon even with the hugelkulture and wood chips.

I'd like to talk about different methods okies use to get through the summer. I'd also be interested in helping out on projects in exchange for help whenever I need it.

B Stein, I'll soon have a political science degree and am interested in working for a non-profit. I don't know if my organic gardening experience can get me work but I'd like to know more.

Nathan, Let me know what projects you are doing and if you need any help. I enjoy Tulsa.
 
mick mclaughlin
Posts: 200
Location: Augusta,Ks
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Moni, you migjt read this thread and check out bio char.

http://www.permies.com/t/6398/permaculture/biochar-hugelkultur

I am starting hugel up here in south centrsl ks. I am not paticularly worried about termites. They can be in my hugel. They cant get in my house.
 
Brian Morsman
Posts: 8
Location: Ozarks
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To answer your original question, I'm a bit east of you, in Siloam Springs, AR.
Not too far from Tulsa, and I have lots of friends over there!
 
Jason Elliott
Posts: 5
Location: Sand Springs, OK
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I'm in the Sand Springs area. I'm interested in learning more about permaculture. I have 5 acres that I am going to work on.
 
Hildegard Bogart
Posts: 49
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SEK here! The soil is a bit challenging for sure. I am placing soaker hoses across the top/center of my hugle beds this year in the hopes that I NEVER need them ...but we need to be realistic , I suppose. I wanted to share this; there is an upcoming biochar workshop being offered in February in Independence , KS by David Yarrow . I attended one of his workshops 3 months ago. The test plots I saw were proof to me that we have a chance at repairing the soil. David has a website if you want to contact him.
 
Kelda Miller
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Hi all,

My family and I are in Fairland, OK, though we've only recently moved here from Washington State. We're always looking to meet like-minded allies, so stop on by! My contact info is on my website, but the website doesn't have much about what we're doing here... yet. It's still oriented to our work back home.
 
Zach Muller
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Pie
Posts: 754
Location: NE Oklahoma zone 7a
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bike books chicken dog forest garden urban
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Hey kelda, welcome to the area. If i am out in your direction ill drop you a line to come say hey. Hope everyones plants are growing happily here around Tulsa. My wife and i really wanted to get a historic house up in brady heights near you Nathan but it did not work out for our timing and price. We ended up near 31st and Yale area.

I think we are lucky with our easy growing climate. My brother in law has had good luck growing meyer lemons. Delicious crop this season. One of my favorite tree crops for the area is pecan. I have transplanted one that grew from seed onto the north side of my house, and have plans to move two more to the west side of the house. I looove pecans. Mulberries are a great frugal person fruit tree in this area, since i am one of those i have one mature mulberry and have allowed about 20 seedlings to come up. Goji berries are a good shrub that grows like a weed here ( if anyone is interested i will probably root some cuttings next season). Im experimenting with tree collards, have three cuttings rooting over winter and am going to try to insulate the one left in the ground. I think next season will be a season of tree collards in my garden, now that i have a good fullsun area for them to thrive.
Im using ground covers of red, white, crimson clovers, poppy, rye, peas, sorghum.
 
Grant Stacy
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I'm a kid in the area
 
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