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Coprinus comatus?

 
                                  
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Please excuse a naive beginner but do these fungi look like Coprinus comatus? The are growing on the site of an old and long defunct Chinese Elm and the location is Toronto Canada - date is today September 29th.
Thanks
Mac
fungi2 small.jpg
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fungismall 1.jpg
[Thumbnail for fungismall 1.jpg]
 
                                  
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Just to let you know, I gobbled up the whole lot shown in the picture for dinner tonight - had them with a nice sauvignon blanc - and they were really tasty! I fried them in a little oil, and added soya sauce and some pan-browned garlic. The texture was slimy, the aroma was very mushroomy/garlicy and the taste was mostly from the soya sauce. If I survive I recommend them. I must apologize to the dedicated, learned and sensitive mycologists here present if this uncouth posting offends you - be consoled by the thought that I shall either disappear totally (heavenwards) within six days -  or otherwise, if you just ignore me!
Kind regards, dear learned gents and ladies,
Mac
 
Christopher G Williams
Posts: 69
Location: Ossineke, MI
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Hopefully you didn't end up getting sick; that one on the far right is just a bit past the point where you would want to eat it. They are C. comatus for sure, but you need to grab this type of mushroom as young as you can get it, because they can degrade in a matter of hours and turn into something that can make you sick.
 
                                  
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Thanks for the response, Mushrooman - I didn't actually eat the old one and I have survived to try the new crop, now ready!
Mac
 
Tyler Ludens
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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I have to say, I hope you won't be impulsive with wild mushrooms in general!  Some are just fine for you until you drink some alcohol.  One really does need to know quite a bit to safely eat wild mushrooms.

But maybe I'm paranoid!  I spent about 9 hours identifying wild Chanterelles before I would eat them.    And then I didn't even like them.
 
                                  
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H Ludy Tyler - when you consider that consequences of a slip, who could not be paranoid? Do you know what symptoms to expect when an unsuitable species is taken together with alcohol? I assume the toxin is the same in these situations? Perhaps I was rather rash - even with such a distinctive species as c. comatus - but I reasoned that there is nothing even near like it that is positively deadly - but then I read that somebody mistook a. phalloides for this; maybe they had taken their alcohol a bit early?
Thanks,
Mac
 
Kay Bee
Posts: 471
Location: Jackson County, OR (Zone 7)
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While I generally don't have much use for lawn, I was very pleased to look out the window this morning and see that a couple of shaggy mane mushrooms (coprinus comatus) had popped up overnight in the yard of our rental hosue. My son and I had just walked over the area yesterday evening and there was no sign of them at that point. They grow very quickly!

I let them grow until dinner time tonight and then picked them. The one on the right has already started maturing spores which causes the cap to start to liquify. The one on the left is at an earlier stage and is still white on the top half of the cap and stipe.

http://wellheeledhills.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/shaggy-manes-4-13-12.jpg

While these are some of the most common mushrooms that come up in lawns in North America, i've never had the chance to eat any. I chopped the top half of the one that was still in good shape and did a quick saute with a tiny bit of butter. Delicious!

I will use the mature portions of these mushrooms to try and innoculate some of the garden beds in our orchard. The straw bales up there are already colonized by another coprinus family mushroom, the inky cap:

http://wellheeledhills.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/inky-caps-4-13-12.jpg
 
Jonathan Fuller
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I love shaggy manes. But I think they are best eaten for breakfast. My wife would, once in a while go out for a run and come back with her shirt full of shaggy manes that I would saute with a little onion and garlic, add cream and serve on toast. mmmmm. drooling now, and I already ate lunch even.
 
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