Diatomaceous Earth bug killer*
Permies likes southern usa and the farmer likes Texas drought to last possibly 9 more years. permies
  Search | Permaculture Wiki | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies | World Domination!
Register / Login


permies » forums » regional » southern usa
Bookmark "Texas drought to last possibly 9 more years." Watch "Texas drought to last possibly 9 more years." New topic
Author

Texas drought to last possibly 9 more years.

Amedean Messan
pollinator

Joined: Nov 11, 2010
Posts: 821
Location: Burlington, NC - Woodland, Clay - Zone 7
    
  26
Link says it better than I can.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/44725170/ns/weather/


Those who hammer their swords into plows will plow for those who don't!
Tyler Ludens
pollinator

Joined: Jun 25, 2010
Posts: 5326
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
    
  20
Other climate info I've read seems to indicate this drought condition may be permanent due to climate change.  In any case, I'm going to plan accordingly. 

Bluh. 


Idle dreamer

Marissa Little


Joined: Jun 27, 2011
Posts: 63
Crikey. 

H Ludi Tyler wrote:
In any case, I'm going to plan accordingly. 


Does this involve a suitcase and a plane ticket?

Why exactly am I planning my new vegetable garden?  Sigh.


Marissa
Sand Holler Farm
Dale TX
Tyler Ludens
pollinator

Joined: Jun 25, 2010
Posts: 5326
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
    
  20
Marissa Little wrote:

Does this involve a suitcase and a plane ticket?


Sometimes I think seriously about running away!  But I have family in the region, and I have great sentimental attachment to the Hill Country, especially in the Fall.  Also, I'm not convinced the answer to our problems is to run away from them.  I like to think permaculture can help us "green the desert" or keep the green places from becoming desert.  At least many people seem to claim it can!  I just wonder if I have the guts to prove it here on my place.     I get so discouraged.  Pretty much everything I've planted has died except a few things right by the house where I've been watering.  Oh, some cactus, sotol and agave I planted haven't died!  (yet - though some of the native cactus in our fields are dying)

Margie Nieuwkerk


Joined: Aug 02, 2011
Posts: 47
Location: Bulgaria, Zone 7/8
You might like this!!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8gPvsl9ni-4

Don't give up hope.
Tyler Ludens
pollinator

Joined: Jun 25, 2010
Posts: 5326
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
    
  20
We got 3 1/2 inches in this last storm. 

Margie Nieuwkerk


Joined: Aug 02, 2011
Posts: 47
Location: Bulgaria, Zone 7/8
I'm soooo relieved for yu!!! 

Here's hoping more is on the way!
Tyler Ludens
pollinator

Joined: Jun 25, 2010
Posts: 5326
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
    
  20
We'd rather not have more right away - flooding wouldn't be so good. 

But the grass is starting to green again and little plants are popping up all around! 
Margie Nieuwkerk


Joined: Aug 02, 2011
Posts: 47
Location: Bulgaria, Zone 7/8
That's right, just the right amount, NO FLOODING, just nice night showers, while you sleep, and comfy days.
Tyler Ludens
pollinator

Joined: Jun 25, 2010
Posts: 5326
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
    
  20
Not very likely, given this is Texas - land of drought and flood. 
Jacob Nielson


Joined: Oct 31, 2011
Posts: 17
Location: Texas - Zone 8
I think the  "drought" is an opportunity or an excuse to implement some of the zero/near zero irrigation methods like Hugalkultur beds, polycultures, planting from seeds, planting hardy varieties, etc.  When the normal amount of water comes back whether in one year or 10 years, those systems I would expect would perform even better with the increased (normal) rain fall.
Tyler Ludens
pollinator

Joined: Jun 25, 2010
Posts: 5326
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
    
  20
I agree, Jacob.  Texas desperately needs to get its act together regarding water, and this is a good time for folks to be learning about rainwater harvesting.  Apparently some communities are having water seminars to help people learn more about rainwater harvesting.

On my own place, we're trying to install as many rain harvesting earthworks and buried wood beds as we can during this dry period. 

Jacob Nielson


Joined: Oct 31, 2011
Posts: 17
Location: Texas - Zone 8
Same here, our Hugel beds are doing really well for their first year. Rather than going up, I dug down about 4 feet and added about 1 foot  of soil over top.  I am looking forward to the next couple months and the hundreds of bags of leaves i can gather up just from my little street.

I work with a gal who spent nearly $300 a month this last summer to keep her lawn looking perfect.  I started to implement some of Paul's lawn care suggestions.  With just a year underway my lawn was nice and green all summer and I didn't spend anywhere near $300 a month in water for the same size lawn.

Over the winter I plan to install some water capture systems to make the most of the spring rains.  There are so many resources and methods out there to fit anybody's ability and property.  Avoiding paying $300 a month in water could easily pay for a lot of them.
Tyler Ludens
pollinator

Joined: Jun 25, 2010
Posts: 5326
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
    
  20
The electric co-op is coming down our road clearing trees from under the power lines, so we'll get literally tons of wood cut up and chipped for free.  I have big plans for all that material. 

Danielle Favor


Joined: Sep 24, 2011
Posts: 17
I'm considering a move to the Texas hill country (Fredericksburg or Boerne, perhaps) to be closer to grandchildren.  As a novice permaculturist, I'm concerned about drought conditions and whether or not they might be the new norm considering climate change.  I'm also wondering if there is an active permaculturist community in the area -- I'll need all the advice I can get!
Tyler Ludens
pollinator

Joined: Jun 25, 2010
Posts: 5326
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
    
  20
Texas and the Southwest are forecast to become drier with global warming, though this region may experience more intense flooding rainfall events as well.  This is already one of the flood capitols of the US.    Personally I think the weather here can be fascinating and exciting, but it can also be scary and inconvenient and it is definitely challenging to try to grow food here!

http://www.publicnewsservice.org/index.php?/content/article/21640-1

There seems to be a biggish permaculture community mostly centered in Austin, though I just joined a permaculture meetup group in San Antonio (I live closer to there than to Austin).  Fredericksburg hosts both an annual nature fair (in the Spring) and a renewable energy and green living fair (in the Fall).  Interest in sustainable living and food growing is definitely increasing in this area! 
jack spirko


Joined: Dec 28, 2010
Posts: 102
    
  36
When MSN tells you a long term trend on ANYTHING a sports team, the climate, the economy, the stock market, etc. BET AGAINST IT.
Tyler Ludens
pollinator

Joined: Jun 25, 2010
Posts: 5326
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
    
  20
I'd love for it to become mild and moist here, but I'm sure not going to bet on it. So far it looks better to bet on it swinging dramatically from drought to flood....
Nathan Wrzesinski


Joined: Jun 09, 2012
Posts: 75
Location: Austin Texas
9 years of drought is making me rethink my hugelkultur garden, I might need to raise it 6 feet as opposed to 3! gah lee thats alot of wood!

Project Upcycle is giving away a Solar Panel Kit on Facebook for every 100 likes! https://www.facebook.com/ProjectUpcycle
Check out our blog for info on how YOU can get into renewable energies using waste http://ProjectUpcycle.blogspot.com
 
 
subject: Texas drought to last possibly 9 more years.
 
cast iron skillet 49er

more from paul wheaton's glorious empire of web junk: cast iron skillet diatomaceous earth sepp holzer raised garden beds raising chickens lawn care flea control missoula electric heaters permaculture videos permaculture books